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Browse Category: Semiconductors > Processing and Production

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Stream-Based Memory Access Specialization For General Purpose Processors

Researchers led by Zhengrong Wang and Tony Nowatzki from the Computer Science Department at UCLA have created a way to improve computer processing power, speed, and efficiency by optimizing how processors access memory.

Ultra-Compact Energy-Efficient Neurocomputing Platform

An energy, area, and speed efficient time-domain VMM circuit and neurotrophic processor architecture.

Quality Factor Enhancement For Highly-Selective Miniaturized Bandpass Filters

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed narrowband and high-selective filters with zero-insertion loss.

Diamond On Nanopatterned Substrates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a nanofabrication method for improving the thermal properties of polycrystalline diamond films grown by chemical vapor deposition.

Grating-Based Quantum-Cascade Vertical External Cavity Lasers In The Terahertz And Mid-Infrared

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed grating-based quantum-cascade vertical external lasers that operate in the terahertz and mid-infrared range.

High Speed Indium Gallium Nitride Multi-Quantum Well (InGaN MQW) Photodetector

A way to increase the bandwidth of InGaN MQW photodetectors to make them compatible with high-speed VLC links.

Magnetoelectric Device with Two Dielectric Barriers

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a magnetoelectric memory device that uses two dielectric barriers for improved voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) properties.

Selective Deposition Of Diamond In Thermal Vias

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering have developed a new method of diamond deposition in integrated circuit vias for thermal dissipation.

Continuous Fluidic Printing Of MicroLEDs

A fluidic printing technique for inorganic semiconducting materials and devices using acoustic focusing.

A Nonvolatile Magnetoelectric Random Access Memory Circuit

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a nonvolatile random-access memory circuit (MeRAM) that is very dense, fast, and consumes extremely low power.

Voltage-Controlled Magnetic Memory Element With Canted Magnetization

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a method for voltage-controlled switching of the magnetization direction in MeRAM circuits.

Wideband Distributed Mixers

This technology is a simple, novel ultra wideband distributed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor mixer, which incorporates on-chip distributed transmission line. A wideband distributed mixer is capable of operation over a wide range of frequencies, and can carry large amounts data up to 250 feet, which makes it attractive for military and law-enforcement use.

Multilayer Batch Microfabricated Magnetic Shielding

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel batch microfabrication technique for microscale shielding layers, simultaneously pushing the limits of minimum size, maximum shielding factor, flexibility, and cost.

Highly Efficient Perovskite/Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Tandem Solar Cell

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed Perovskite/Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (PVSK/CIGS) tandem photovoltaic devices with ~22% efficiency.

A General Solution-Processable Approach To High-Quality Two-Dimensional Ink Materials For Printable High-Performance Large-Area And Low-Cost Electronics/Optoelectronics/Thermoelectrics

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Materials Science & Engineering have developed a general and cost-effective solution-phase approach to create large-area and high-performance thin films or devices.

Controlled Homo-Epitaxial Growth Of Hybrid Halide Crystals

Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have demonstrated tremendous potential for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to their remarkable carrier dynamics. However, current studies of electronic and optoelectronic devices have been focused on polycrystalline materials, due to the challenges in synthesizing device compatible high quality single crystalline materials.

Photo-induced Metal Printing Technique for Creating Metal Patterns and Structures Under Room Temperature

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a low-temperature metal patterning technique.

Stroboscopic Universal Structure-Energy Flow Correlation Scattering Microscopy

Flexible semiconductors are far less costly, resource and energy intensive than conventional silicon production. Yet, as an unintended consequence of semiconductor printing, the films produced contain structural heterogeneities, or defects, which can limit their capacity to shuttle energy, or, information, over device-relevant scales. To be able to fully embrace this new, greener process, it is essential to elucidate which physical material properties most influence energy flow and which defects are most deleterious to efficient energy transport so that they can be targeted for elimination at the materials processing stage. Although some rather complex approaches have recently been used to track energy flow, the applicability of each one depends on specifics of the semiconductor properties (bandgap, excitonic vs charge carrier form of excitation, strong absorption or emission). Existing techniques cannot therefore be applied to a broad range of materials, and often necessitate adapting samples to fit the specific requirements of the technique. A broadly applicable approach is therefore needed to non-invasively and simultaneously reveal and correlate material morphology and energy flow patterns across many scales.    Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a new high-sensitivity, non-invasive, label-free, time-resolved optical scattering microscope able to map the flow of energy in any semiconductor, and correlate it in situ to the semiconductor morphology. This device has been shown as a far simpler approach to spatio-temporally characterize the flow of energy in either charge or exciton form, irrespective of the electronic properties of the material, and with few-nm precision. Furthermore, built into this approach is the unprecedented capability to perform in situ correlation to the underlying physical structure of the material. 

Fabrication Of 1D Sinusoidal Silicon Dioxide Substrate

UCLA researchers in the department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel fabrication process for microstrip patch antennas with size reduction and dual band capabilities.

Periodically Rippled Antenna

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have designed a periodically-rippled microstrip patch antenna for wireless communication systems.

Mechanical Process For Creating Particles Using Two Plates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Physics and Astronomy have developed a novel method to lithograph two polished solid surfaces by using a simple mechanical alignment jig with piezoelectric control and a method of pressing them together and solidifying a material.

Trademark: Flexible Fan Out Wafer Processing And Structure: Flextrate

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel biocompatible flexible device fabrication method using fan-out wafer level processing (FOWLP).

Two-Dimensional Patterning Of Integrated Circuit Layer By Tilted Ion Implantation

The proliferation of information technology (IT) – which has had dramatic economic and social impact – has been enabled by the steady advancement of integrated circuit (IC) technology following Moore’s Law, which states that the number of transistors on an IC “chip” doubles every two years. In other words, the primary reason for increasing the number of components (transistors) on a chip is to lower the manufacturing cost per component. Increased integration also has the benefits of providing for improved system performance and energy efficiency. Therefore, the semiconductor industry has steadily scaled linear transistor dimensions, by a factor of approximately 0.7´ with every new generation of manufacturing technology, over the past 50 years. The most advanced chips today comprise over 10 billion transistors within an area of a few cm2. The pace of IC technology advancement has slowed down for the most recent generations, however, due to fundamental limits of the conventional photolithographic patterning process. Double-patterning techniques such as “self-aligned double patterning (SADP)” are used today to pattern IC layers with sub-45 nm feature size and minimum pitch, well below the wavelength of light used in the photolithography process. These techniques involve many additional steps, including extra lithography and etching processes, however, which result in increased cost of patterning.  To address the issue of increasing patterning cost, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a new method for patterning an IC layer with minimum feature pitch smaller than the minimum pitch of the photolithographic process and with minimum feature size smaller than the lithographic resolution limit, using well-established planar processing techniques.  A significant advantage of this new method is that it can be used to define two-dimensional layout patterns, which can provide for more compact integrated circuits.

Interleaved 3D On-Chip Differential Inductor And Transformer

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an interleaved three-dimensional (3D) on-chip differential inductors and transformers used in silicon based radio frequency/millimeter wave integrated circuits

On-Chip Tunable Artificial Dielectrics

UCLA Researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed and reduced-to-practice an innovative method for making chips with tunable dielectrics so the wavelength of RF signals can be modified to achieve frequency tuning effects without effecting noise interference.

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