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Immunotherapy For HIV/AIDS

Chronic HIV infection results in exhaustion and loss of the immune system, a phenomenon characterized by dysfunctional HIV-specific killer T cells. The exhausted T cells display inhibitory proteins on their surface, and scientists hope to be able to restore immune function by interfering with the negative signals transmitted by such proteins. PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3, some examples of T-cell exhaustion markers that are associated with immune activation. In fact, expression of multiple inhibitory receptors has been demonstrated to correlate positively with both plasma viral load and disease progression in HIV infected individuals. However, little is known about the development and maintenance, as well as heterogeneity of immune cell exhaustion. Another problem with chronic HIV infection is that a large number of people that are receiving antiviral therapy (ART) become resistant to treatment. 

Novel Synthesis of Streptogramin A Antibiotics

A modular, scalable, chemical synthesis platform that produces new Streptogramin A class antibiotic candidates.

Antibacterial Polypeptide with Broad-Spectrum Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Activity

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a polypeptide that kills pathogenic bacteria.

Rational Design of Aminoglycoside-Based Antibiotics

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have designed a novel class of antibiotics that are effective against resistant bacterial infections.

Safe Potent Single Platform Vaccine Against Tier 1 Select Agents and Other Pathogens

UCLA researchers in the Department of Medicine have developed a novel vaccine platform against Tier 1 Select Agents to prevent infectious diseases such as tularemia, anthrax, plague, and melioidosis.

Nanoparticles For Specific Detection And Killing of Pathogenic Bacteria

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Medicine have developed novel functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles that can specifically identify pathogenic bacteria and deliver on-target drug treatments.

Systems And Methods For Therapeutic Agent Delivery

UCLA researchers at the Department of Physics have developed a system that is capable of delivering a therapeutic agent to a specifically targeted tissue using ultrasound.

Disulfide Bioconjugation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have proposed a one-step radical mechanism for disulfide bioconjugation that overcomes many concerns associated with the free cysteine residues that result from current bioconjugation techniques.

Endogenous Human Protein Nanoparticle-Based Immune-Focusing Antiviral Vaccine

UCLA researchers in the Department of Biological Chemistry have developed a novel nanoparticle based antiviral vaccine capable of targeting many viruses.

Development Of Surface Enhanced Graphene Oxide For Ubiquitous Antibacterial Coatings

UCLA researchers in the Department of Medicine have developed a novel graphene oxide (GO) based material with significantly enhanced antibacterial effects with maximized surface display of carbon radicals.

Metabolic Requirements for Alternative Macrophage Activation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology have discovered that Coenzyme A is a targetable requirement for anti-inflammatory macrophage differentiation.

Vaccines Incorporating Host or Viral Il-10 for Inducing Therapeutic Immune Responses

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed vaccines that incorporate host or viral Interleukin 10 (IL-10) to drive therapeutic immune responses.

CMV Vectors with an Inactivated Viral IL-10 Gene and Coding for a Foreign Antigen

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have developed CMV vectors with an inactivated viral IL-10 gene and additionally code for a foreign protein.

Composition Of Matter And Method For Leptospirosis Vaccine

Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread diseases estimated to infect up to 7-10 million people per year worldwide (2014) that can be transmitted from animals to humans. The most common transmission is via the urine of rodents or domestic animals that contaminates water or soil. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infection and currently there is not an efficient vaccine present to combat this disease. The disease is caused by Leptospira, a genus of the spirochaete bacteria of which there are ~13 pathogenic species that effect humans. The signs and symptoms of the disease are quite variable and can range from mild headaches, muscle pains, and fevers to the more severe form which causes bleeding from the lungs.

Disposable and Semi-Disposable Medical Consumables for Infection Control

In the United States lives are lost every year due to the spread of infections in hospitals and healthcare facilities. Thus, healthcare workers must take all precautions to prevent the spread of infectious diseases, especially in surgical spaces. One key step in this process is to control environmental surfaces because certain types of microbial bacteria or fungi are capable of surviving on environmental surfaces for months at a time. A potential solution would be to use consumables that are disposable, or semi-disposable, and offer a platform of products for the purposes of infection control.  

Development of a Novel cAMP–Inhibitor that Restores Epithelial and/or Endothelial Barrier Integrity in Human Cells Infected by Pathogenic Bacteria

Pathogenic bacteria have evolved elaborate and clever ways to enter our cells and breach the protection offered by our innate immune system. To initiate disease, many bacterial toxins target a specific cell, usually by binding to a receptor and thereby gaining access to the cytoplasm to promote pathogenesis. Interestingly, a set of toxins produced by diverse bacterial species act by distinct mechanisms to dramatically increase the intracellular concentration of cAMP. This striking evolutionary convergence suggests that overproduction of this second messenger represents a successful strategy to promote growth and dissemination of infectious agents, as well as disease symptoms. The organisms that produce these toxins that disrupt cAMP include:  Bacillus anthracis (B.a. and Anthrax edema toxin- ET, LT), Bordetella pertussis (CyaA), and Vibrio cholerae (Ctx) will be the focus of this study.     Current therapies to alleviate symptoms of cholera and anthrax are less than adequate and demonstrate that there is an urgent need for updated strategies and therapies for the treatment of these pathogenic diseases.

Label-Free Digital Bright Field Analysis of DNA Amplification

UCLA researchers in the department of Bioengineering have developed a novel method for quantitative analysis of DNA amplification products.

Antibody Selection to Prevent or Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Therapeutic antibodies have been developed to prevent or slow the cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but with limited clinical success to date. These treatment failures suggest that antibodies vary in their therapeutic efficacy and that more effective antibodies or combinations of antibodies need to be identified. To address this issue, researchers at UCI have developed a novel screening platform that can identify antibodies that may prevent or treat AD or other neurodegenerative disorders with high efficacy from human blood.

Genome-Wide Identification Of Immune Evasion Functions In A Virus

UCLA researchers in the Department of Pharmacology have discovered a novel approach toward generating live attenuated influenza vaccines with improved immune response in vivo.

Development of Novel Inhibitors of New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)

Antibiotic-resistance in pathogenic bacteria has become a critical public health threat. A major mechanism of antibiotic resistance is microbial degradation of drugs by enzymes such as β-lactamases which degrade the β-lactam ring of β-lactam antibiotics, namely penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems and monobactams, inactivating them. There are four different molecular classes of β-lactamases (A-D). Three classes of β-lactamases (A, C, and D) utilize an active-site serine in covalent mechanisms that can be targeted by β-lactamase inhibitors coformulated with β-lactam drugs. In contrast, class B consists of metallo-β- lactamases (MBLs) that utilize one or two active site Zn(II) ion(s) to catalyze the hydrolysis of the β-lactam ring. The emergence of carbapenemase producing bacteria, especially New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) and its variants, worldwide, has raised a major public health concern. NDM-1 hydrolyzes a wide range of β-lactam antibiotics, imipenem, meropenem, ertapenem, gentamicin, amikacin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin including carbapenems, which are the last resort of antibiotics for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria such as carbanenem-resistant Enterobacteriacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Currently, there are Inhibitors of NDM-1, both of which have liabilities, either due to adverse effects in mammals or off-target inhibitory activity. Therefore, a new type of NDM-1 inhibitor is needed.

Vaccine Against Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections affect billions of patients worldwide and can manifest its symptoms as painful blisters or ulcers at oral, ocular or genital locations. Symptomatic patients can currently only alleviate their pains with antiviral medication. This technology proposes a shift in focus toward novel protective epitopes as the foundation for new vaccines.

Novel Biomarker Panel for the Early Diagnosis of Lyme Disease

This diagnostic technology uses a panel of 20 biomarkers to diagnose Lyme disease with much higher sensitivity and accuracy than other currently existing methods. Lyme disease can be detected in peripheral blood samples from patients even at early hard-to-diagnose stages. These aspects of the invention make it indispensable for speeding up recovery and prevention of complications associated with this debilitating illness such as carditis, arthritis, neurological illness and even death.

Inhibitors Of Zika Virus

UCLA researchers in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Pathology have identified sulfonamide-based small molecules that show anti-Zika activity at low nanomolar range.

A Prognostic Biomarker For Coccidioidomycosis

UCLA researchers in the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology have identified a prognostic biomarker for Coccidioidomycosis.

Novel Inhibitor of HIV Replication

UCLA researchers in the David Geffen School of Medicine have discovered a new small molecule inhibitor for HIV-1 replication.

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