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Generation of an Improved Synthetic Splice Modulator (FDGLY) That Mirrors the Structural Features of the Potential CLL In Vitro Inhibitor FD-895

 An increasing body of research has shown that alternations in RNA splicing are involved in a number of human diseases, particularly cancer. Drug regulation of splicing has become an interesting new target for therapeutic discovery. A number of drug discovery efforts aimed at developing splicing-modulating small-molecules are being tested in clinic trials for cancer.

Modulation Of p53 as a Cancer Therapeutic Target

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have designed peptides and oligonucleotide sequences to enhance p53 expression.

Biologically Applicable Water-Soluble Heterogeneous Catalysts For Parahydrogen-Induced Polarization

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel method of parahydrogen-induced polarization in water using heterogeneous catalysts.

Determination Of Absolute Configuration Of Secondary Alcohols Using A Competing Enantioselective Conversion Kit

The absolute configuration of an organic compound dictates its interactions with other chemicals. The Competing Enantioselective Conversion (CEC) method is an attractive method for determining the absolute configuration of secondary alcohols, but the preparation of stock reagent solutions takes longer than the analysis time itself – a mere 1-2 hours. The inventors at UCI have developed a CEC kit which contains stock solutions of the components required for CEC that remain stable and usable for several months.

Sieve Container For Contactless Media Exchange For Cell Growth

Media that contains nutrients and growth factors is necessary to grow all types of cells, a process that is widely used in many fields of research. Such media should be routinely changed either to different media or a fresh batch of the same media. This change currently involves either using a pipette to transfer cells from their current dish of media to a new dish, or aspirating the media out of the dish and replacing it with new media. Both methods have inherent risks to stressing and damaging the cells. Researchers at UCI have developed a unique dish for growing cells that allows for safer aspiration of the old media, which reduces stress and damage to the cells.

Xenobiotic-Free Culture System To Expand Human Limbal Stem Cells

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Opthalmology have developed a xenobiotic-free manufacturing process to produce transplantable human limbal stem cells for use in treating limbal stem cell deficiency.

Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probe for Monitoring Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

Prof. Hui-wang Ai and colleagues at UCR have developed a new near-infrared fluorescent MMP probe that provides a number of advantages over current probes. Due to its improved chemistry the new probe, named NIMAP, delivers high sensitivity given its high fluorescence contrast and low background fluorescence. It has optimal emissions (above 600 nm) for mammalian in vivo and in vitro studies and improved accumulation within mitochondria which improves its quantitative analysis possibilities. NIMAP is also extremely photostable and can be utilized to monitor MMP for an extended period. Given these properties, NIMAP may be a powerful tool for studying MMP and mitochondrial function in various biological settings.

Next-generation broad-spectrum anti-cancer Rad51 inhibitors

This invention describes the design, synthesis and successful evaluation of a panel of novel Rad51 inhibitors to treat a broad spectrum of cancer types.

Small Molecule Generation of Multinucleated and Striated Myofibers from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Equivalent to Adult Skeletal Muscle

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have developed a novel means of generating adult skeletal muscle-equivalent myofibers from human pluripotent stem cells.

Siderophore-Based Immunization Against Gram-Negative Bacteria

Bacterial pathogens such as E. coli and Salmonella hijack the host’s iron to cause infection. This invention describes an immunization strategy for triggering an immune response against the iron-sequestering agent secreted by the pathogen, thus turning the bacterial virulence mechanism against itself, and thereby resulting in host immunity.

Improved Cell-Free Protein Synthesis For Protein Microarray

Researchers at UC Irvine have developed a cell-free (CF) protein synthesis system to solubilize and synthesize highly hydrophobic membrane proteins that would typically aggregate using current CF synthesis systems. With such high amounts of synthesized proteins, researchers intend to build protein microarrays for diagnostic purposes.

Antibodies targeting mammalian Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBP) 1 and 2

Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBP) are important factors that control lipid homeostasis in mammals. Researchers at UCI have prepared antibodies that have good affinity and specificity for human SREBP1/2 for use as research tools. These antibodies have application in genetic and immunotherapeutic research areas.

Rapid And Selective Cycloaddition Reaction For Applications In Molecular Imaging

UCLA researchers in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have designed a new reaction with 18F-chemistry platform, allowing a highly selective, efficient and rapid approach to label biomolecules with a chemical reporter (i.e. radionuclide, fluorescent dye) for molecular imaging.

Voltage-Sensitive Dyes In Living Cells

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Comprehensively mapping and recording the electrical inputs and outputs of multiple neurons simultaneously with cellular spatial resolution and millisecond time resolution remains an outstanding challenge in the field of neurobiology. Traditionally, electrophysiology is used to directly measure membrane potential changes. While this technique yields sensitive results, it is invasive and only permits single-cell recording.  VoltageFluor dyes rely on photoinduced electron transfer to effectively report membrane potential changes in cells. This approach allows for fast, sensitive and non-invasive recording of neuronal activity in cultured mammalian neurons and in ex-vivo tissue slices. However, one major limitation of small-molecule dye imaging is the inability to target the dye to specific cells of interest.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed latent voltage sensitive dyes that require a fluorogenic activation step. This new class of VoltageFluor dyes are only weakly fluorescent until being activated in defined cell types via biological processes. In particular, the VoltageFluor dyes described herein comprise a bioreversible group that quenches the fluorescence of the VoltageFluor dye, that upon selective removal by the action of biological processes (e.g., enzymes) thereby activates the fluorescence of the VoltageFluor dye. The researchers found that the new dye facilitated the observation of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal neurons.  

Preventing Protein Aggregation using Thermal Protectants

Protein aggregation in the brain are the causes of the neurodegenerative diseases Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. To study diseases and cellular mechanisms, biologists need to be able to efficiently synthesize, isolate and purify proteins. The invention herein is a synthetic nanoparticle (NP) that protects proteins from aggregation at temperatures, which normally cause aggregation. Furthermore, multiple stimuli can release the protein in high yield from the NPs.

Novel method for detection of O-Sulfonation sites on post-translationally modified proteins

Sulfonation of proteins and carbohydrates plays an important role in signaling, transport, and metabolism in the body. The degree to which a molecule is modified and at what positions dictates how that structure interacts within the body. UCI researchers have developed novel methods of detecting and mapping serine and threonine sulfonation of peptides and proteins.

Sensitive Probe for In Vitro Detection of A-beta Aggregates

The extreme sensitivity of Probe‐Enabled Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (PE‐FCS) can enable significantly improved sensitivity for monitoring the aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins vs. current methods which measure the fluorescence of the amyloid‐binding dye Thioflavin T (ThT) or Thioflavin S (ThS) using bulk fluorescence measurements. A significant limitation of the conventional method is that neither ThT nor ThS fluoresce appreciably over background fluorescence until the size and number of amyloid or amyloid‐like species is quite large. Hence, one cannot detect early formed aggregate intermediates that are implicated as the most active species involved in the pathology of amyloid‐associated diseases, such as Alzheimer’s Disease.

Novel Cyanobacteriochromes Responsive to Light in the Far-Red to Near-Infrared Region

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have identified new cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that detect and fluoresce in the far-red and near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

PHOTO-INDUCED ELECTRON TRANSFER VOLTAGE SENSITIVE DYES

The development of fluorescent indicators for sensing membrane potential can be a challenge.  Traditional methods to measure membrane potential rely on invasive electrodes, however, voltage imaging with fluorescent probes (VF) is an attractive solution because voltage imaging circumvents problems of low- throughput, low spatial resolution, and high invasiveness. Previously reported VF probes/dyes have proven useful in a number of imaging contexts. However, the design scheme for VF dyes remains elusive, due in part to our incomplete understanding of the biophysical properties influencing voltage sensitivity in our VoltageFluor scaffolds.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered new VF dyes, which are a small molecule platform for voltage imaging that operates via a photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) quenching mechanism to directly image transmembrane voltage changes.   The dyes further our understanding of the roles that membrane voltage plays, not only in excitable cells, such as neurons and cardiomyocytes, but also in non-excitable cells in the rest of the body.

Stimulus-responsive Polymers

Synthetic polymer constructs are an important tool in modern medical practice, but the lack of control over their activity limits their utility. The ability to combine structural function with localized interaction has proven extremely successful in stents, but polymer technology has not advanced sufficiently to serve a wider range of needs. PLGA polyesters can be degraded by hydrolysis facilitating their widespread use in medicine and biomedical research. Their dependence on slow hydrolysis makes for long degradation times (half-life of one year in vivo) limiting their applicability. While degradation can be sped up by copolymerization with more hydrophilic monomers; degradation is still too slow for triggered release or degradation.

Pyrite Shrink-Wrap Laminate As A Hydroxyl Radical Generator

The invention is a diagnostic technology, as well as a research and development tool. It is a simple, easy to operate, and effective platform for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and biological species. Specifically, this platform generates hydroxyl radicals for oxidative footprinting – a technique commonly employed in protein mapping and analysis. The platform itself is inexpenisve to fabricate, scalable, and requires nothing more than an ordinary pipet to use. In addition, it is highly amenable to scale-up, multiplexing, and automation, and so it holds promise as a high-throughput method for mapping protein structure in support of product development, validation, and regulatory approval in the protein-based therapeutics industry.

Novel 3D Stem Cell Culture Systems

Many disorders result in tissue degeneration, including Parkinson’s disease, heart attacks, and liver failure. One promising approach to treat these disorders is cell replacement therapy, which would implant new cells or tissues to replace those damaged by disease. Cell replacement therapy relies on stem cells, which are able to differentiate into a wide number of mature cell types. However, cell replacement therapies require large numbers of cells to clinically develop and commercialize, and the current stem cell culture methods are problematic in multiple ways, including low cell yields in 2D and poorly defined culture components. By culturing stem cells three-dimensionally, instead of two-dimensionally, far larger numbers of cells can be generated. Current three-dimensional culturing systems, however, often exert harmful shear stresses and pressures on the cells, have harsh cell recovery steps, do thus not generate large cell yields.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed new materials intended for use in fully chemically defined processes for large-scale growth and differentiation of stem cells. These materials prevent harsh cell recovery steps, and can be used in a defined, highly tunable, and three-dimensional cell culture system. 

Multi-Channel Microfluidic Piezoelectric Impact Printer

High-throughput, automated, large-scale microarray format assay in a short time frame and at low cost.

Dielectrophoresis-Based Cell Destruction to Eliminate/Remove Unwanted Subpopulations of Cells

This invention allows for label free cell separations and cell enrichment.

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