Learn more about UC TechAlerts – Subscribe to categories and get notified of new UC technologies

Browse Category: Medical > Disease: Cardiovascular and Circulatory System

Categories

[Search within category]

Proteoglycan Mimetics For Enhanced Wound Healing Angiogenesis And Vascular Repair

Researchers at the University of California, Davis We have developed proteoglycan mimetics that alters the extracellular environment to promote local vascular repair and wound healing.

Serologic Assay For Silent Brain Ischemia

UCLA researchers in the Department of Neurology have identified a series of blood-secreted protein biomarkers indicative of cerebral endothelial blood vessel damage that occur in the setting of obesity and metabolic diseases.

An Improved Phase-Contrast MRI Technique

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiological Sciences have developed a phase-contrast MRI acquisition technique called Hybrid One- and Two-sided Flow Encoding Only (HOTFEO).

Development of Novel Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Allosteric Modulators

The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a very important family of cell surface receptors that respond to extracellular signals which then transduce those signals into intracellular responses.  They are also the largest family of targets of currently available therapeutics. Adrenergic receptors belong to the GPCR superfamily and their natural ligands are the catecholamines, epinephrine and norepinephrine. Adrenergic receptors can be further divided into two receptor subfamilies, α and β that exhibit differences in tissue distribution, ligand specificity and cellular output. The β adrenergic receptors (βARs) are important mediators in diseases like asthma, Parkinson’s disease, hypertension and heart failure. Therefore, there is a direct need for new modulators for the βARs receptors.

The Therapeutic Use of Human Oligosaccharides to Treat Atherosclerosis and/or Hyperlipidemia

In the United States and most other developed countries, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of illness and death. In 2015, cardiovascular disease, primarily coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis that affects the arteries supplying blood to the heart) and stroke, caused almost 15 million deaths worldwide, making atherosclerosis the leading cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerosis means hardening of the arteries due to the presence of plaques, which are deposits of fatty materials. Atherosclerosis can affect the medium-sized and large arteries of the brain, heart, kidneys, other vital organs, and legs. Atherosclerosis begins when an injured artery wall creates chemical signals that cause certain types of white blood cells (monocytes and T cells) to attach to the wall of the artery. These cells move into the wall of the artery. There they are transformed into foam cells, which collect cholesterol and other fatty materials and trigger growth of smooth muscle cells in the artery wall. In time, these fat-laden foam cells accumulate. They form patchy deposits (atheromas, also called plaques) covered with a fibrous cap in the lining of the artery wall. With time, calcium accumulates in the plaques. Plaques may be scattered throughout medium-sized and large arteries, but they usually start where the arteries branch. Existing treatment options for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease are aimed at lowering Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by either increasing hepatic LDLR expression by using statins and PCSK9 inhibitors, or by reducing cholesterol absorption by using ezetimibe. Further development of therapeutic strategies is warranted due to various drawbacks and limitations using the current therapeutic options.

Multi Layered Microfluidic Devices For In Vitro Large Scale Perfused Capillary Networks

"Organ-on-a-chip” technologies allow recapitulation of organ systems in vitro and can be utilized for drug response and toxicity studies, which are required in preclinical studies. However, current recapitulations via “organ-on-a-chip” technologies are limited because the designs do not fully reflect physiological complexity. To address this, UC Irvine inventors have developed a device to better mimic the vascular network of the circulatory system.

A Delivery System for Percutaneous Delivery and Implantation Of Atrioventricular Heart Valves

The invention is a novel delivery system providing a minimally invasive solution for the delivery and implantation of atrioventricular heart valves. Through its novel mechanical structure, the invention delivers and positions the valve accurately with no need for painful surgeries or bulky tools.

In Utero Prevention Of Congenital Heart Disease By Metabolic Intervention

UCLA researchers in the Department of Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology have discovered a method of preventing congenital heart disease through in utero treatment.

Calcium Scoring Using Parallel Tomosynthesis

Researchers at UCLA in the Department of Radiology have developed a cheaper and safer way to measure coronary calcium levels to predict heart disease.

Potent TMEM16A Small Molecule Treatment for Inflammatory and Reactive Airway Diseases, Asthma, Hypertension, Pain and Cancer

A novel class of 2-acylamino-cycloalkylthiophene-3-carboxylic acid arylamides (AACTs) as potent TMEM16A inhibitors

Oral Microsensor Arrays for Remote Monitoring of Salivary Electrolytes for Precision Healthcare

UCLA researchers in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery have developed a novel microsensor system for unobtrusive monitoring of oral pH and electrolytes levels. This system is integrated into a data analysis and feedback network for disease prevention and precision care.

A New Catheter Design for Precise Stent Delivery

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiological Sciences have designed a catheter that increases stent delivery precision.

Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase-Conditioned Stem Cells for Cardiac Cell-Based Therapy

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have adapted novel soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEHI) inhibitors as adjuvant treatment in cardiac cell-based therapy to improve the survival and engraftment of stem cells by pre-conditioning with the sEHI in vitro.

A Potent and Selective FXIa Inhibitor as a Next-generation Antithrombotic Drug

UCSF partnered with Pfizer’s Centers for Therapeutic Innovation (CTI) to identify an IND-ready antibody directed towards the treatment of thrombotic disease. The asset is a fully human antibody targeting the coagulation cascade serine protease FXIa for currently underserved thrombotic disease indications. A potent reversal agent has also been developed.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Arteriovenous Malformations

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Molecular, Cell, and Development Biology & Surgery have identified Angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2) as a marker and potentially a strong contributing factor to the clinical presentation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

AGPAT5 as a Molecular Mediator of Insulin Resistance

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Medicine and Cardiology have identified a novel gene and pathway in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and discovered an inhibitor of this gene useful for treating AGPAT5-related diseases.

Bidirectional IVC Filter

Researchers at UCLA from the Department of Radiology have developed an improved IVC filter with better filtering performance that is easily retrievable.

Half-Virtual-Half-Physical Microactuator

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a half-virtual-half-physical microactuator that utilizes a combination of computational models and microelectromechanical systems for use in medical devices and mechanical systems.

Novel Targets And Use Of Small Molecule BT-2 To Treat Heart Failure, Obesity And Diabetes

UCLA researchers from the Cardiovascular Theme in the Departments of Anesthesiology, Physiology and Medicine have discovered new pathways and potential treatment options for heart failure, obesity, and diabetes

A Gene Therapy Strategy To Restore Electrical And Cardiac Function In Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a predominantly genetic-based heart disease characterized by right but also recently left ventricular dysfunction, fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium leading to fatal/severe ventricular arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death in young people and athletes. ARVC is responsible for 10% of sudden cardiac deaths in people ≥65 years of age and 24% in people ≤30 years of age. ARVC is thought to be a rare disease as it occurs in 1 in 1000-5000 people, although the prevalence may be higher as some patients are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed due to poor diagnostic markers. Growing evidence also reveals earlier onset since pediatric populations ranging from infants to children in their teens are also particularly vulnerable to ARVC, highlighting the critical need to identify and treat patients at an earlier stage of the disease.At present there are no effective treatments for ARVC nor has there been any randomized clinical trials conducted to examine treatment modalities, screening regimens, or medications specific for ARVC. As a result, treatment strategies for ARVC patients are directed at symptomatic relief of electrophysiological defects, based on clinical expertise, results of retrospective registry-based studies, and the results of studies on model systems. The current standard of care is the use of anti-arrhythmic drugs (sotalol, amniodarone and beta-blockers) that transition into more invasive actions, which include implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac catheter ablation, if the patient becomes unresponsive or intolerant to anti-arrhythmic therapies. However, current therapeutic modalities have limited effectiveness in managing the disease, 40% of ARVC patients (a young heart disease) die within 10-11 years after initial diagnosis, highlighting the need for development of more effective therapies for patients with ARVC.

Mobile Phone Based Fluorescence Multi-Well Plate Reader

UCLA researchers have developed a novel mobile phone-based fluorescence multi-well plate reader.

Vessel Cross-Sectional Area Measurements Using CT Angiography

A new approach to visualizing small and stenotic vasculature not readily visible with modern day diagnostic computed tomography angiography.

Single Ended Draw Lines For Medical Device Application

Minimizing the movement of deployed transcatheter heart valves and stents during detachment using single ended draw lines.

Ultrasound-Guided Delivery System For Accurate Positioning - Repositioning Of Transcatheter Heart Valves

Utilizing intravascular ultrasound for accurate placement of transcatheter heart valves to improve surgical outcomes.

Novel Nanoliposomal Nitroglycerin Formulation for Cardiovascular Therapies

    To address this major limitation, investigators at UCR have developed a nanoliposomal formulation of NTG, which achieves a 70-fold increase in the anti-inflammatory effect of NTG when compared to NTG. This increase in potency allows lower doses to be effective, which could mitigate the common issues seen with high clinical doses of NTG viz. loss of NTG sensitivity and endothelial toxicity. Fig. 1 Adhesion of U937 monocytes to NO-deficient (L-NIO-treated) ECs is significantly blocked by treating ECs with 5 ug/ml nanoliposomal nitroglycerin (NTG-NL). L-NIO is a selective eNOS inhibitor.  Remarkably, this anti-inflammatory dose of NTG in nanoliposomes is 70-fold lower than the dose of free NTG (5uM) required to achieve a similar effect

  • Go to Page: