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TSV coupling mitigation coding techniques in 3D-ICs

Three-dimensional network-on-chip (NoC) designs are a crucial aspect of 3D integrated circuit platforms, though they suffer from unwanted and often detrimental effects due to coupling between their vertical through-silicon via (TSV) connections. Recently, researchers at UCI have developed algorithm-based techniques to mitigate such TSV-to-TSV coupling, capable of >90% reduction of such interactions.

III-Nitride Vertical Transistor with Ion Implantation Formed Aperture Region

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method of fabricating a III-nitride vertical transistor with aperture region formed using ion implantation as a path to achieve selective area doping.

Resistive Memory Write and Read Assistance Using Negative Differential Resistance Devices

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a new design of read and write circuitry using negative differential resistance devices to improve the performance of resistive memories.

Data Shepherding: Cache Design For Future Large Scale Chips

The ability of a central processing unit to store frequently-used data in nearby, easily accessible cache data banks has revolutionized computational performance, though their effective implementation in multicore processors has become a technological challenge. Researchers at UCI have developed a new means of data caching that is fully applicable to multicore processors, and offers reduced memory access time over standard techniques.

A Hybrid Silicon Laser-Quantum Well Intermixing Wafer Bonded Integration Platform

An approach for integrating InP-based photonic devices together with low loss silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics.

Internal Heating for Ammonothermal Growth of Group-III Nitride Crystals

A new process for heating vessels used in the ammonothermal growth of group-III nitrides.

Current to Voltage Converter for High-Speed Optical Fiber Communications

The exponential increase in internet traffic due to the increased availability of internet access as well as high demand activities (such as movie streaming) presents an enormous challenge to infrastructure in handling this increasing amount of data. The UCI researchers have developed an ultra-broadband transimpedance amplifier (TIA), which is a key component for coupling high-speed optical fiber to conventional metal wiring. The silicon-based circuit is capable of 50 Gbps data transfer, representing a 25% increase over other, state of the art devices.

Three-Dimensional NoC Reliability Evaluation Automated Tool (TREAT)

The invention is a reliability analysis framework designed specifically and uniquely for 3D Network-on-Chip platforms. Following an innovative methodology together with accurate modeling for smart dynamic faults injection, the invention can effectively be used to avoid costly redesigns through assessments at earlier design stages.

Mechanical Process For Creating Particles Using Two Plates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Physics and Astronomy have developed a novel method to lithograph two polished solid surfaces by using a simple mechanical alignment jig with piezoelectric control and a method of pressing them together and solidifying a material.

Two-Step Processing With Vapor Treatment Of Thin Films Of Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Materials

Prof. Yang and colleagues have developed a novel method of preparing organic-inorganic thin films using a solution process followed by vapor treatment, presenting a low-cost, high-performance solution method of producing optoelectronic devices.

Trademark: Flexible Fan Out Wafer Processing And Structure: Flextrate

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel biocompatible flexible device fabrication method using fan-out wafer level processing (FOWLP).

A Structure For Increasing Mobility In A High-Electron-Mobility Transistor

A technique that results in a significant increase of electron mobility and sheet charge density at small channel thickness.

Interleaved 3D On-Chip Differential Inductor And Transformer

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an interleaved three-dimensional (3D) on-chip differential inductors and transformers used in silicon based radio frequency/millimeter wave integrated circuits

On-Chip Tunable Artificial Dielectrics

UCLA Researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed and reduced-to-practice an innovative method for making chips with tunable dielectrics so the wavelength of RF signals can be modified to achieve frequency tuning effects without effecting noise interference.

All Microwave Stabilization Of Chip-Scale Frequency Combs

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an optical frequency comb technology using small, cheap components for high precision time, frequency, distance, and energy measurements.

High Performance and Flexible Chemical And Bio Sensors Using Metal Oxide Semiconductors

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a simple method producing thin, sensitive In2O3-based conformal biosensors based on field-effect transistors using facile solution-based processing for future wearable human technologies as well as non-invasive glucose testing.

Hemispherical Rectenna Arrays for Multi-Directional, Multi-Polarization, and Multi-Band Ambient RF Energy Harvesting

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a system that can receive RF waves in different frequency bands, from different directions, and with different polarizations to maximize energy harvested from ambient radio-frequency signals.

Advanced Chemical Sensing Method and Apparatus

Conventional chemical sensors or chemical resistors detect the molecule concentration by monitoring the resistance change caused by the reaction near the sensing material surface. One of the problems with these systems is with drift, when over time the analyte molecules poison the device’s sensing surface, causing weaker performance on selectivity and sensitivity. This often requires rigorous and timely calibrations to the sensor, which involves human intervention, and often times complete sensor replacement. To address this problem, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a vertical platform that dramatically improves the sensor’s ability to manage and recover from the poison environments. By examining and manipulating the sensing plane vis-à-vis the near field surface, researchers have demonstrated an effective and robust chemical sensing platform for a range of gas sensing applications.

Highly Wrinkled Metal Thin Films Using Lift-Off Layers

Wearable electronics are becoming a popular way of integrating personal healthcare with continuous, remote health monitoring, yet current devices are bulky and exhibit poor electronic performance. Wrinkled metal thin films can be utilized for their thin, flexible profiles, which conform well to the skin. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel method using specialized materials that results in wrinkled metal thin films that have enhanced mechanical and electrical performance.

Hybrid Growth Method for Improved III-Nitride Tunnel Junction Devices

Hybrid growth method for III-nitride tunnel junction devices that uses metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) to grow one or more light-emitting or light-absorbing structures and ammonia-assisted or plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to grow one or more tunnel junctions.

Frequency Discriminator-based Phase Noise Filter (PNF) for Ultra-Clean LO/Clock

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a phase noise filter (PNF) circuit with wide bandwidth and high sensitivity.

Terahertz (THz) Interconnect Semiconductor with High Energy and Bandwidth Density

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a sub-THz interconnect semiconductor that can operate at high bandwidth densities and high-energy efficiencies.

Hybrid SPST Switch Delivers High Isolation Over an Ultra-wide Bandwidth

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a hybrid, complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) mm-wave, single-polar single-throw (SPST) switch that combines the wide bandwidth features of a distributed structure and the compact implementation of coupled lump elements for an area-efficient layout.

Printable Repulsive-Force Electrostatic Actuator Methods and Device

Flexible electrostatic actuators are well designed for a range of commercial applications, from small micro-mechanical robotics to large vector displays or sound wall systems. Electrostatic actuation provides efficient, low-power, fast-response driving and control of movable nano-, micro-, and macro-structures. While commercially available electrostatic actuators have the requisite high levels of mechanical energy / force for some applications, their energy requirements are typically orders of magnitude higher than what is needed in large-area, low-power applications. Moreover, conventional approaches to these types of electrostatic actuators have limited design geometries and are prone to reliability issues like electrical shorts. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have experimented with planar electrostatic actuators using novel printing and electrode patterning and engineering techniques. The team has demonstrated a repulsive-force electrostatic actuator device (100 mm x 60 mm achieved) with extremely high field strength and high voltage operation and without insulator coatings or air breakdown.

RF-Powered Micromechanical Clock Generator

Realizing the potential of massive sensor networks requires overcoming cost and power challenges. When sleep/wake strategies can adequately limit a network node's sensor and wireless power consumption, then the power limitation comes down to the real-time clock (RTC) that synchronizes sleep/wake cycles. With typical RTC battery consumption on the order of 1µW, a low-cost printed battery with perhaps 1J of energy would last about 11 days. However, if a clock could bleed only 10nW from this battery, then it would last 3 years. To attain such a clock, researchers at UC Berkeley developed a mechanical circuit that harnesses squegging to convert received RF energy (at -58dBm) into a local clock while consuming less than 17.5nW of local battery power. The Berkeley design dispenses with the conventional closed-loop positive feedback approach to realize an RCT (along with its associated power consumption) and removes the need for a sustaining amplifier altogether. 

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