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Automated titration of vasopressor infusion within predefined guardrails for efficient hypotension management

The invention automatically controls the blood pressure of patients on a continuous basis. It monitors the blood pressure and takes an action, within safety limits, whenever needed. The invention represents a dramatic improvement in the hypotension and critical care management.

Calcified Polymeric Valve and Vessels

A cast molded methodology for creating polymeric heart valves and vessels with calcium apatite inclusions. The heart valves and vessels can then be implanted in animals to test cardiovascular medical device efficacy.

Respiratory Monitor For Asthma And Other Pulmonary Conditions

A patch sensor that is able to continuously monitor breathing rate and volume to diagnose pulmonary function and possibly predict and possibly prevent fatal asthma attacks.

Portable waterborne pathogen detector

The inventors at the University of California, Irvine, have developed an automated, easy-to-use digital PCR system that can be used at the time of sample collection, making it highly effective in microbial pathogen analysis in resource-limited settings and extreme conditions.

Predictive Optimization Of Pharmeceutical Efficacy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a machine learning platform to virtually screen combinatorial drug therapies.

Plasmon Resonance Enhanced Optical Means for Surface Disinfection

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a novel surface disinfection material for use in hospital coatings.

TREATING TYPE-1 DIABETES BY PRESERVING BETA CELL FUNCTION

This invention proposes the first pharmacological treatment to prevent the onset of Type I diabetes by preventing beta cell destruction. 

Deep Learning Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel microscopy analysis that improves resolution, field-of-view and depth-of-field in optical microscopy images.

Computational Out-Of-Focus Imaging Increases The Space-Bandwidth Product In Lens-Based Coherent Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a wide-field and high-resolution coherent imaging method that uses a stack of out-of-focus images to provide much better utilization of the space-bandwidth product (SBP) of an objective-lens.

Nell-1 Regulates Neurogenesis And Nervous System Function

UCLA researchers in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Geffen School of Medicine and researchers at the School of Dentistry have identified neural EGFL Like 1 (Nell-1) protein as an essential molecule involved in neurogenic development and nervous system functional regulation.

Sparsity-Based Multi-Height Phase Recovery In Holographic Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a sparsity-based phase reconstruction technique implemented in wavelet domain to achieve more than 3-fold reduction in the number of holographic measurements for coherent imaging of densely connected samples with minimal impact on the reconstructed image quality.

Artificial Hair Transplantation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery have developed a novel bio-inert scaffold with artificial hairs to be inserted in the scalp to artificially restore hair.

The Use of Voltammetry Based Assessment of Neurotransmitters and Metabolites in Vivo

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Medicine, Radiology and Bioengineering have developed novel methods for monitoring cardiac autonomic function in vascular and tissue compartments by measuring neurotransmitters and metabolites in vivo.

METHOD FOR DETECTING AND TREATING NASAL AND LUNG DYSBIOSIS PATIENTS WITH MICROORGANISMS

This invention uses sequencing of microbiota community for diagnosis and treatment of lung and nasal dysbiosis.

Purifying Breast Milk of Alcohol

Nursing mothers commonly abstain from drinking alcohol for up to a year or longer, to protect their infant from alcohol toxicity. This invention eliminates all alcohol from pumped breast milk, thus insuring infant safety and granting freedom to the mother who wishes to partake of alcoholic beverages.

Composition for Bone and Methods of Making and Using the Same

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Plastic Surgery, Bioengineering, and Dentistry have developed a method of controlling the osteoclast/osteoblast ratio for use in osteoporosis therapy.

Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Anxiety Disorders, and Disorders with Psychotic Features

UCLA researchers have developed a novel therapeutic strategy to alleviate post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms via deep brain stimulation.

Small Molecules for Melanoma Treatment

Traditional anti-cancer treatments used for metastatic melanoma (skin cancer) can result in cell toxicity, poor efficacy, and low patient survival. UCI researchers have uncovered a class of potent compounds that inhibit cancer cell growth and induce cancer cell death by targeting RhoJ signaling pathways.

Wireless In Situ Sensors in Stents for the Treatment and Monitoring of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD)

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel wireless sensor for external and internal biosensing applications.

Exercise Promotion, Measurement, and Monitoring System

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel wireless sensor and exercise system for real-time exercise promotion and monitoring.

Anti-Microbial Contact Lens With Ocular Drug Delivery

Anti-microbial, anti-fungal drug eluting contact lens for the controlled release of ophthalmic therapeutics.

Novel Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal Nanopillared Surface

Medical devices are susceptible to contamination by harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, which form biofilms on device surfaces. These biofilms are often resistant to antibiotics and other current treatments, resulting in over 2 million people per year suffering from diseases related to these contaminating microbes. Death rates for many of these diseases are high, often exceeding 50%. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel anti-bacterial and anti-fungal biocomposite that incorporates a nanopillared surface structure that can be applied as a coating to medical devices.

A Prognostic And Diagnostic Algorithm For Various Molecular Subtypes Of Breast Cancers, Including Her2 Positive And Triple Negative Breast Cancers (TNBCs)

Breast cancer is second leading cause of death among women in the United States in 2016 and It is estimated to be responsible for over 40,000 deaths in 2017 (ACS). The use of biomarkers plays a key role in the management of patients with breast cancer, especially in the decision process to select the appropriate systemic therapy to be administered. Furthermore, the discovery of new tissue-based and gene biomarkers has led to the development of a “molecular signature” for predicting patient outcome and treatment modalities. There are three subtypes of breast cancer that are determined by performing specific tests on a sample of the tumor. The first subtype is a tumor that is positive/negative for a hormone receptor, either estrogen (ER) and/or progesterone (PR); tumors without these receptors are classified “hormone receptor-negative”. The second subtype is characterized by the overexpression the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein on the tumor.  HER2 proteins are receptors on normal breast cells and help control the growth, but when overexpressed make the tumor grow faster and are designated HER2-positive tumors. The last subtype is designated triple-negative, since it does not express ER, PR, and/or HER2. 

A Method for Inhibition of de novo Lipogenesis

The obesity epidemic currently afflicting the US and other developed countries has resulted in a marked increase in the incidence of the metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), estimated to affect 30% of Americans. Although NAFLD is characterized by lipid droplet buildup in hepatocytes, it is not accompanied by liver damage, inflammation, and fibrosis unless combined with other risk factors, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. In the context of simple, nonsymptomatic liver steatosis, ER stress or mitochondrial dysfunction trigger nonalcoholic steatohepatits (NASH), a serious disease that can progress to liver cirrhosis, resulting in loss of liver function, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most deadly cancers. The obesity epidemic currently afflicting the US and other developed countries has resulted in a marked increase in the incidence of the metabolic syndrome and its associated pathologies, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), estimated to affect 30% of Americans. Although NAFLD is characterized by lipid droplet buildup in hepatocytes, it is not accompanied by liver damage, inflammation, and fibrosis unless combined with other risk factors, such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. In the context of simple, nonsymptomatic liver steatosis, ER stress or mitochondrial dysfunction trigger nonalcoholic steatohepatits (NASH), a serious disease that can progress to liver cirrhosis, resulting in loss of liver function, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most deadly cancers.

A Method For Screening Drugs, Nutritional Supplements And Probiotics For Their Ability To Enhance Or Disrupt The Gut Barrier

The gut is a complex environment; the gut mucosa maintains immune homeostasis under physiological circumstances by serving as a barrier that restricts access of trillions of microbes, diverse microbial products, food antigens and toxins to the largest immune system in the body. The gut barrier is comprised of a single layer of epithelial cells, bound by cell-cell junctions, and a layer of mucin that covers the epithelium. Loosening of the junctions induced either by exogenous or endogenous stressors, compromises the gut barrier and allows microbes and antigens to leak through and encounter the host immune system, thereby generating inflammation and systemic endotoxemia. An impaired gut barrier (e.g. a leaky gut) is a major contributor to the initiation and/or progression of various chronic diseases including, but not limited to, metabolic endotoxemia, type II diabetes, fatty liver disease, obesity, atherosclerosis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Despite the growing acceptance of the importance of the gut barrier in diseases, knowledge of the underlying mechanism(s) that reinforce the barrier when faced with stressors is incomplete, and viable and practical strategies for pharmacologic modulation of the gut barrier remain unrealized.

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