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Magneto-Optic Modulator

Brief description not available

Electric Ratchet Based Ion Pumps

UCI researchers developed a new device that uses electricity to drive ion separation across a membrane. This device can increase the energy efficiency of various applications such as artificial photosynthesis, water desalination, and chemical separations.

(SD2018-098) Platinum Nanorod Electrode Arrays For Highly Sensitive And Initiative Brain-Machine Interfaces

The enhanced electrochemical activity of nanostructured materials is readily exploited in energy devices, but their utility in scalable and human-compatible implantable neural interfaces can significantly advance the performance of clinical and research electrodes. Traditional biologically inert noble metals such as Pt, Ir or IrPt – are preferential material choices for manufacturing nerve electrodes/ biomedical devices in clinical-relevant applications because of their biocompatibility and stability against corrosion, and because of their superior electrochemical properties compared to other material combinations. But despite these superior properties, the electrochemical interface impedance is not sufficiently low to enable recording minute potential fluctuations with low noise baseline or to efficiently inject charges across the interface without building large voltages across the interface and therefore consuming larger powers per pulse.  As a result, large electrodes are needed to compensate for this large impedance, but large electrodes compromise spatial resolution and specificity for recording and/or stimulation and limit the density and overall number of contacts. To increase the surface area and decrease the electrochemical impedance, nano-structures are often incorporated onto electrode surfaces to enhance their electrochemical properties. Prior work has successfully incorporated nano-structured Pt into electrodes, using electrochemical methods (electro-plating) , but these electrodes suffered from poor structural integrity and physical strength due to incorporation of electrochemical surfactants at the interface between nano-structured Pt and the underlying electrode. Furthermore, common approaches for the fabrication of nano-structured Pt are generally not monolithic and face additional challenges for translation to clinical practice whereas some are also problematic due to the residual of toxic ligand additives remaining after Pt alloy electro-deposition.  

Integration And Mass Transfer Of Microleds

Brief description not available

Nanoparticles-Enabled Casting of Bulk Ultrafine Grained/Nanocrystalline Metals

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace engineering have fabricated bulk, thermally stable ultrafine grained/nanocrystalline metals using conventional casting techniques.

High Performance Iron Electrocoagulation Systems for Removing Water Contaminants

The inventors have developed an iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) system for arsenic removal. The system offers a highly effective, low cost, robust method for removing arsenic from groundwater used for drinking, at community scale (10,000 liters per day).The main advance of this invention is to replace the assembly of inter-digited flat steel plates with an assembly of spiral-wound or folded and inter-digited two steel sheets separated only with perforated insulating spacers. This substantially reduces the energy consumption in comparison to other Fe-EC reactors, and allows for larger flow rates for a given reactor size than the standard inter-digited flat plate configuration. This advance is possible because the system relies on: externally added (ppm quantities) of oxidizer (H2O2), and a newly-discovered effect that allows consistent iron dissolution at high current densities. High current density also produces copious quantities of micro-bubbles of H2 gas, which flushes the space between the electrodes continuously during operation, preventing the clogging that has defeated earlier attempts.In a typical Fe-EC reactor, parallel inter-digited plates of mild steel are inserted into the contaminated water and a small DC voltage is applied between alternate plates to promote anodic dissolution of F(0) metal to release Fe(II) ions into the contaminated water. The Fe(II) ions react with dissolved oxygen in the water to produce Fe(III) that is used to capture the contaminants. Typically, an assembly of flat inter-digited parallel steel plates, with nearest neighbor spaced 2 cm to 5 cm, is used in Fe-EC reactors. Occasionally, externally added or in-situ produced oxidants may be used (e.g. externally added strong oxidants such as H2O2, O3, Chlorine, Permanganate, etc., or in-situ produced strong oxidants such as H2O2 using carbon based cathodes). 

Diamond On Nanopatterned Substrates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a nanofabrication method for improving the thermal properties of polycrystalline diamond films grown by chemical vapor deposition.

Magnetoelectric Device with Two Dielectric Barriers

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a magnetoelectric memory device that uses two dielectric barriers for improved voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) properties.

Selective Deposition Of Diamond In Thermal Vias

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering have developed a new method of diamond deposition in integrated circuit vias for thermal dissipation.

A Nonvolatile Magnetoelectric Random Access Memory Circuit

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a nonvolatile random-access memory circuit (MeRAM) that is very dense, fast, and consumes extremely low power.

Voltage-Controlled Magnetic Memory Element With Canted Magnetization

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a method for voltage-controlled switching of the magnetization direction in MeRAM circuits.

Wideband Distributed Mixers

This technology is a simple, novel ultra wideband distributed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor mixer, which incorporates on-chip distributed transmission line. A wideband distributed mixer is capable of operation over a wide range of frequencies, and can carry large amounts data up to 250 feet, which makes it attractive for military and law-enforcement use.

Multilayer Batch Microfabricated Magnetic Shielding

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel batch microfabrication technique for microscale shielding layers, simultaneously pushing the limits of minimum size, maximum shielding factor, flexibility, and cost.

Highly Efficient Perovskite/Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Tandem Solar Cell

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed Perovskite/Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (PVSK/CIGS) tandem photovoltaic devices with ~22% efficiency.

Controlled Homo-Epitaxial Growth Of Hybrid Halide Crystals

Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have demonstrated tremendous potential for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to their remarkable carrier dynamics. However, current studies of electronic and optoelectronic devices have been focused on polycrystalline materials, due to the challenges in synthesizing device compatible high quality single crystalline materials.

Photo-induced Metal Printing Technique for Creating Metal Patterns and Structures Under Room Temperature

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a low-temperature metal patterning technique.

Stroboscopic Universal Structure-Energy Flow Correlation Scattering Microscopy

Flexible semiconductors are far less costly, resource and energy intensive than conventional silicon production. Yet, as an unintended consequence of semiconductor printing, the films produced contain structural heterogeneities, or defects, which can limit their capacity to shuttle energy, or, information, over device-relevant scales. To be able to fully embrace this new, greener process, it is essential to elucidate which physical material properties most influence energy flow and which defects are most deleterious to efficient energy transport so that they can be targeted for elimination at the materials processing stage. Although some rather complex approaches have recently been used to track energy flow, the applicability of each one depends on specifics of the semiconductor properties (bandgap, excitonic vs charge carrier form of excitation, strong absorption or emission). Existing techniques cannot therefore be applied to a broad range of materials, and often necessitate adapting samples to fit the specific requirements of the technique. A broadly applicable approach is therefore needed to non-invasively and simultaneously reveal and correlate material morphology and energy flow patterns across many scales.    Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a new high-sensitivity, non-invasive, label-free, time-resolved optical scattering microscope able to map the flow of energy in any semiconductor, and correlate it in situ to the semiconductor morphology. This device has been shown as a far simpler approach to spatio-temporally characterize the flow of energy in either charge or exciton form, irrespective of the electronic properties of the material, and with few-nm precision. Furthermore, built into this approach is the unprecedented capability to perform in situ correlation to the underlying physical structure of the material. 

Mechanical Process For Creating Particles Using Two Plates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Physics and Astronomy have developed a novel method to lithograph two polished solid surfaces by using a simple mechanical alignment jig with piezoelectric control and a method of pressing them together and solidifying a material.

Trademark: Flexible Fan Out Wafer Processing And Structure: Flextrate

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel biocompatible flexible device fabrication method using fan-out wafer level processing (FOWLP).

Shaped Piezoelectric Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Device

Piezoelectric Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (pMUTs) have attracted industry attention for their good acoustic matching, small geometry, low cost-by-batch fabrication, and compatibilities with CMOS and consumer electronics. While planar pMUTs have reasonable performance over bulk piezoelectric transducers, certain deficits remain in terms of coupling and acoustic pressure outputs, DC displacements, bandwidth, and power consumption. To address these deficiencies, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a next generation of shaped pMUTs which are no longer fully defined by resonance frequency and can accommodate larger pressure outputs and bandwidths. This new pMUT apparatus can significantly boost overall performance while dramatically reducing power as compared to flat diaphragm state-of-the-art pMUTs.

Enhancing Photoluminescence Quantum Yield for High Performance Optoelectrics

Surface defects dominate the behavior of minority carriers in semiconductors and optoelectronic devices. Photoluminescence quantum yield (QY), which dictates efficiency of optoelectrics such as LEDs, lasers, and solar cells, is extremely low in materials with a large number of surface defects. Researchers at UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a bis(trifluoromethane) sulfonamide (TFSI) solution for passivation/repair of surface defects in 2D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC). This air-stable solution-based chemical treatment provides unmatched photoluminescence QY enhancement to values near 100% without changing the surface morphology. The treatment eliminates defect-mediated non-radiative recombination, which eliminates the low performance limit of TMDC and enhances its minority carrier lifetime. This novel development can address surface passivation in numerous semiconductors which will lead to highly efficient light emitting diodes, lasers and solar cells based on 2D materials.

Thermal Devices for Controlling Heat Transfer

The technology is a heat transfer device. The key properties are a unidirectional heat flow, thin, sandwich structure, and a T-dependent thermal resistance. The technology functions via the heat pipe effect. The purpose of the technology is to provide a one-way heat flow in a compact form (in a thin layer) with T-dependent thermal resistance.

Novel Processing Method for Group III-V Semiconductor Surfaces

A processing method for group III-V semiconductor surfaces prior to high-dielectric constant dielectric deposition by atomic layer deposition (ALD) or another deposition method. 

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