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TRM:Sox9CreER BAC Transgenic Mice

These transgenic mice express an inducible version of cre recombinase mice under the direction of a Sox9 promoter. They are suitable for performing cre-recombination in pancreatic ductal cells and their progenitors.

Propagation of Sexual Crops with Fixed Hybrid Vigor

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to propagate hybrid crops through seeds that allow for the fixation of hybrid vigor.

Engineering Polyketide Synthase Machinery in Cyanobacteria

Complex polyketides include a family of natural products that possess a wide variety of pharmacological or biological activities. Numerous polyketides and their semisynthetic derivatives have been approved for clinical use in humans or animals, including antibiotics, antifungal agents, immunosuppressants, antiparasitic agents and insecticides. All these natural products share a common mechanism of biosynthesis and are produced by a class of enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs). Besides their essential role in the biosynthesis of a vast diversity of natural products, the versatility of PKSs can be further emphasized as they can be redesigned and repurposed to produce novel molecules that could be used as fuels, industrial chemicals, and monomers. Most polyketide producers are slow-growing, recalcitrant to genetic manipulation, or even non-culturable.

Plants Resistant to Fungal Disease

University of California, Riverside researcher Prof. Hailing Jin and her colleagues have developed plants that are resistant to Botrytis cineria and Verticillium dahlia. These plants are genetically engineered to silence fungal pathogens that transfer “virulent” small RNA effectors to the plant that cause disease.  This has led to the development of plants that are resistant to Botrytis cineria and Verticillium dahlia. Fig. 1 shows fruits (bottom) with dramatic reductions in gray mold disease. Gray mold disease is caused by Botrytis cineria. The bottom fruits were sprayed with small RNA (sRNA) against Botrytis cineria pathogens dicer-like 1 & 2 (BcDCL). The top fruits were sprayed with water and this conferred no protection against gray mold disease. Immunity to pathogens may be genetically engineered into plants to express BcDCL-1 and BcDCL-2.

Gene Drive System to Control D. suzukii Flies

Prof. Omar Akbari and his lab at UCR have developed a gene drive system using a synthetic maternal effect dominant embryonic arrest element (Medea) to control D. suzukii.  The engineered Medea element is a maternal toxin coupled to a tightly linked embryonic “antidote”.   Female D. suzukii transformed with the Medea element and antidote deposit a toxin into all oocytes.  Should the embryo inherit a Medea element, it may inhibit the toxin’s lethality by expressing miRNAs as an antidote that targets the toxin.  Embryos without a Medea element are not able to counter the effects of the toxin and do not survive past the embryonic stage.The lab has also tested the transgenic D. suzukii Medea in eight geographically distinct populations and showed that the overall transmission rate of the Medea element in each population was 94.2%.  This suggests that D. suzukii Medea should be able to drive robust population replacement and cause a population crash by spreading Medea through a population and making it infertile.

An Efficient Gene Editing Approach to Create Transgene-free Mutant Plants

Effective isolation of targeted mutations generated by CRISPR/Cas9 requires not only reasonable editing efficiency, but also an easy method to screen for the mutations. Editing events generated by CRISPR/Cas9 are normally identified by restriction enzyme digestion of PCR fragments or by in vitro digestion using purified Cas9 protein. Both methods are time-consuming and laborious. Simplified screening methods are urgently needed.

Rapid Screening and Identification of Antigenic Components in Tissues and Organs

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an approach to rapidly screen and identify antigenic components in tissues and organs.

Gene Delivery Into Mature Plants Using Carbon Nanotubes

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Current methods of biomolecule delivery to mature plants are limited due to the presence of plant cell wall, and are additionally hampered by low transfection efficiency, high toxicity of the transfection material, and host range limitation. For this reason, transfection is often limited to protoplast cultures where the cell wall is removed, and not to the mature whole plant.  Unfortunately, protoplasts are not able to regenerate into fertile plants, causing these methods to have low practical applicability. Researchers at the University of California have developed a method for delivery of genetic materials into mature plant cells within a fully-developed mature plant leaf, that is species-independent. This method utilizes a nano-sized delivery vehicle for targeted and passive transport of biomolecules into mature plants of any plant species. The delivery method is inexpensive, easy, and robust, and can transfer biomolecules into all phenotypes of any plant species with high efficiency and low toxicity.

Label Free Assessment Of Embryo Vitality

Researchers at UC Irvine developed an independent non-invasive method to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy embryos.

Xylosyl-Xylitol Oligomers And Their Microbial And Enzymatic Productions

Lignocellulosic biomass derived from plant cell walls is the most abundant raw material for biofuels and renewable chemicals production.  Hemicellulose comprises about 30% of the total weight of lignocellulosic biomass. In contrast to cellulose, hemicellulose components are readily depolymerized into short oligomers and released into the liquid phase during pretreatment.  It is of great interest to convert the released hemicellulose components into fuels or other value-add chemicals for building an economical biomass conversion process. There are ten times more microorganisms than human cells in a healthy adult.  The symbiosis between the microbiome and human organs is increasingly recognized as a major player in health and well-being.  Xylooligosaccharides and xylitol, both derived from hemicellulose, can benefit gut flora and oral flora, respectively. Xylooligosaccharides (XOS, also called xylodextrins) are naturally occurring oligosaccharides, found in bamboo shoots, fruits, vegetables, milk and honey.  Industrial scale production of XOS can be carried out with much less expensive lignocellulosic materials by hydrothermal treatment or enzymatic hydrolysis.  A broad range of applications of XOS have been demonstrated, including as functional food, prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal infections, animal feed for fish and poultry, agricultural yield enhancer and ripening agent, and as active agents against osteoporosis, pruritus cutaneous, otitis, and skin and hair disorders.  In the current market, the most important applications of XOS correspond to ingredients for functional foods as a prebiotic, or formulated as synbiotics. XOS has been shown to promote beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium adolescentis growth in vitro and in vivo.  It has been estimated that the prebiotics market will reach $4.8 billion by 2018. Xylitol is another hemicellulose-derived compound beneficial to human health.  For many bacteria and yeasts, the uptake of non-utilizable xylitol interferes with hexose utilization, which helps the human body to rebuild a healthy microbiome.  Xylitol has been used to prevent middle ear infections and tooth decay.  In addition, xylitol possesses 33% fewer calories but similar sweetness compared to sucrose and has been widely used as a substitute sweetener.  While chemical hydrogenation of xylose remains the major industrial method of xylitol production, microbial fermentation has become more popular in the newly built plants due to lower conversion cost. There exists a need for improved methods of producing xylooligosaccharides and related compounds, such as xylooligosaccharides with xylitol components.    UC researchers discovered a new set of fungal metabolic intermediates, named xylosyl-xylitol oligomers and developed the enzymatic and microbial fermentation method to produce such compounds. The detection and purification methods have also been developed.

Enhanced Cell/Bead Encapsulation Via Acoustic Focusing

The invention consists of a multi-channel, droplet-generating microfluidic device with a strategically placed feature. The feature vibrates in order to counteract particle-trapping micro-vortices formed in the device. Counteracting these vortices allows for single particle encapsulation in the droplets formed by the device and makes this technology a good candidate for use in single cell diagnostics and drug delivery systems.

Methods For High Signal-To-Noise Imaging Of Chromosomal Loci In Cells Using Fluorescent Cas9

Cas9 is an endonuclease that binds complementary target DNA and generates site-specific breaks using two conserved nuclease domains. By inactivating both nuclease domains, dCas9 is produced, which functions as a programmable DNA binding protein. Current methods use dCas9-GFP fusions to image chromosomal loci, but have insufficient signal-to-noise ratio and often misidentify loci. UC Berkeley researchers have engineered a Cas9 variant that can be labeled with small molecule fluorescent dyes. This variant utilizes a conformational change in Cas9 to provide highly specific identification of chromosomal loci, and has been shown to work in a proof-of-principle experiment using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pairs.

Novel and Effective Method of Developing Recombinant Proteins

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a novel method to produce and recover high limits of recombinant protein from leaf tissue.

Novel Peptide Capable of Stimulating Disease Resistance in Plants

Pamela Ronald and researchers at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have discovered raxX, a novel peptide that activates the Xa21 immune response pathway, capable of conferring robust disease resistance, and methods for its use. Application of the peptide activates the plant immune responses and eliminating bacterial infection. Engineering plants to express both raxX and Xa21 under an inducible control is expected to lead to robust resistance in diverse plant species.

Methods for Selecting Plants After Genome Editing

Researchers at UC Davis have discovered methods of selecting plants with targeted genome edits without resorting to tissue culture or selectable transgenes. The resulting method is a non-transgenic approach that avoids the off-target background mutations generated by selection in tissue culture.

Improving Plant Stress Tolerance through Chloroplast Stability Control

Chloroplast vesiculation can be down-regulated to increase plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress. Conversely, up-regulation of the same process enhances nutrient assimilation in young tuber, seed, root and fruit tissue. The resulting invention allows the creation of plants having greater stress tolerance, or higher nutritional content, or both.

Reversible Chemoenzymatic Protein Labeling

Some of nature’s most complex molecules are made by cellular factories that rely on an acyl carrier protein (ACP) to shuttle growing molecules along biological assembly lines. Post-translational protein modification is important for adding functions to proteins that can be exploited for therapeutics, protein engineering, affinity design and enzyme immobilization, among other applications. Commercial techniques for attaching labels to acyl carrier protein (ACP) and other carrier proteins are currently in use.

A Humanized Mouse Model of Severe Asthma

UCLA researchers have developed two transgenic mouse models that mimic the allergic response to be used for studying asthma and other allergic and inflammatory diseases.

NH3 Polypeptide Driven Disease Resistance in Plants

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to enhance disease resistance in plants.

Nitrate-Responsive Synthetic Promoter Produces Nitrate-Regulated Gene Expression in Plants

Inorganic nitrogen is a vital nutrient for plants. Soil nitrate provides as much as 90 percent of the nitrogen taken up by most plants and leads to a dramatic change in gene expression, which is critical to direct the productivity and survival of the plant. Consequently, nitrate is commonly provided by way of fertilizer to improve crop yield. However, many crop plants are inefficient in their ability to utilize the nitrogen. For example, corn and wheat typically only utilize 50 percent of the nitrogen applied to the soil and paddy rice may recoup as little as 30 percent. Nitrogen not used by crops may contribute to severe environmental problems, including pollution of ground water, run-off into nearby bodies of water, and release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Plants take up and assimilate nitrate in response to its availability in the soil and the demands of the plant, but with varying efficiency among species. Understanding and improving the ability of particular plant species to respond to and utilize nitrogen could therefore lead to increased crop productivity and decreased water and air pollution.

Haploid Plants through Seeds

Researchers at the University of California Davis have developed a novel method to produce haploid plants through seeds. This method induces genome elimination (from one parent in a cross) with a precise mutation, rather than by culturing haploid cells or by crossing distantly related plants.

DNA Demethylases and uses thereof

  Normal 0 0 1 137 783 UC Berkeley 6 1 961 11.1282 0 0 0 Imprinting regulates a number of genes essential for normal development in mammals and angiosperms. In mammals such imprinted genes contribute to the control of fetal growth and development. Human diseases may also be linked to mutations in imprinted genes or aberrant regulation of their expression.. Differential DNA methylation can be established during oogenesis or spermatogenesis by de novo methyltransferases and maintained somatically by methyltransferases. The conversion of cytosine to 5'-methylcytosine in promoter associated CpG islands has been linked to changes in chromatin structure and often results in transcriptional silencing of the associated gene. Transcriptional silencing by DNA methylation has been linked to mammalian development, imprinting and X-Chromosome inactivation, suppression of parasitic DNA and numerous cancer types. This invention provides for demethylase polypeptides that excise methylated cytosines in DNA.

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