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Development of a Detachable Endoscope

Endoscopes are used in many fields of medicine to investigate, diagnose, and treat patients. One common procedure that utilizes an endoscope (known as a bronchoscope), is the procedure of intubation that is conducted over 16 million times in the United States annually. To intubate a patient successfully, a physician needs to insert an endotracheal tube (ETT) into the patient’s mouth and secure it in the airway. A delay in securing the ETT into position of greater than 4 minutes can result in permanent brain injury or death of the patient. Malfunction of an indwelling ETT itself or changes in the airway anatomy may lead to emergent need for ETT exchange. The bronchoscope is the gold standard device for confirming the proper placement of an ETT in the trachea and the ultimate method for regaining control. A detachable endoscope design offers additional key advantages potentially allowing the insertion tube portion to be an economical, disposable, single patient use device, eliminating the concern over superbug cross contamination and reducing cost of processing and maintenance.

Portable Lung Assist Device

UCLA researchers have developed a portable integrated system and device that supports failing human lungs, allowing patients to move around without the assistance of another person.

Method for Synchronizing a Pulsatile Cardiac Assist Device with the Heart

Patients with severe heart failure can require both a cardiac pacemaker to help the timing of the heart and a ventricular assist device (VAD) to physically help pump blood. UCI researchers have developed a method to synchronize the actions of a pulsatile VAD with a pacemaker in order to reduce heart stress and improve treatment effectiveness.

Wearable Voltammetric Monitoring of Electroactive Drugs

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a voltammetric wearable device capable of monitoring electroactive drug circulation and abundance in biofluids. This non-invasive monitoring system can be used for electroactive drug therapy management, drug compliance/abuse monitoring, drug-drug interaction studies, and personalized dosing.

Bioresorbable Device for Neural Injury Repair

Prof. Huinan Liu and her colleagues at the University of California, Riverside have developed a method for incorporating magnesium (Mg) microwires into nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) to improve neural healing. Mg-based microwires are naturally biodegradable and bioresorbable in the body, mechanically strong, and electrically conductive for neural stimulation and controlled release of neuroprotective ions. This bioresorbable neural device does not require removal surgery as it degrades in a natural and safe manner. Overall, the integration of Mg-based microwires into NGCs can accelerate nerve recovery process while eliminating the need for removal surgery.  Fig. 1: Scanning electron micrographs of Mg wire embedded in a polymer nerve guidance conduit (NGC). Cross-section.    

Multi-Sensing Intravascular Catheter to Prevent Heart Attack or Stroke

UCLA researchers in the Department of Medicine have developed a multi-functional catheter that combines different sensing capabilities to improve the detection of unstable plaques.

MySpirometer

UCLA researchers have developed an incentive spirometry system that encourages and advises patients to perform incentive spirometry with minimal aid from healthcare professionals.

Low-Cost Paper-Based Microfluidic Diagnostic Device

Prof. Mulchandani and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a new paper-based microfluidic platform for the simple and low-cost fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based chemiresistive nanobiosensor arrays for multianalyte sensing from a single small volume sample that may be used as point-of-care diagnostic for a variety of purposes, including healthcare, food safety, environment, etc. This device is created by utilizing a wax printer to construct well-defined hydrophobic barriers for equal splitting and delivery of fluid and an inkjet printer to fabricate chemiresistors using a water-based SWNT ink on a paper substrate. Currently, the quantitative and selective detection of both human serum albumin (HSA) and human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) simultaneously in urine has been demonstrated by UCR. This paper-based chemiresistive biosensor is easy to fabricate, and designed for cost-effective, rapid, sensitive and selective detection of  analyte(s) of interest. This technology provides a platform for automated, disposable paper-based point-of-care diagnostics with multiplexed detection capability and microfluidic controls. Fig 1: A 3D microfluidic multiplexed paper-based biosensor array device.

Wirelessley Powered Stimulator

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a battery-less implantable pulse generator with concise circuitry and mm-scale form factor.

Mechanisms and Devices Enabling Arbitrarily Shaped, Deep-Subwavelength, Acoustic Patterning

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a Compliant Membrane Acoustic Patterning (CAMP) technology capable of patterning cells in an arbitrary pattern at a high resolution over a large area.

Handle Mechanism And Functionality For Repositioning And Retrieval Of Transcatheter Heart Valves

Improved catheter devices for delivery, repositioning and/or percutaneous retrieval of percutaneously implanted heart valves are described, including a medical device handle that provides an array of features helpful in conducting a percutaneous heart valve implantation procedure while variously enabling radial expansion or contraction and/or lateral positioning control over the heart valve during the medical procedure.

Nanoparticles-Enabled Casting of Bulk Ultrafine Grained/Nanocrystalline Metals

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace engineering have fabricated bulk, thermally stable ultrafine grained/nanocrystalline metals using conventional casting techniques.

Liquid Metal Enabled Multi-Functional Neural Probes with Ultra-Large Tunable Stiffness

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel multi-functional neural probe with ultra-large tunable stiffness for electrochemical sensing and chemical delivery in the brain.

Methods For Development Of Hybrid Tissue Engineered Valve With Polyurethane Core

A hybrid tissue engineered heart valve leaflet including a polyurethane core, such as a polycarbonate-based thermoplastic polyurethane like carbothane. The polyurethane core is enclosed within one or more layer of a patient's cells and collagen. Also disclosed are hybrid tissue engineered heart valves, including a frame; and at least two leaflets attached thereto in a configuration of a heart valve, wherein the leaflets are hybrid tissue engineered heart valve leaflets, and methods of making a hybrid tissue engineered heart valve for deployment in a patient.Patent application publication no. US20190151509A1 

Multi-Stage Wireless Powering Mechanism for Long-Term Implantable Medical Devices

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel invention for wirelessly powering long-term implantable medical devices.

Bioresorbable Orthopedic Implants

Prof. Huinan Liu and her colleagues at the University of California, Riverside have developed a bioresorbable nutrient-based magnesium alloy that may be used for repairing fractured bones. This alloy offers comparable mechanical strength to current metal implants, and safely degrades in vivo to natural metabolic products with a controlled degradation rate. In addition, the degradation products of this alloy induce bone regrowth and promote fracture healing. Fig. 1: Illustration of bioresorbable nutrient-based magnesium alloys for repairing bone fractures.  

3D Printed Normal Force Sensor

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel 3D printing method that produces customizable normal force sensors for robotic surgical applications at high speed and low cost.

Semi-Implantable Hearing Aid

Inventors at UCI have developed a semi-implantable hearing aid that provides similar sound clarity to an implanted device. The UCI device allows sound to be transmitted to the inner ear without invasive surgery. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} table.MsoTableGrid {mso-style-name:"Table Grid"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-priority:39; mso-style-unhide:no; border:solid windowtext 1.0pt; mso-border-alt:solid windowtext .5pt; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-border-insideh:.5pt solid windowtext; mso-border-insidev:.5pt solid windowtext; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Calibration Of Continuous Blood Pressure

Brief description not available

Manumeter for Monitoring and Assessing Upper Extremity Rehabilitation

After an injury or neurological event, a patient’s rehabilitation requires long-term assessment and monitoring, especially in the upper extremities that are important for everyday tasks.UCI researchers have developed the Manumeter to quantitatively assess and log a patient’s hand movements without external therapist intervention.

Bioresorbable Electrodes for Recording, Stimulation, and Drug Delivery

Prof. Huinan Liu and her colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed new magnesium based bioresorbable electrodes capable of recording, stimulating, and repairing neural tissues for a wide range of diseases and injuries. These new electrodes degrade naturally in aqueous physiological environments and eliminate the need for surgical removal of the implanted electrodes. This technology would benefit both doctors, patients, and researchers by introducing a new generation of neural electrodes that minimize damage to neural tissue while providing the option of drug delivery with the conductive polymer coating.

A Wearable Platform for In-Situ Analysis of Hormones

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a highly sensitive, wearable hormone monitoring platform.

Ultra-Low Cost, Transferrable and Thermally Stable Sensor Array Patterned on Conductive Substrate for Biofluid Analysis

UCLA researchers from the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel biosensor array that is ultra-low cost and thermally stable. It prolongs the lifetime of electrode modules of sensor products and allows for extended sensing operation in uncontrolled environments.

Wearable Monitor of Attentional Integrity and Mental Strain

UCLA researchers in the Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences have developed a novel brain monitoring device that can be worn inconspicuously.

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