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MicroRNA regulation of airway mucins for treatment of lung diseases

This invention describes a novel therapeutic microRNA target regulating mucus production for the management of symptoms caused by a range of lung diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis, and the common cold. Recently, a specific miRNA, along with its highly homologous family members, has been shown to be dysregulated in asthmatic subjects. To modulate the effect of these miRNAs, antagomirs (which target specific endogenous miRNAs and dampen their effect) or miRNA mimics can be administered via an inhaler, allowing for the regulation of mucus production. This invention is at the preclinical stage, and in vivo testing in a mouse model of asthma has shown that treatment with a specific miRNA antagomir results in a significant reduction of airway mucus production. While there are currently no effective therapies targeting mucus production in the airways, miRNAs are a promising new avenue for therapeutic intervention as they are fast-acting and reversible. 

Esophageal Deflection Device

Cardiac ablations are common medical treatments for people with atrial fibrillation (Afib). During the ablation procedure, a cardiac electrophysiologist will thermally ablate, or burn off, defective heart tissue with radiofrequency or cryoablation technology. The esophagus is often in close proximity to the left atrium. Since the left atrial tissue is approximately 2mm thin, the heat can transfer through it to the esophagus in contact and cause thermal damage / lesions on the esophagus.  In worst-case rare scenarios, an atrio-esophageal fistula, or hole between the esophagus and the heart, can occur which has a ~75% mortality rate.  It would be ideal to move the esophagus away from the heart before or during the ablation procedure preventing thermal damage.

Implantable Substance Delivery Devices

This invention describes a method for preparing an implantable device made from biocompatible polymers for sustained delivery of a substance within a body of human or an animal.

A Wearable Freestanding Electrochemical Sensing System

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a strategy for high-fidelity, wearable biomarker data acquisition and sensor integration with consumer electronics.

A Thin Film Nitinol Neurovascular Covered Stent For Small Vessel Aneurysms

UCLA researchers in the Department of Pediatrics have developed a thin and flexible stent that can be implanted in small vessels in the neurovascular system. Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-CN X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

A Fully Integrated Stretchable Sensor Arrays for Wearable Sign Language Translation To Voice

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel machine learning assisted wearable sensor system for the direct translation of sign language into voice with high performance.

A Wireless Textile Based Sensor System for Self-Powered Personalized Health Care

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a textile-based sensor system (TS system) for wireless, wearable biomonitoring.

New And Integrated Method For Continuous Auditory Brain Stimulation

Various examples of delivering continuous auditory stimulation of various kinds (sometimes referred to by the term “entrainment”) have been proposed to modulate brainwaves for therapeutic effect. Current methods of delivering continuous auditory stimulation typically present noises (in the form of clicks, tones, pulses) embedded in music. By modulating the user’s existing audial environment to embed continuous auditory sound stimulation, this technology creates a more tolerable and user-friendly experience that enables prolonged therapeutic stimulation for such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

Virtual Reality For Anhedonia Program

UCLA researchers in the Department of Psychology have developed a behavioral training program for the improvement of anhedonia.

Gut Microbiome Enhancement via Co-delivery of Antibodies and Activated Bacterial Strains

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a mechanism to deliver unique complexes of protective antibodies and probiotics to the gut.

Method to Enhance the Effectiveness of HIV Vaccines

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed adjuvants that promotes the efficacy of HIV vaccines.

Mediator-Free Electroenzymatic Sensing with Enhanced Sensitivity and Selectivity for Wearable Metabolite and Nutrient Monitoring Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a wearable electroenzymatic sensor for non-invasive monitoring of metabolites and nutrients. The sensor has been successfully tested in human subjects to be highly sensitive and selective, making it ideal for monitoring and improving individual well-being.

Wearable Voltammetric Monitoring of Electroactive Drugs

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a voltammetric wearable device capable of monitoring electroactive drug circulation and abundance in biofluids. This non-invasive monitoring system can be used for electroactive drug therapy management, drug compliance/abuse monitoring, drug-drug interaction studies, and personalized dosing.

Novel Drug Delivery Platform

This invention is a novel method for synthetically designing protein carriers (enFoldin) for small molecules.  

Bioengineered RNA Molecules for Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to use biologic RNA molecules for cancer research and therapy.

Bioengineered Let-7c Therapy for HCC Treatment

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a bioengineered, RNA-based treatment for advanced liver cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

Training Platform for Transoral Robotic Surgery

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Bioengineering and Head & Neck Surgery have developed a novel robotic platform for the training of transoral surgery.

Photocurable Poly(ethylene glycol) as a Bioink for the Inkjet 3D Pharming of Hydrophobic Drugs

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel inkjet 3D pharming technique that is fast, customizable, and compatible with hydrophobic drugs.

Exosome-Mimicking Nanovesicles

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method of synthesizing stem cell-derived, exosome-mimicking, nanovesicles that have the therapeutic potential to rescue apoptotic neurons in culture.

Spray Dry Method for Calcium Cross-linked Alginate Encapsulation of Biological and Chemical Moieties via the Use of Chelating Agents

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a one-step spray dry calcium cross-linked alginate encapsulation process where the calcium is released from a chelating agent.

Design Random Heteropolymer To Transport Proton Selectively And Rapidly

Despite decades of effort, it remains challenging, if not impossible, to achieve similar transport performance similar to natural channels. Inspired by the known crystal structures of transmembrane channel proteins, protein sequence-structure-transport relationships have been applied to guide material design. However, producing both molecularly defined channel sizes and channel lumen surfaces that are chemically diverse and spatially heterogeneous have been out of reach. We show that a 4-monomer-based random heteropolymer (RHP) exhibits selective proton transport at a rate similar to those of natural proton channels. Statistical control over the monomer distribution in the RHP leads to well-modulated segmental heterogeneity in hydrophobicity, which facilitates the single RHP chains to insert into lipid bilayers. This in turn produces rapid and selective proton transport, despite the sequence variability among RHP chains. We have demonstrated the importance of:the adaptability enabled by the statistical similaritythe modularity afforded by monomer chemical diversity to achieve uniform behavior in heterogeneous systems. 

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