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Nanoporous Tin Powder For Energy Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a method of synthesizing micrometer tin particles with nanosporous architecture and have successfully demonstrated the use of these particles as a high energy density anode for Na-ion and Li-ion batteries. 

A New Methodology For 3D Nanoprinting

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a novel protocol to enable 3D printing with nanometer precision in all three dimensions using polyelectrolyte (PE) inks and atomic force microscopy.

Pyrite Shrink-Wrap Laminate As A Hydroxyl Radical Generator

The invention is a diagnostic technology, as well as a research and development tool. It is a simple, easy to operate, and effective platform for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and biological species. Specifically, this platform generates hydroxyl radicals for oxidative footprinting – a technique commonly employed in protein mapping and analysis. The platform itself is inexpenisve to fabricate, scalable, and requires nothing more than an ordinary pipet to use. In addition, it is highly amenable to scale-up, multiplexing, and automation, and so it holds promise as a high-throughput method for mapping protein structure in support of product development, validation, and regulatory approval in the protein-based therapeutics industry.

Spinodal-Based Co-Continuous Composites For High Performance Battery Electrodes

This is a method for creating a high performance battery electrode that provides better performance, is highly tunable for different electrochemical applications, and has the capacity for greater total energy storage than the current state of the art.

Self-Assembled, Molecular Auxetic Materials

When a material is compressed in one direction, it usually tends to expand in other directions. Poisson's ratio is a measure of this effect; it is the fraction of expansion divided by the fraction of compression. By calculation the Poisson's ratio cannot be less than -1.0 or greater than 0.5. Materials that have a positive Poisson's ratio easily undergo go shape changes but not volume changes. For example, when a rubber band is stretched, it becomes noticeably thinner without changing its volume. The class of material with negative Poisson's ratio is known as auxetics, aka anti-rubber or dilational materials. They have a hinge-like network structure. When compressed they tend to shrink, become more square and thicker (fatter in cross section when stretched), such as Gore-Tex and paper.

X-Ray-Triggered Release of Drugs from Nanoscale Drug Carriers

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have identified a means by which large quantities of inactive drugs (particularly chemotherapeutics) can be delivered by nanoscale drug carriers to a target location where they can be rendered active by X-rays.

Two And Three Dimensional DNA Antenna And Photonic Transfer Nanostructures

Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is a mechanism which describes the photonic energy transfer between two light-sensitive molecules (chromophores). A donor chromophore, initially in its electronic excited state, may transfer energy in the form of undetectable virtual photons to an acceptor chromophore. FRET has been widely used to study the structure and dynamic of biomolecules. Specifically, by using dyes conjugated on a DNA strand, FRET can be applied to molecular sensors in which fluorescence signals change as a result of altered distance between donor and acceptor chromophores due to hybridization or enzymatic reactions. In addition, the DNA strand can act as a photonic wire along which the photonic energy is transferred. However, because fluorescence is highly influenced by environmental conditions and surrounding molecules, the energy transfer from a donor dye conjugated on a DNA strand is easily quenched by the dye-DNA and dye-dye interaction, often lowering FRET efficiency to the acceptor dye. Furthermore, when multiple chromophore/fluorescent donors and acceptor groups/entities are arranged on 2D and 3D DNA structures, contact and other quenching mechanisms can occur which greatly reduce the long range FRET efficiency. This rapid loss of long distance FRET efficiency greatly reduces the viability of DNA based photonic wires and antennas and negates any useful or practical applications. Therefore quenching should be resolved in order to apply the molecular FRET system to the device fabrication with efficient energy transfer.

UCLA Inventors Create Platform Technology to Create Customizable Nanoscale Particles and Gels for Use in the Industrial Biomaterials Market

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering department, have developed a platform to create and modify nanoscale particles and gels for use in the industrial biomaterials market. The polypeptide based delivery vehicle platforms created by the Deming group are customizable in nearly all physical characteristics, can be tailored in size, loaded with hydrophobic and hydrophilic payloads, used in coatings, are fully synthetic, possess highly reproducible properties, and are inexpensive to prepare compared to solid-phase peptide synthesis.The platform can be used to create novel, need-based nanoscale vesicles or injectable hydrogels, and can also be used to augment existing materials systems.

UCLA Inventors Create Platform Technology to Create Customizable Nanoscale Wound Management Tools

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering department, have developed a platform to create and modify nanoscale vesicles and hydrogels for use in wound management. The poly-peptide based platforms created by the Deming group are customizable in nearly all physical characteristics, can be tailored in size, be loaded with hydrophobic, hydrophilic, or cellular payloads, adaptable to specific delivery locations, low toxicity, are fully synthetic, possess highly reproducible properties, and are inexpensive to prepare compared to solid-phase peptide synthesis. The platform can be used to create novel, need-based nanoscale vesicles or injectable hydrogels, and can be used to augment existing material systems.

UCLA Inventors Create Platform Technology to Create Customizable Nanoscale Particles and Gels for Use in the Industrial Biomaterials Market

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering department, have developed a platform to create and modify nanoscale particles and gels for use in the industrial biomaterials market. The polypeptide based delivery vehicle platforms created by the Deming group are customizable in nearly all physical characteristics, can be tailored in size, loaded with hydrophobic and hydrophilic payloads, used in coatings, are fully synthetic, possess highly reproducible properties, and are inexpensive to prepare compared to solid-phase peptide synthesis.The platform can be used to create novel, need-based nanoscale vesicles or injectable hydrogels, and can also be used to augment existing materials systems.

UCLA Inventors Create Platform Technology to Create Customizable Nanoscale Drug Delivery Materials

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering department, have developed a platform to create and modify nanoscale drug delivery particles. The poly-peptide based platforms created by the Deming group are customizable in nearly all physical characteristics, can be tailored in size, loaded with hydrophobic and hydrophilic payloads, adaptable to specific delivery locations, low toxicity, are fully synthetic, possess highly reproducible properties, and are inexpensive to prepare compared to solid-phase peptide synthesis.The platform can be used to create novel, need-based nanoscale vesicles or injectable hydrogels, and can also be used to augment existing nanoparticle systems.

UCLA Inventors Create Platform Technology to Create Customizable Materials for Imaging and Detection

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering department, have developed a platform to create and modify nanoscale vesicles and hydrogels for use in imaging and detection.The poly-peptide based platforms created by the Deming group are customizable in nearly all physical characteristics, can be tailored in size, be loaded with hydrophobic and hydrophilic payloads, adaptable to specific delivery locations, low toxicity, are fully synthetic, possess highly reproducible properties, and are inexpensive to prepare compared to solid-phase peptide synthesis.The platform can be used to create novel, need-based nanoscale vesicles or injectable hydrogels, and can also be used to augment existing nanoparticles.

Magnetically Tunable Photonic Crystals Based On Anisotropic Nanostructures

Background: Many companies are venturing into new ways to improve paint technology. Current paramagnetic paint can be applied on anything from building interiors to vehicles so that the color can easily change when electric currents are applied. This nanomaterial paint market is projected to grow to $1.4B by 2017 with many notable end users in the display, chemical and automotive industries.  Brief Description: UCR researchers have discovered photonic crystals that can be tuned by changing the magnetic field direction. These novel colloidal crystals have magnetic and anisotropic properties that allow them to reach maximum diffraction intensity at certain angles. This could serve as a platform technology since they can take whatever material given and optimize its optical components for assembly into photonic structures.

High Performance Thin Films from Solution Processible Two-Dimensional Nanoplates

UCLA researchers in the departments of Chemistry and Materials Science have recently developed a novel material for use in flexible, printed electronics.

Fast Micro- or Nano-scale Resolution Printing Methods and Apparatus

Fast, affordable three-dimensional printing or 3D manufacturing at micron or nano-scale is a holy grail for many high-tech industries. Current state of the art has generally been limited to smallest feature sizes in the 5-10 micron range, with metal-based 3D printer systems held at 100 microns. Another problem is 3D printers are limited to polymer media or require large laser sources. To address these issues, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed methods and devices to efficiently deposit desirable constituent materials (e.g. metallic, semiconducting, insulating, etc.) with precise micron and nano-scale resolution and without expensive laser requirements. These methods show promise in terms of fast sub-5 micron print speeds, material versatility, and structure sophistication. This is an entirely new fabrication tool, which is unencumbered by the limitations of existing 3D print-like functions, paving the way to arbitrary 2D and 3D nanoscale structures and devices that cannot be fabricated in any other way.

Hybrid Molecule Nanocrystal Photon Upconversion

Background: Solar resources are at a premium and the solar energy industry is a $130B market with growth projects of 30%. High demands for attaining renewable energy efficiently and cost-effectively, along with government incentives, are all good indicators for finding innovative ways to optimize solar energy systems.  Brief Description: Traditional semiconducting materials, i.e. silicon and cadmium telluride are unable to absorb all wavelengths of light for conversion into usable energy. UCR researchers were able to functionalize semiconducting nanocrystals that are very efficient in upconverting near infrared photons into higher energy photons. They have optimized upconversion through carefully formulated combinations of semiconductor nanocrystals and ligands that enhance emission by up to 3 orders of magnitude over traditional semiconducting materials. This will remedy current efforts to reduce electricity costs when applied in the solar industry.

Robust Superhydrophobic Coating for Aluminum Surfaces

This robust superhydrophobic coating is coated on aluminum surfaces by simple, low-cost chemical method. This coating demonstrates excellent hydrophobicity and enhances droplet shedding. By repelling water, it inhibits bacterial growth in heat exchanger fins surfaces. At the same time, with enhanced condensation, it greatly enhances overall heat transfer in air-side heat exchangers.

Nanomotor Photolithography

The rapid miniaturization of devices and machines has fueled the evolution of advanced fabrication techniques. However, current technologies of nanopatterning are still limited by the resolution of the pattern, the major cost of implementation, range of patterns that can be written, the patterning speed as well as the environment where such a technique can be used. The complexity and high cost of state-of-the-art high-resolution lithographic systems have prompted unconventional routes for nanoscale patterning. Inspired by the sophistication of natural nanomachines, synthetic nanomotors have recently demonstrated remarkable performance and functionality.

Piezoelectric Nanoparticle-Polymer Composite Foams

Mechanically flexible piezoelectric materials are highly sought after when building advanced sensors, actuators, and energy scavenger devices. The most common piezoelectric materials used in applications are focused on electroceramic thin films made from lead zirconate titanate or barium titanate. Although these materials can have large piezoelectric moduli, as thin films they are extremely brittle and difficult to shape into highly mechanically compliant structures. Improving mechanical flexibility of piezoelectrics, and creating higher order structures, is critical for driving new applications such as biological energy harvesting, compact acoustic transducers, and in vivo biodiagnostics.  There is a need to develop alternative materials that offer high piezoelectric coefficients while maintaining elasticity and isotropic mechanical integrity—that are also cheap to produce.

Process for the Fabrication of Nanostrucured Arrays on Flexible Polymer Films

The technology is a process for making arrays of nanostructures on polymer films.It features a two step process for creating thin polymer films with unique optical and wetting properties that can be used for coating both planar and curved surfaces.It is possible to implement this process in a mass fabrication process over large areas.

Novel Quantum Dot Field-Effect Transistors Free of the Bias-Stress Effect

Novel quantum dot field-effect transistors without bias-stress effect that also have high mobility and are environmentally stable.

Molecular vibrational resonance

Modification of scanning probe microscope for direct measurement of both, amplitude and phase of vibration of a single molecule.

Self-Assembled Modified Beta Solenoid Protein Scaffolds for Devices And Materials

Available for licensing are patent rights in novel and versatile beta solenoid proteins that are useful as scaffolds for nanoparticle assembly, photocatalytic devices, thermoelectric devices, passive absorption of small atoms or molecules, cement additive, heavy element remediation, heavy element absorption, and as biological catalysts.

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