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(SD2021-314) MULTI-THOUSAND CHANNEL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY ARRAYS

Electrophysiological devices are critical for mapping eloquent and diseased brain regions and for therapeutic neuromodulation in clinical settings and are extensively utilized for research in brain-machine interfaces. However, the existing devices are often limited in either spatial resolution or cortical coverage, even including those with thousands of channels used in animal experiments.

Vascular Anastomosis Device

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a surgical device to facilitate vascular anastomosis procedures with enhanced ease and speed.

Devices and Methods for Monitoring Respiration of a Tracheostomy Patient

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a small device that attaches directly to the hub of a tracheostomy tube and enables the monitoring of respiratory function in tracheostomy patients during sleep studies.

(SD2020-421) Virtual Electrodes for Imaging of Cortex-Wide Brain Activity: Decoding of cortex-wide brain activity from local recordings of neural potentials

As an important tool for electrophysiological recordings, neural electrodes implanted on the brain surface have been instrumental in basic neuroscience research to study large-scale neural dynamics in various cognitive processes, such as sensorimotor processing as well as learning and memory. In clinical settings, neural recordings have been adopted as a standard tool to monitor the brain activity in epilepsy patients before surgery for detection and localization of epileptogenic zones initiating seizures and functional cortical mapping. Neural activity recorded from the brain surface exhibits rich information content about the collective neural activities reflecting the cognitive states and brain functions. For the interpretation of surface potentials in terms of their neural correlates, most research has focused on local neural activities.   From basic neuroscience research to clinical treatments and neural engineering, electrocorticography (ECoG) has been widely used to record surface potentials to evaluate brain function and develop neuroprosthetic devices. However, the requirement of invasive surgeries for implanting ECoG arrays significantly limits the coverage of different cortical regions, preventing simultaneous recordings from spatially distributed cortical networks. However, this rich information content of surface potentials encoded for the large-scale cortical activity remains unexploited and little is known on how local surface potentials are correlated with the spontaneous neural activities of distributed large-scale cortical networks. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

(SD2022-014) Neural Signal Detection of Immune Responses: miniaturized wireless data streaming system to detect early infection

A promising area of clinical research has been growing in wearable diagnostics that has proven to be a powerful tool in healthy physiological as well as disease diagnostics. As the field grows and develops, a number of specializations are already emerging including diagnostics focused on: cardiac dysfunction, epilepsy, and most recently infectious disease detection.

Digital Microfluidic Plasmonic Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Device

This technology automates the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process using digital microfluidics for droplet manipulation. The invention also increases PCR speed and efficiency by combining electrowetting and plasmonic heating in a single device.PCR tests have a wide variety of applications, including the diagnosis of infectious organisms such as viruses and bacterias, as well as cloning, mutagenesis, sequencing, gene expression, and more. The test has become a gold standard for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. In the PCR process, a gene or part of the DNA of the infecting organism is amplified exponentially to the extent that it can be detected using conventional methods like gel electrophoresis. This invention addresses the following challenges in current PCR methods: a long sample to answer time; and manual manipulation by humans, which increases the error rate in the tests.  

Medical/Surgical Instrument-Bending Device

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a device that allows needles to be reliably and easily bent to a range of specified and reproducible angles. The device also enables protection of the needle tip and the maintenance of needle sterility during bending.

Fetal Oximetry Measurement via Maternal Transabdominal Spectroscopy

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a non-invasive, near-infrared, spectroscopy technique that measures fetal oxygen saturation via the maternal abdomen.

Laser Photocoagulation To Stabilize Collector Channels To Enhance Aqueous Flows

Inventors at the University of California, Irvine have developed a laser-emitting device that treats glaucoma by enlarging and stabilizing collector channels in order to enhance aqueous outflow and reduce intraocular pressure (IOP).

Growth-Accomodating Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve System

UCI researchers have developed a novel transcatheter pulmonary valve (TPV) that addresses the current lack of options for children with progressive pulmonary valve regurgitation (PVR), which may lead to right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure. This TPV allows for implantation into patients of a younger age, preventing the progression of PVR and the RV issues that follow, and can also expand to accommodate the need for a larger pulmonary valve as the patient grows.

Simple, User-friendly Irrigator Device for Cleaning the Upper Aerodigestive Tract and Neighboring Areas

Researchers at UCI have developed a user-friendly consumer medical device capable of cleaning and removing food particles and bacteria that accumulate in and around the back of the throat. Without removal, this accumulation may lead development of halitosis (bad breath) or inflammation that may require more serious medical intervention.

(SD2021-087) Bioinspired Wet Adhesives: Suction discs for adhesion to rough, delicate, and wet surfaces

Adhesion involves highly complex and hierarchical structures in nature, and by understanding the biological intricacies of such adhesive structures, one can improve engineered adhesives. The role of reversible adhesion in both the natural world and in engineering is to temporarily bind to a surface, providing the opportunity to detach and re-attach as needed. In nature, animals use attachment to enhance their fitness.  In robotics, reversible adhesion enables improved manipulation and locomotion by managing contact at the interface between the robot and its environment.

Staged Fascial Closure Device

The current invention enables the safe closure of an open abdomen during surgery when the abdominal fascia cannot be closed primarily.

Flexthrough: A Recirculation Mechanism In Point Of Care CD Microfluidic Using Elastic Membrane

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine have developed a new method and device to efficiently mix and analyze liquid samples on CD-based point of care devices.

FlexThrough: a recirculation mechanism in point of care CD microfluidic using elastic membrane

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine have developed a new method and device to efficiently mix and analyze liquid samples on CD-based point of care devices.

2-D Polymer-Based Device for Serial X-Ray Crystallography

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a single-use chip for the identification of protein crystals using X-ray based instruments.

Integrated Virtual Reality and Audiovisual Display Support System for Patients in a Prone Position

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an integrated virtual reality and audiovisual support system that increases the comfort of patients who are undergoing diagnostic tests or medical procedures in the prone and other positions.

Digital Droplet Infusion System for High-Precision, Low-Volume, Delivery of Drugs or Nutritional Supplements

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed the first, digital, droplet infusion system capable of high-precision delivery of very low-volume therapeutics or nutraceuticals.

Device for Spinal Dural Repair

Dural tear is a frequent and costly complication of spinal surgery, which can cause cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, triggering additional, serious post-operative difficulties. Researchers at UC Irvine have developed a new method and device to mitigate dural tears in a rapid, safe, and water-tight manner

Seamless Ceramics for Biomedical Applications

Prof. Guillermo Aguilar-Mendoza and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside (UCR) and Prof. Javier Garay and his colleagues from the University of California, San Diego have developed an all ceramic, biocompatible, hermetically sealed package for encapsulating electronics. This technology uses disparate transparent polycrystalline ceramics and is sealed by laser.  The laser directly joins the disparate surfaces, protecting the electronic device from damage while ensuring a high-quality seal. This state-of-the-art technology provides  superior packaging for biomedical implant devices that has long-term biocompatibility. It also provides safe and leak-proof seals. Fig 1: Picture of transparent ceramics fabricated at UCR.

Percutaneous Heart Valve Delivery System Enabling Implanted Prosthetic Valve Fracture

UCI researchers developed a percutaneous heart valve delivery system to deliver and implant a prosthetic valve. This system incorporates the means to fracture a previously implanted prosthetic valve in situ without interfering with the transcatheter valve to be implanted.

Novel Tunable Hydrogel for Biomedical Applications

Prof. Huinan Liu’s lab at the University of California, Riverside has developed a novel tunable hydrogel that achieves tunable crosslinking, reversible phase transition, and may be used as a 3DP scaffold. This new hydrogel utilizes dynamic coordination of its innate carboxylic groups and metal ions. Adding methylacrylate or other functional groups is not required for this technology and the resulting hydrogel is less toxic. Since the functionalization of this hydrogel is not required, it is less process-intensive and results in a more cost-effective hydrogel.  In addition, the UV curing is no longer needed since methylacrylate is no longer utilized to crosslink the hydrogel.   Fig 1: Optical micrographs of top view and cross-section of HyA hydrogels printed using cold-stage method and direct writing method. Hydrogels printed using direct writing method showed better structural integrity and stability.

Hemoglobin Carrying PEG Microspheres As Artificial Red Blood Cells

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed artificial red blood cells consisting of hemoglobin that is tethered to polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules and formed into microspheres.

Single Catheter System Combining Intravascular Ultrasound and Fiber-Based Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a catheter device that combines intravascular ultrasound with fluorescence lifetime imaging to better detect significant vascular conditions.

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