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Browse Category: Materials & Chemicals > Composites

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Graphene-Polymer Nanocomposite Incorporating Chemically Doped Graphene-Polymer Heterostructure for Flexible and Transparent Conductive Films

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel graphene-polymer nanocomposite material for flexible transparent conductive electrode (TCE) applications.

Quasi Van Der Walls Epitaxy Of GaAs on Graphene

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel method of Quasi Van der Waals epitaxial growth of GaAs on Si using graphene as a buffer layer.

Scalable And Inexpensive Production Of Polymer-Metal Nanocomposite By Thermal Drawing

UCLA researchers have developed a fabrication process for uniformly distributing metallic nanoparticles within polymer fibers.

Composite Foam

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel composite foam for impact applications.

Robust Mesoporous Nife-Based Catalysts For Energy Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have used selective dealloying method to produce novel high-performance, robust, and ultrafine mesoporous NiFeMn-based metal/metal oxide composite oxygen-evolving catalysts.

3D Printer with Improved Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)

Three dimensional (3D) printer and rapid prototyping (RP) systems are currently used to quickly produce objects and to prototype parts using CAD tools. Most RP systems use an additive, layer-by-layer approach to building parts by joining liquid, powder, or sheet materials to form physical objects. Some of these RP systems through selective laser sintering amalgamate materials by heating them with lasers to generate 3D printed objects. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have created a new 3D printer with improved selective laser sintering. The new 3D printer and process varies the composition of the materials in a 3D printed object thus creating an object with enhanced strength, conductivity, heat resistance and other enhancing properties.

Transparent Bulk Photoluminescent Quantum Dots/Polymer Nanocomposite

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed highly transparent, photoluminescent nanocomposites containing record-high levels of quantum dots.

Architected Material Design For Seismic Isolation

Just in the Los Angeles area alone, USGS database shows a 95.23% change of a major earthquake occurring. While there are a variety of seismic devices already installed for the protection of high value structures, other customizable, cost efficient devices currently don’t exist for a wide range of other structures such as apartments, residential homes, or event moderate to high value equipment and artifacts. University of California has invented a novel material and method for creating cost efficient seismic protection devices for all types of such structures.

Multifunctional Cement Composites With Load-Bearing And Self-Sensing Properties

As improvements in technology allow for construction of bigger, more uniquely designed skyscrapers, bridges, and motorways that can carry greater loads and are seismically sound, current cement composites are being pushed to their performance limits. Now more than ever, assessing damage to cement composite structures is of integral importance. However, traditional methods can be destructive, subjective, and may not detect previously existing damage, which can be invisible to the naked eye or hidden beneath structural surfaces. Addition of conductive additives, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to cementitious composites attributes both load-bearing and damage self-sensing properties to the composites. However, current formulations and methods for producing these multifunctional cement composites require specialized equipment, are labor, time, and capital intensive, and are not scalable.

Novel Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal Nanopillared Surface

Medical devices are susceptible to contamination by harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, which form biofilms on device surfaces. These biofilms are often resistant to antibiotics and other current treatments, resulting in over 2 million people per year suffering from diseases related to these contaminating microbes. Death rates for many of these diseases are high, often exceeding 50%. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel anti-bacterial and anti-fungal biocomposite that incorporates a nanopillared surface structure that can be applied as a coating to medical devices.

Biomass-Derived Polymers And Copolymers Incorporating Monolignols And Their Derivatives

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Bioengineering, Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel synthetic strategy for the fabrication of biomass-derived polymers incorporating underutilized lignin derivatives.

Concentration Of Nanoparticles By Zone Heating Method

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have invented a novel method to concentrate nanoparticles (NPs) into metal crystals via zone melting.

A Multiferroic Transducer For Audio Applications

Researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UCLA have developed a novel transducer for audio applications based on a multiferroic material.

Thermally Stable Silver Nanowire Transparent Electrode

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a novel transparent and flexible electrode material for optoelectronic device applications.

Evaporation-Based Method For Manufacturing And Recycling Of Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a new method to manufacture and recycle metal matrix nanocomposites.

Silver Nanowire-Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle As A Transparent Conductor For Optoelectronic Devices

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a novel composite material made of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs).

Shape Reconfigurable Materials And Structures For Shape Morphing, Energy Absorption And Tunable Phononic

The invention is a structured material that can be reshaped into multiple stable configurations. The material can be used to create highly adaptable components that can be reconfigured on demand, or absorb energy and vibrations.

Method For Imaging Neurotransmitters In Vitro and In Vivo Using Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

Neurotransmitters play a central role in complex neural networks by serving as chemical units of neuronal communication.  Quantitative optical methods for the detection of changes in neurotransmitter levels has the potential to profoundly increase our understanding of how the brain works. Therapeutic drugs that target neurotransmitter release are used ubiquitously to treat a vast array of brain and behavioral disorders.  For example, new methods in this sphere could provide a new platform by which to validate the function of drugs that alter modulatory neurotransmission, or to screen antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs.  However, currently in neuroscience, few optical methods exist that can detect neurotransmitters with high spatial and temporal resolution in vitro or in vivo.  Brain tissue also readily scatters visible wavelengths of light currently used to perform biological imaging, and neuronal tissue and has an abundance of biomolecules that are chemically or structurally similar and therefore hard to specifically distinguish.  Furthermore, neurotransmission relevant processes occur at challenging spatial  and temporal scales.    UC Berkeley investigators have developed polymer-functionalized carbon nanotubes for in vitro and in vivo quantification of extracellular modulatory neurotransmitter levels using optical detectors. The method uses the fluorescent optical properties of polymer-functionalized carbon nanotubes to selectively report changes in concentration of specific neurotransmitters. The scheme is novel in that the detection method applies to wide variety of specific neurotransmitters, it is an optical method and therefore gives greater spatial information, and enables the potential for imaging of one or more neurotransmitters. The optical method also produces less damage to the surrounding tissue than methods that implant electrodes or cells and allows high resolution localization with other methods of optical investigation. The invention takes advantage of favorable fluorescence properties of carbon nanotubes, such as carbon nanotube emission in the near infrared and infinite fluorescence lifetime.  The near infrared emission scatters less than shorter wavelengths, enabling greater signal recovery from deeper tissue, and allows greater compatibility with other techniques. The optical properties also enable long term potentially even chronic use. 

An Aza-Diels-Alder Approach To Polyquinolines

The invention is a simple and inexpensive synthetic approach to a diverse library of new polymeric materials with a host of useful and unique properties. Most notably, these materials can serve as precursors to rationally designed and bottom-up synthesized graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), including N-doped GNRs and GNRs with precisely defined and functionalized edges.

Chemically Modified Surfaces With Self Assembled Aromatic Functionalities

The invention is a method for mild and facile chemical modification of electroactive surfaces that permits tailoring of their physical properties and protects against corrosion.

Pyrite Shrink-Wrap Laminate As A Hydroxyl Radical Generator

The invention is a diagnostic technology, as well as a research and development tool. It is a simple, easy to operate, and effective platform for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and biological species. Specifically, this platform generates hydroxyl radicals for oxidative footprinting – a technique commonly employed in protein mapping and analysis. The platform itself is inexpenisve to fabricate, scalable, and requires nothing more than an ordinary pipet to use. In addition, it is highly amenable to scale-up, multiplexing, and automation, and so it holds promise as a high-throughput method for mapping protein structure in support of product development, validation, and regulatory approval in the protein-based therapeutics industry.

Fast Micro- or Nano-scale Resolution Printing Methods and Apparatus

Fast, affordable three-dimensional printing or 3D manufacturing at micron or nano-scale is a holy grail for many high-tech industries. Current state of the art has generally been limited to smallest feature sizes in the 5-10 micron range, with metal-based 3D printer systems held at 100 microns. Another problem is 3D printers are limited to polymer media or require large laser sources. To address these issues, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed methods and devices to efficiently deposit desirable constituent materials (e.g. metallic, semiconducting, insulating, etc.) with precise micron and nano-scale resolution and without expensive laser requirements. These methods show promise in terms of fast sub-5 micron print speeds, material versatility, and structure sophistication. This is an entirely new fabrication tool, which is unencumbered by the limitations of existing 3D print-like functions, paving the way to arbitrary 2D and 3D nanoscale structures and devices that cannot be fabricated in any other way.

Multifunctional Cement Composites with Load-Bearing and Self-Sensing Properties

This invention consists of a rapid, simplified, lower-cost method for production of a cement composite with enhanced load-bearing and damage detecting properties.

Durable, Plasticization-Resistant Membranes using Metal-Organic Frameworks

Over the last several decades, polymer membranes have shown promise for purifying various industrial gas mixtures. However, there are a number of potential applications in which highly polarizable gases (e.g., CO2, C3H6, C3H8, butenes, etc.) diminish membrane selectivities through the mechanism of plasticization. Plasticization is the swelling of polymer films in the presence of certain penetrants that results in increased permeation rates of all gases, but an unwanted, and often times, unpredictable loss in membrane efficiency. Current strategies for reducing plasticization effects often result in a reduction in membrane permeability. To address the need for plasticization-resistant membranes that retain good separation performance, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a novel method for improving polymer membrane stability and performance upon the incorporation of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). This method can be applied to a broad range of commercially available polymers as well as enable new polymers to be commercialized.

High Performance, Rare Earth-free Supermagnetostrictive Structures and Materials

Magnetostrictive materials convert magnetic fields into mechanical strain and vice versa. They are widely used in sensors, actuators, electrical motors and other technological devices. The materials currently used for these applications are relatively inefficient (e.g. nickel or iron-aluminum alloys) or are very expensive (e.g. Terfenol-D). To address these challenges, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a process framework using incipient martensitic transformations to achieve useful magnetostriction in relatively inexpensive materials. Early laboratory models suggest the Berkeley materials have comparable behavior to rare earth-based counterparts, with preliminary data to suggest superior performance than both rare earth-based and rare earth-free materials on the market today.

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