Learn more about UC TechAlerts – Subscribe to categories and get notified of new UC technologies

Browse Category: Medical > Devices

Categories

[Search within category]

Esophageal Deflection Device

Cardiac ablations are common medical treatments for people with atrial fibrillation (Afib). During the ablation procedure, a cardiac electrophysiologist will thermally ablate, or burn off, defective heart tissue with radiofrequency or cryoablation technology. The esophagus is often in close proximity to the left atrium. Since the left atrial tissue is approximately 2mm thin, the heat can transfer through it to the esophagus in contact and cause thermal damage / lesions on the esophagus.  In worst-case rare scenarios, an atrio-esophageal fistula, or hole between the esophagus and the heart, can occur which has a ~75% mortality rate.  It would be ideal to move the esophagus away from the heart before or during the ablation procedure preventing thermal damage.

Sterilization of Face Masks and Respirators

Prof. Lorenzo Mangolini and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed an efficient and low-cost method to sterilize face masks and respirators with ozone. This novel design uses a flow through configuration where the ozone gas is directly flown through the fibers of the FPRs. The parts needed for construction of this system are widely available and small enough for the device to be easily portable. This approach can readily adapted for low-cost and simple sterilization of different FPRs to allow for them to be safely reused.  Fig 1: Picture of the dielectric barrier discharge reactor used in the mask sterilization experiments.

Particle-Sorting Device for Isolation, and Enrichment of Particles at Ultra-Low Concentrations

The ability to detect and sort particles by type is important to many fields, such as medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety.UCI researchers have developed a platform to sort and isolate particles from a turbid medium with minimal pre-processing. The platform is very desirable for applications in which enrichment of particles or biological substances at low concentrations is necessary.

Device for Edema Reduction Following Spinal Cord Injury

Prof. Victor Rodgers and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a method for effectively treating excess swelling from fluid, or edema, following a spinal cord injury. Following severe contusion to the spinal cord, edema accumulates and compresses the tissue against the surrounding dura mater. It is believed that this compression results in restricted flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and ultimately collapses local vasculature, exacerbating ischemia and secondary injury. This technology includes a surgically mounted osmotic transport device (OTD) that rests on the dura and can osmotically remove excess fluid at the injury site to reduce secondary injury. Fig 1: | Effects of OTD treatment on % water content after severe SCI. Percent (%) water content calculated SCI only, SCI + hydrogel (HG), and SCI + OTD following treatment. The figure shows a statistical reduction in % water content in tissue following OTD treatment  

Mapping Ciliary Activity Using Phase Resolved Spectrally Encoded Interferometric Microscopy

Researchers at UCI have developed an imaging technique that can monitor and measure small mobile structures called cilia in our airways and in the oviduct. This invention will serve as a stepping stone for study of respiratory diseases, oviduct ciliary colonoscopy and future clinical translations.

Low Cost and Simple Microfluidic Placer Method

Professor Brisk’s research group at the University of California, Riverside, has developed Directed Placement, a new method for the placement and routing of microelectronics and very large scale integration (mVLSI) devices. Most microfluidic devices have a naturally directed structure: fluid is injected into the device via designated input ports, flows through the devices for process, and exits the device via designated output ports. The use of lanes and a straightforward left-to-right placement scheme yields layouts that are easier for designers to understand and modify, even at large scales. This technology allows researchers to produce their own microfluidics devices through a simple and low cost directed placement method. Fig. 1 shows a microfluidic device layout designed and laid-out by the UCR software.  

Intraprocedural Grid Localization System

Brief description not available

Non-invasive Head and Neck Cancer Screening Probe based on Optical Coherence Tomography

Researchers at the Beckman Laser Institute have developed a non-invasive fiber optic probe capable of imaging and detecting cancerous tissue within the head and neck regions. The probe also helps to guide surgeons in effectively performing tumor removal.

A Voice Inversion System To Estimate Vocal Fold Properties From Voice Acoustics

Prof. Zhang in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery has developed a voice inversion system that assesses the physiological state underlying voice production. The system can be used to diagnose vocal fold disorders as well as determine the emotional state of a speaker.

Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography Using a Polarization-Insensitive Detector

A polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a common approach to non-invasively imaging in biomedical applications. The inventors have come up with a new way of creating a PS-OCT that is cheaper and simpler.

The Uro-Wheel

Though guidewires are a common part of many endoscopic procedures as they help the scope reach its desired organ successfully, they are often difficult to maneuver due to their flexible and slippery construction. To combat this and assist physicians in rapid and effective endoscopic placement, researchers at UCI have developed a novel device which, by a simple turn of a finger wheel, allows the guidewires to be automatically and controllably advanced and retracted.

Personalized Oncology Drug Efficacy Monitoring Chip

Researchers at UCI have developed a novel microfluidic-based platform that enables personalized drug screening of patient-derived cancer cells. This versatile device features real-time, continuous screening of patient samples without the need for expensive labeling reagents, large sample sizes, or bulky readout equipment.

The Vaccushield Aka Slacc (Suction-Assisted Local Aerosol Containment Chamber)

UCLA researchers in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine have developed a device that can act as a protective barrier for healthcare workers from patients with contagious respiratory pathogens.

A Wearable Freestanding Electrochemical Sensing System

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a strategy for high-fidelity, wearable biomarker data acquisition and sensor integration with consumer electronics.

A Thin Film Nitinol Neurovascular Covered Stent For Small Vessel Aneurysms

UCLA researchers in the Department of Pediatrics have developed a thin and flexible stent that can be implanted in small vessels in the neurovascular system. Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-CN X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

A Fully Integrated Stretchable Sensor Arrays for Wearable Sign Language Translation To Voice

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel machine learning assisted wearable sensor system for the direct translation of sign language into voice with high performance.

Insulin Infusion Cannulas with Superior Performance

Researchers at UCI have developed the application of a biocompatible material to insulin infusion devices for Type 1 Diabetes to improve device strength, reduce scar tissue buildup, and increase the efficiency of insulin delivery.

Laser Additive Manufacturing Method For Producing Porous Layers.

A method of metal additive manufacturing which allows for production of porous products with pore size potentially down to the nanometer-scale.

Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy Device for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (FLIM-AST)

Antibiotic resistant bacterial infection is a global public health threat leading to prolonged hospital stays, higher medical costs, and increased mortality rates. UCI researchers developed a device to rapidly determine antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria from patient samples to determine more effective antibiotic treatments.

A Wireless Textile Based Sensor System for Self-Powered Personalized Health Care

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a textile-based sensor system (TS system) for wireless, wearable biomonitoring.

Unobtrusive Fetal Heartrate Monitoring In The Daily Life

A novel wearable, unobtrusive flexible patch designed to facilitate continuous monitoring of fetal heart rate (fHR) and ECG by pregnant women in a home setting.

New And Integrated Method For Continuous Auditory Brain Stimulation

Various examples of delivering continuous auditory stimulation of various kinds (sometimes referred to by the term “entrainment”) have been proposed to modulate brainwaves for therapeutic effect. Current methods of delivering continuous auditory stimulation typically present noises (in the form of clicks, tones, pulses) embedded in music. By modulating the user’s existing audial environment to embed continuous auditory sound stimulation, this technology creates a more tolerable and user-friendly experience that enables prolonged therapeutic stimulation for such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

Wireless and Programmable Recording and Stimulation of Deep Brain Activity in Freely Moving Humans Immersed in Virtual, Augmented or Real-World Environments

UCLA researchers in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences have a designed a lightweight, highly mobile deep brain activity measuring platform that elucidates neural mechanisms for neuropsychiatric disorders.

High Resolution Laser Speckle Imaging of Blood Flow

Prof. Guillermo Aguilar and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a new approach to laser speckle imaging, called Laser Speckle Optical Flow Imaging (LSOFI) to be used for autonomous blood vessel detection and as a qualitative tool for blood flow visualization. LSOFI works by capturing the speckle displacement caused by different physical behavior and use the data to create a mapped image. It has been shown that LSOFI has many advantages over LSCI methods both in temporal and spatial resolution. Namely, LSOFI can be used to produce higher resolution images compared with the LSCI method using less frames. Combining this technology with Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computation increases the speed of LSOFI, so GPU enabled LSOFI shows potential to create a fast and fully functional quasi-real time blood flow imaging system.  Fig 1: Comparison of blood flow imaging techniques applied to the raw image. The shown results are for Laser Speckle Optical Flow Imaging (LSOFI) using the Farneback Optical Flow algorithm, traditional Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI), and Temporal Frame Averaging (sLASCA).  

  • Go to Page: