Learn more about UC TechAlerts – Subscribe to categories and get notified of new UC technologies

Browse Category: Biotechnology > Health

Categories

[Search within category]

An Implantable Electrocorticogram (ECoG)-Brain-Computer Interface System for Restoring Lower Extremity Movement and Sensation

A fully implantable brain-computer interface (BCI) with onboard processing to control a robotic gait exoskeleton as a walking aid for individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). This technology would alleviate SCI patient’s dependence on wheel chairs, reducing the risk of secondary medical complications that account for an estimated $50 billion/year in healthcare costs.

Spatio-Temporal Pacing and Recording for Evaluation, Induction, and Mapping of Arrhythmias

Researchers led by Marmar Vaseghi from the School of Medicine at UCLA have developed a high density electrode array to evaluate, induce, and map arrhythmias.

Liquid Biopsy Diagnostic for Precursor Lesions of Pancreatic Cancer

These highly specific biomarkers distinguish potentially malignant mucinous cysts from benign nonmucinous cysts in the pancreas to help diagnose precursor lesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The biomarkers can be detected through enzymatic assays with exceptional accuracy and sensitivity.

Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes for the Treatment of Corneal Scarring

UCLA researchers in the Department of Ophthalmology have developed a novel method to heal corneal scarring using exosomes from immortalized corneal stem cells.

Inhibition of Pyruvate Oxidation to Promote Hair Growth

UCLA researchers in the departments of Molecular, Cell & Developmental Biology and Biological Chemistry have elucidated a novel mechanism by which pyruvate oxidation can be inhibited in order to promote hair growth.

Oral Microsensor Arrays for Remote Monitoring of Salivary Electrolytes for Precision Healthcare

UCLA researchers in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery have developed a novel microsensor system for unobtrusive monitoring of oral pH and electrolytes levels. This system is integrated into a data analysis and feedback network for disease prevention and precision care.

Insect Repellents and Assay

Prof. Anandasankar Ray and his colleagues at the University of California, Riverside (UCR) have developed insect repellants to deter insects from detecting and biting humans. The repellants are comprised of a group of compounds consisting of an aldehyde, mono- or  diketone and an alcohol. Repellants mask the insect’s ability to detect CO2. These repellants can be delivered in a variety of forms and can be used in much smaller concentrations and remain effective for much longer when compared to traditional repellants like DEET. The UCR lab also developed and patented a computational assay to screen and identify mosquito repellents. This assay was used to identify the patented compounds that disrupt CO2 sensing in mosquitos.   Fig. 1 Effect of inhibitory odor, 1-hexanol, on mosquito neuronal CO2 response. The small black bar indicates an 0.5 second exposure to inhibitory odor overlayed with a 3 second response to CO2. The second chart shows how CO2 response is mitigated by the odor   Fig. 2 Effect of pre-exposure to inhibitory odors on long-term reduction to CO2 response. The response to a 0.3% CO2 impulse over 6 minutes was measured every 30 seconds after an initial 3-second exposure to an ‘odor’ mixture (black bars). The odor mixture consisted of 1-hexanolo, pentanal, butanal, and 2,3-butanedione at 10-2 concentration. Paraffin oil (white bars) was used as a control      

A Cell-Based Seeding Assay for Huntingtin Aggregation

UCLA researchers from the Department of Psychiatry has created a novel cell-based seeding assay for sensitive, specific and high throughput detection of mutant Huntingtin proteins in biological samples.

Methods for Enhancing Cell Populations for Articular Cartilage Repair

Cartilage lesion treatments require expanding cells from healthy donor cartilage which have limited availability and restricted potential to produce cartilage. This invention overcomes these challenges, presenting chemical and physical methods for enhancing cell populations capable of producing neocartilage. According to a 2015 global market report, tissue engineering technologies are expected to reach over 94B USD by 2022.

Methods for Producing Neocartilage with Functional Potential

Cell expansion for cartilage tissue production usually leads to loss of the potential to produce cartilage, which impedes uses for cartilage repair. This invention features methods and systems for producing highly expanded primary cells to construct functional neocartilage and other neotissue. According to a 2015 global market report, tissue engineering technologies are expected to reach over 94B USD by 2022.

Genes, Proteins and Small Molecule Networks Responsible for Neuronal Regeneration

Through integrative analyses of the regeneration-associated gene expression profiling after peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury, combined with multi-level bioinformatics and experimental validation of network predictions, UCLA researchers in the Department of Neurology have identified a small molecule drug that significantly accelerates and improves dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurite outgrowth in vitro and optic nerve outgrowth in vivo.

Near-Realistic Sports Motion Analysis and Activity Monitoring

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computer Science have developed a new technology to fight the growing obesity epidemic by encouraging exercise in video games.

Colorimetric Sensing Of Amines

An affordable and easily synthesized indicator that can be applied to monitor reaction progress in a system using only one inexpensive and non-toxic agent.

Apparatus and Signal Processing Technique for Real-Time Label-Free High-Throughput Cell Screening

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have invented a novel apparatus for real-time label-free high-throughput cell screening.

Biomarker of Dyskinesia to Customize Medication or Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Patients

This invention has provided methods for detecting dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease patients and provided a way to titrate current treatment to maximize benefits while minimizing side effects.

An Osteoadsorptive Fluorogenic Substrate of Cathepsin K for Imaging Osteoclast Activity and Migration

UCLA researchers in the Department of Dentistry have developed a novel fluorescent probe for studying the role of osteoclasts in bone diseases and for detecting the early onset of bone resorption by targeting an important protein Cathepsin K. This probe can also deliver drug molecules to bone resorption sites with high specificity.

Automated Beam Orientation and Scanning Spot Spacing Optimization for Robust Heavy Ion Radiotherapy Therapy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiation Oncology have developed a new method to automate and optimize heavy ion beam radiotherapeutic techniques for the treatment of cancer.

Probability Map of Biopsy Site

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiological Science have developed a technique for generating a probability map on an MRI that indicates the certainty of tissue sampling from a location, which could improve imaging-guided biopsies and their correlation with pathology.

Novel Inhibitor of HIV Replication

UCLA researchers in the David Geffen School of Medicine have discovered a new small molecule inhibitor for HIV-1 replication.

Plasmonic Nanoparticle Embedded PDMS Micropillar Array and Fabrication Approaches for Large Area Cell Force Sensing

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel cell force sensor platform with high accuracy over large areas.

Bidirectional IVC Filter

Researchers at UCLA from the Department of Radiology have developed an improved IVC filter with better filtering performance that is easily retrievable.

Human Resistin for the Treatment of Sepsis

Prof. Meera Nair and her colleagues at UCR have discovered that human resistin may be used as a therapy to treat sepsis.  Using a transgenic mouse model expressing human resistin, researchers showed that  mice expressing resistin had a 80-100% rate of survival from a sepsis-like infection when compared to wildtype mice with the same infection. The researchers also found that human resistin decreased the number of pro-inflammatory and Th1 cytokines.  Through immunoprecipitation assays, human resistin was found to bind to TLR-4 thus blocking the TLR-4 signaling in immune and inflammatory cells. Fig. 1 shows the survival curves for four different mouse models exposed to a sepsis like infection. The red line represents wild type C57BL/6 mice and none of these mice survived the infection. The black line is the background mouse model without the transgene incorporated into its genome. The Tg+ and Tg2+ are two different transgenic mouse models expressing human resistin. Fig. 2 shows that structural modeling predicts that resistin (green/blue) binds TLR4 (red) and blocks binding LPS co-receptor MD2 (grey)

Using DNA Methylation Markers to Predict the Age of Dogs

UCLA researchers in the department of Human Genetics and Biomathematics and Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology have developed a method of determining the biological age of dogs and wolves by examining DNA methylation patterns.

Titanium Plates For Bone Regeneration

UCLA researchers in the School of Dentistry at the Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biology have developed a new titanium plate to promote bone regeneration in dental reconstruction procedures.

A Highly Error-Prone Orthogonal Replication System For Targeted Continuous Evolution In Vivo

Inventors at UC Irvine have engineered an orthogonal DNA replication system capable of rapid, accelerated continuous evolution. This system enables the directed evolution of specific biomolecules towards user-defined functions and is applicable to problems of protein, enzyme, and metabolic pathway engineering.

  • Go to Page: