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Novel Methodology To Convert Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scan Data To Be Used In Proton Beam Therapy

This invention is a novel model that uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) information to more accurately determine the irradiation area using proton beam therapy (PBT) for oncological treatment.

Generation of an Improved Synthetic Splice Modulator (FDGLY) That Mirrors the Structural Features of the Potential CLL In Vitro Inhibitor FD-895

 An increasing body of research has shown that alternations in RNA splicing are involved in a number of human diseases, particularly cancer. Drug regulation of splicing has become an interesting new target for therapeutic discovery. A number of drug discovery efforts aimed at developing splicing-modulating small-molecules are being tested in clinic trials for cancer.

Structurally Validated Anti-avß8 Antibodies for Targeting TGFß for Immunotherapy

This invention provides highly efficient antibodies whose epitopes and mechanism of action have been structurally defined against integrin αvβ8. These antibodies have been designed to be used as therapeutic for cancer. Other antibodies have been designed as companion diagnostic tools.

Novel Covalent Inhibitors Of GTP And GDP-bound RAS

This invention describes a novel class of direct Ras inhibitors that bind and inhibit this oncogene in its GTP and GDP-bound states.

A New Class of mTOR Inhibitors for Targeted Treatment of Anti-cancer, Anti-aging, and Anti-autism and Regenerative Medicine

Novel hybrid inhibitors of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin kinase) that selectively target mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) and completely inhibit downstream phosphorylation of its substrates for cancer treatment as well as regenerative medicine, aging and autism (TSC mutations).

A Novel CRISPR-based Screen for Personalized Cancer Therapy

Disease phenotypes are often regulated by interwoven genetic networks. For example, tumor genomes exhibit an extensive variety of genetic and epigenetic changes involved in tumor initiation, metastasis and ultimately, resistance to therapy. Combination therapy to target multiple pathways, as opposed to only single ones, can enhance treatment efficacy. Discovering effective combination therapies for human diseases is challenging with existing methods, due to the cost, effort, and labor required to construct and analyze each combination. There is a need for technological advances to accelerate the identification of effective combinatorial therapies. CRISPR has emerged as a new tool to systemically interrogate cancer genomes and set up the potential for personalized medicine. Personalized medicine is based upon the concept that individual differences can be identified and used to the patient’s advantage for therapy.

mTORC2 Specific Inhibitors

UCLA researchers have identified and characterized mTORC2-specific inhibitors useful as a novel treatment of glioblastoma.

Use of ApoA-1 to Treat and Prevent Pro-Inflammatory Conditions

UCLA researchers in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology have discovered that ApoA-I can be used to treat and prevent pro-inflammatory skin conditions.

Small Molecule Treatment for Androgen Inhibitor-Resistant Cancers

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed small molecule inhibitors of androgen receptor variants for the treatment of androgen inhibitor-resistant cancers.

Handled Blood-Flow Imaging Device

The invention is a medical handheld device that carries out skin visual inspection simultaneously with blood flow measurements through integrating a Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) system within a handheld compact dermoscope. Combining both features in one compact, cheap and easy to use device will generate accurate and elaborative functional data that will improve the accuracy and detection of diseases such as cancer.

Small Molecules for Melanoma Treatment

Traditional anti-cancer treatments used for metastatic melanoma (skin cancer) can result in cell toxicity, poor efficacy, and low patient survival. UCI researchers have uncovered a class of potent compounds that inhibit cancer cell growth and induce cancer cell death by targeting RhoJ signaling pathways.

Bispecific Antibodies for Detection and Treatment of Cancers Associated with EGFR Overexpression

This invention identifies novel bispecific antibodies that can be used to detect and/or treat various cancers that overexpress EGFR family of proteins.

Polyketide Synthase Variants And Uses Thereof

Polyketide synthases are multifunctional enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of polyketides. These enzymes make attractive targets because they can be modified to produce commodity chemicals. The invention herein describes methods for producing polyketide synthase variants whose activity and/or substrate specificity can be tailored. An example of a polyketide synthase variant would be 2-pyrone synthase, which produces 2-pyrone. Other modified synthase variants can be generated to produce other key materials including ketides, lactones, etc.

Novel Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal Nanopillared Surface

Medical devices are susceptible to contamination by harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, which form biofilms on device surfaces. These biofilms are often resistant to antibiotics and other current treatments, resulting in over 2 million people per year suffering from diseases related to these contaminating microbes. Death rates for many of these diseases are high, often exceeding 50%. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel anti-bacterial and anti-fungal biocomposite that incorporates a nanopillared surface structure that can be applied as a coating to medical devices.

A Prognostic And Diagnostic Algorithm For Various Molecular Subtypes Of Breast Cancers, Including Her2 Positive And Triple Negative Breast Cancers (TNBCs)

Breast cancer is second leading cause of death among women in the United States in 2016 and It is estimated to be responsible for over 40,000 deaths in 2017 (ACS). The use of biomarkers plays a key role in the management of patients with breast cancer, especially in the decision process to select the appropriate systemic therapy to be administered. Furthermore, the discovery of new tissue-based and gene biomarkers has led to the development of a “molecular signature” for predicting patient outcome and treatment modalities. There are three subtypes of breast cancer that are determined by performing specific tests on a sample of the tumor. The first subtype is a tumor that is positive/negative for a hormone receptor, either estrogen (ER) and/or progesterone (PR); tumors without these receptors are classified “hormone receptor-negative”. The second subtype is characterized by the overexpression the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein on the tumor.  HER2 proteins are receptors on normal breast cells and help control the growth, but when overexpressed make the tumor grow faster and are designated HER2-positive tumors. The last subtype is designated triple-negative, since it does not express ER, PR, and/or HER2. 

Chemical Synthesis of Lipid Mediator 22-HDoHE and Structural Analogs

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an efficient method to chemically synthesize the endogenous lipid mediator, 22-hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (22-HDoHE) which can be applied to related natural mediators and analogs.

Genetic Mechanisms Of Resistance To Anti-Pd-1/L1

UCLA researchers have identified a rare genetic mutation in the interferon receptor signaling pathway that can be used as a diagnostic to predict whether a patient will be or has become resistant to a cancer immunotherapy.

Rapid Screening and Identification of Antigenic Components in Tissues and Organs

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an approach to rapidly screen and identify antigenic components in tissues and organs.

Novel Inhibitors of Mitochondrial Electron Transport

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a class of compounds that both bind to a unique newly-discovered binding site in respiratory complex III and act as inhibitors of electron transport for use as mitochondrial anti-cancer drugs.

Modulation Of p53 as a Cancer Therapeutic Target

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have designed peptides and oligonucleotide sequences to enhance p53 expression.

Developing Physics-Based High-Resolution Head And Neck Biomechanical Models

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the David Geffen School of Medicine have developed a new computational method to model head and neck movements during medical imaging/treatment procedures.

Fine Needle Device For The Measurement Of Material Properties

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry have developed a device that allows for quantitative and sensitive assessment of tissues (i.e. tumors) and materials based on local variations in elastic, friction, and cutting forces on needle insertion.

Anti-Androgens for the Treatment of Chemotherapy Resistant Prostate Cancers

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a special class of androgen inhibitors for the treatment of chemotherapeutic prostate resistant cancers.

Microfluidics Device For Digestion Of Tissues Into Cellular Suspension

A microfluidic device that separates single cells from whole tissue in a rapid and gentle manner using hydrodynamic fluid flow. The separated single cell suspensions can then be used in tissue engineering applications, regenerative medicine and the study of cancer.

Sieve Container For Contactless Media Exchange For Cell Growth

Media that contains nutrients and growth factors is necessary to grow all types of cells, a process that is widely used in many fields of research. Such media should be routinely changed either to different media or a fresh batch of the same media. This change currently involves either using a pipette to transfer cells from their current dish of media to a new dish, or aspirating the media out of the dish and replacing it with new media. Both methods have inherent risks to stressing and damaging the cells. Researchers at UCI have developed a unique dish for growing cells that allows for safer aspiration of the old media, which reduces stress and damage to the cells.

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