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Growth-Factor Nanocapsules With Tunable Release Capability For Bone Regeneration

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Orthopedic Surgery have developed a method to deliver therapeutic proteins directly to the tumor site using nanocapsules.

Protein Nanocapsules With Detachable Zwitterionic Coating For Protein Delivery

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have developed a method to deliver therapeutic proteins directly to the tumor site using nanocapsules.

Efficient And Stable Of Perovskite Solar Cells With All Solution Processed Metal Oxide Transporting Layers

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a novel lead halide perovskite solar cell with a metal oxide charge transport layer.

Evaporation-Based Method For Manufacturing And Recycling Of Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a new method to manufacture and recycle metal matrix nanocomposites.

Design Of Semi-Transparent, Transparent, Stacked Or Top-Illuminated Organic Photovoltaic Devices

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed novel tandem transparent and semi-transparent organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices.

Silver Nanowire-Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle As A Transparent Conductor For Optoelectronic Devices

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a novel composite material made of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs).

Fabrication of nano-structures on multiple sides of a non-planar surface

The invention is a breakthrough in the method of fabrication of biomedical devices, making them safer and less infectious. It allows the reproduction of nano-features to one or both side of non-planar biomedical devices. This would improve the cell motility and kill bacteria.

Artificial cornea implant using nanopatterned synthetic polymer

The device is an artificial corneal implant comprised of a single, nanopatterned material. The device is durable, easy to implant, and robust against bacterial infection and other problems associated with other state-of-the-art ocular devices.

Ultra Light Amphiphilic And Resilient Nanocellulose Aerogels And Foams

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an energy efficient method of producing ultra-light aerogels with excellent dry compressive strength and tunable hydrophobicity by ambient drying of nanocellulose wet gels.

Synthetic polymer nanoparticle hydrogels for drug screening

Synthetic polymer nanoparticle hydrogels and polymers can be designed to interact with and sequester targeted bio-macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, and carbohydrates. These relatively inexpensive and target specific polymers could potentially replace current antibody therapies and protein purification procedures.

Synthesis Technique to Achieve High-Anisotropy FeNi

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an innovative synthesis approach to achieve high anisotropy L1 FeNi by combining physical vapor deposition and a high speed rapid thermal annealing (RTA).

A Micro/Nanobubble Oxygenated Solutions for Wound Healing and Tissue Preservation

Soft-tissue injuries and organ transplantation are common in modern combat scenarios. Organs and tissues harvested for transplantation need to be preserved during transport, which can be very difficult. Micro and nanobubbles (MNBs) offer a new technology that could supply oxygenation to such tissues prior to transplantation, thus affording better recovery and survival of patients. Described here is a novel device capable of producing MNB solutions that can be used to preserve viability and function of such organs/tissue. Additionally, these solutions may be used with negative pressure wound therapy to heal soft-tissue wounds.

Enhancing Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials with Interfacial Films

Nanostructured materials are a category of materials comprised of nanometer-scale crystals which exhibit order of magnitude higher strength when compared to their traditional counterparts with larger crystal sizes. The application of nanostructured materials has been limited due to seemingly inherent low ductility and high-temperature instability. The inventors at UCI have developed a nanostructured material that simultaneously exhibits increased ductility, strength, and thermal stability by the incorporation of amorphous intergranular films.

Shape Reconfigurable Materials And Structures For Shape Morphing, Energy Absorption And Tunable Phononic

The invention is a structured material that can be reshaped into multiple stable configurations. The material can be used to create highly adaptable components that can be reconfigured on demand, or absorb energy and vibrations.

Ultrafine Nanowires As Highly Efficient Electrocatalysts

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel process of synthesizing ultrafine jagged Pt nanowires with a record high utilization efficiency for fuel cell catalyst applications.

Novel Metal Chalcogenides For Pseudocapacitive Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel metal chalcogenides for pseudocapacitive applications. 

Enhanced Cycle Lifetime With Gel Electrolyte For Mn02 Nanowire Capacitors

The invention is novel way of preparing electrodes for nanowire-based batteries and capacitors with extremely long cycle lifetimes. The proposed assemblies last much longer than any comparable state of the art nanowire energy storage device, without loss of performance, and are comparable to liquid electrolyte-based technologies in terms of their figures of merit.

An Aza-Diels-Alder Approach To Polyquinolines

The invention is a simple and inexpensive synthetic approach to a diverse library of new polymeric materials with a host of useful and unique properties. Most notably, these materials can serve as precursors to rationally designed and bottom-up synthesized graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), including N-doped GNRs and GNRs with precisely defined and functionalized edges.

Graphen Layer Formation On A Carbon Based Substrate

Background: Plastics are cheap, durable, light-weight and have a wide range of practical applications. Despite its universality, plastic materials suffer from low thermal conductivity that limits them from many other uses. Graphene has many remarkable properties, that in conjunction with other materials, can enhance their functionality and usage in various market segments. The graphene market is projected to reach $200M by 2026. Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed a novel system and method for forming graphene layers on a substrate. The system allows for direct growth of graphene on diamonds and low temperature growth of graphene using a carbon source. Due to the various novel features of the system, one can make the most of graphene’s excellent intrinsic thermal conductivity by substantially improving the radio frequency characteristics. Thermal conductivity can be strengthened by adjusting the size and alignment of the graphene flakes. 

Cell Membrane-cloaked Nanofibers Promote Cell Proliferation and Function

Cloaking of synthetic structures with natural cell membranes has emerged as an intriguing strategy for presenting natural cell surface antigens and functions in the context of synthetic compositions with designed functions. Early forays into the field focused primarily on the development of cell membrane-coated spherical nanoparticles. While a boon to material sciences, such spherical structures cannot address the full spectrum of potential applications and the application of cell membrane cloaking techniques to nanofibers enables drastically different characteristics and applications.

Nanoporous Tin Powder For Energy Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a method of synthesizing micrometer tin particles with nanosporous architecture and have successfully demonstrated the use of these particles as a high energy density anode for Na-ion and Li-ion batteries. 

Low-variability, Self-assembled Monolayer Doping Methods

Semiconductor materials are fundamental materials in all modern electronic devices. Continuous demand for faster and more energy-efficient electronics is pushing miniaturization and scaling to unprecedented levels. Controlled and uniform doping of semiconductor materials with atomic accuracy is critical to materials and device performance. In particular, junction depth and dopant concentration need to be tightly controlled to minimize contact resistance, as well as variability effects due to random dopant fluctuations in the channel. Conventional doping methods such as ion implantation is imprecise and can have large variability effect. Moreover, energetic introduction of dopant species will often cause crystal damage, leading to incompatibility with nanostructured-materials and further performance degradation. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have experimented with an alternative approach to a wafer-scale surface doping technique first developed at the UC Berkeley in 2007. The team has demonstrated a controlled approach for monolayer doping (MLD) in which gas phase dopant-containing molecules form low-variability, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on target semiconductor surfaces.

A New Methodology For 3D Nanoprinting

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a novel protocol to enable 3D printing with nanometer precision in all three dimensions using polyelectrolyte (PE) inks and atomic force microscopy.

Pyrite Shrink-Wrap Laminate As A Hydroxyl Radical Generator

The invention is a diagnostic technology, as well as a research and development tool. It is a simple, easy to operate, and effective platform for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and biological species. Specifically, this platform generates hydroxyl radicals for oxidative footprinting – a technique commonly employed in protein mapping and analysis. The platform itself is inexpenisve to fabricate, scalable, and requires nothing more than an ordinary pipet to use. In addition, it is highly amenable to scale-up, multiplexing, and automation, and so it holds promise as a high-throughput method for mapping protein structure in support of product development, validation, and regulatory approval in the protein-based therapeutics industry.

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