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Small Molecule Generation of Multinucleated and Striated Myofibers from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Equivalent to Adult Skeletal Muscle

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have developed a novel means of generating adult skeletal muscle-equivalent myofibers from human pluripotent stem cells.

DNA Amplification by Electric Field Cycling (efc-PCR)

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a popular technique for amplifying and quantifying minute quantities of DNA. Technologies based on PCR are used for a wide range of applications, including forensics, disease detection, and laboratory tools. Researchers at UCI have developed a device that can implement a novel method for PCR based on voltage cycling as opposed to temperature cycling (the current method for PCR). This allows the device to be much more portable and compact than those currently available.

Stimuli Responsive Immunostimulants

An immune response typically occurs during inflammation, auto-immune diseases, or cancers. In such cases, chemical triggers, or immunostimulants, recognized by receptor proteins at cell membranes activate the immune cells. Researchers can use these immunostimulants to test how different cell subsets contribute to immune response mechanisms. This invention describes a novel type of immunostimulant that can be toggled on and off, both inside the body and in vitro.

Novel Solid Tumor Chemodrug LLS2

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a new library of small molecule LLS2 that can kill a variety of cancer cells

Antibodies targeting mammalian Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBP) 1 and 2

Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBP) are important factors that control lipid homeostasis in mammals. Researchers at UCI have prepared antibodies that have good affinity and specificity for human SREBP1/2 for use as research tools. These antibodies have application in genetic and immunotherapeutic research areas.

New Method to Increase the Rate of Protein Ligation Catalyzed by the S. Aureus Sortase A Enzyme

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a new method to increase the rate of ligation catalyzed by the S. aureus Sortase A enzyme

A Novel Method of Controlling Synaptic Plasticity via Pulse Gating

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a new method of selectively turning learning (synapse modification or synaptic plasticity) on or off in a neuromorphic circuit by using appropriately timed gating pulses. This method may be used in concert with synaptic plasticity to control learning (synaptic strength modification) in neuromorphic circuits and other neurally-inspired systems.

Enhanced Cell/Bead Encapsulation Via Acoustic Focusing

The invention consists of a multi-channel, droplet-generating microfluidic device with a strategically placed feature. The feature vibrates in order to counteract particle-trapping micro-vortices formed in the device. Counteracting these vortices allows for single particle encapsulation in the droplets formed by the device and makes this technology a good candidate for use in single cell diagnostics and drug delivery systems.

Novel Contrast Enhancement for Detection of Amyloid Beta Peptides using MRI, EPR, PET, and ESRM

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed nitroxide-coupled amyloid agents to produce contrast enhancement for amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) detection using MRI, EPR, PET, and ESRM.

Chiral Polymers Of Intrinsic Microporosity For Membrane Separation Of Enantiomers

Many pharmaceutical drugs exist as enantiomeric pairs, chemically-distinct mirror image of one another that often exhibit marked differences in biological activity. Current methods for separating enantiomeric mixtures to generate pure form of an effective drug involve multiple time-consuming and expensive steps. The invention herein describes a polymer that can selectively separate enantiomers in a simple, continuous process.

microfluidic device for preparation of monodisperse microcapsules and microvesicles

Many applications, ranging from in vivo cell culture growth to drug delivery, rely on microcapsules to encapsulate and protect cells or molecules until their desired release. These microcapsules are typically generated in immiscible fluid, which must be depleted before they can be effectively used. Researchers at UCI have recently developed a paper-based microcapsule extraction technique that is quicker, cheaper, and less damaging than conventional methods.

Identification Of A Factor That Promotes Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal

The Mikkola group at UCLA has discovered a novel regulator of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. The overexpression of this regulator increases the yield of ex vivo stem cell expansion and could thereby improve the efficiency of stem cell therapies. 

SIMPLE AND RAPID METHOD FOR QUANTIFICATION OF HALOGINATED DISACCHARIDES, SUCH AS SUCRALOSE, IN AQUEOUS MEDIA

Sucralose has become widely used as an artificial sweetener due in large part that it has low caloric content and is 600 times sweeter than table sugar (sucrose). Due to its resistance to metabolic degradation, sucralose can also be used as a marker for noninvasively assessing gastrointestinal small intestine or colonic permeability. This urinary marker is traditionally analyzed by time consuming and expensive methods, such as high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry or evaporative light scatter as the detectors. We have developed an alternative methodology of using a chemical-fluorescent technique for rapid analysis of halogenated disaccharides, such as sucralose.

Synthetic polymer nanoparticle hydrogels for drug screening

Synthetic polymer nanoparticle hydrogels and polymers can be designed to interact with and sequester targeted bio-macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, and carbohydrates. These relatively inexpensive and target specific polymers could potentially replace current antibody therapies and protein purification procedures.

Employing CRISPR-Cas9 to Target RNA in Live Cells

RNA's location in a cell -- and how and when it gets there -- can influence whether proteins are produced in the right location and at the appropriate time. For instance, proteins important to neuronal connections in the brain, known as synapses, are produced from RNAs located at these contacts. Defective RNA transport is linked to a host of conditions ranging from autism to cancer and researchers need ways to measure RNA movement in order to develop treatments for these conditions. As the intermediary genetic material that carries the genetic code from the cell's nucleus, scientists have long sought an efficient method for targeting RNA in living cells. RNA-programmed genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes has enabled rapid and accessible alteration of specific genomic loci in many organisms. A flexible means to target RNA would allow alteration and imaging of endogenous RNA transcripts analogous to CRISPR/Cas-based genomic tools, but most RNA targeting methods rely on incorporation of exogenous tags.

Enhanced Method of Geomasking Builds Upon Donut Method Using Demographic Information

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an enhanced geomasking method building upon the current “Donut Method” which considers demographic information when masking medical-related geographic data. In doing this, greater medical validity is preserved and greater research utility is acquired, all without substantial loss in anonymity.

Building blocks for 3D, modular microfluidics

Researchers at the University of CA, Irvine have developed modular microfluidic platforms consisting of microfluidic building blocks that can be connected in various configurations to construct complete microfluidic devices for different applications.

An Integrated Microfluidic Platform For Selective Extraction Of Single-Cell mRNA

The invention is a high-density, single-cell trapping array. A specialized probe tip can be precisely manipulated to non-destructively collect targeted intracellular material from the trapped cells for measurements. Due to the non-destructive nature of the invention, the integrity and function of the trapped cells can be preserved and they can be monitored over time to better understand disease processes.

Novel Method for Finding Low Abundance Sequences By Hybridization

This invention describes a novel method for enriching rare sequences in nucleic acid libraries.

Compositions and Methods using RNA Splicing Modulation to Selectively Impair Leukemic Cancer Stem Cells

The advancing age of the US population and increasing exposure to chemotherapy (for other malignancies) has resulted in increased rates of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Following on the heels of MDS is progression to therapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is predicted to rise significantly over the next few decades.  The heterogeneity of molecular abnormalities in therapy-resistant secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) combined with a paucity of effective treatment options has resulted in high relapse-related mortality rates. In addition to approved therapies, many experimental agents also target epigenetic regulators of gene expression in clinical trials for sAML. However, most of these agents fail to improve patient survival, suggesting that epigenetic modifier therapies may reduce leukemic burden but may not effectively target a subpopulation of therapy-resistant leukemia stem cells that drive relapse. Hence, there is a critical need for developing clinical candidates with different modes of action. Recent studies implicate the spliceosome as a therapeutic vulnerability in solid tumors.

Enhanced Fluorescence Readout And Reduced Inhibition For Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed an enhanced fluorescent detection method for nucleic acid amplification tests.

Microfluidic Pressure Regulator For Robust Hydrogel Loading Without Bursting

This invention is aimed at controlling the pressure in 3D cell cultures. It consists of a combination of microfluidic channels, which surround the extracellular matrix (ECM), tunable pressure-regulated valves, which activate when a threshold pressure is reached in the ECM, and a repository, to direct excess gel away from the cell culture if the threshold pressure is exceeded. It can prevent leakage of gel between adjacent cell cultures in high-throughput arrays and is compatible with various cell culture materials and injection equipment.

Discriminating Naive Human Pluripotency

UCLA Researchers in the Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology have developed a simple molecular approach to non-invasively distinguish and isolate human pluripotent stem cells that have reverted from the primed pluripotent state to the native state.

Continuous, enhanced detection of droplet contents in electrical impedance spectroscopy

The inventors at UCI have developed a method and system to make enhanced electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in a continuously flowing train of microfluidic droplets. The technique increases the sensitivity of the electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements, lowering detection limits and increasing the frequency of continuous measurements.

Mechanical Phenotyping Of Single Cells: High Throughput Quantitative Detection And Sorting

UCLA researchers have developed a novel high throughput mechanically activated sorting (MACS) device. 

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