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Novel Genetic Switch for Inducing Gene Expression

Prof. Sean Cutler and colleagues at the University of California, Riverside have engineered a system and methods to induce gene expression in plants and organisms, including mammals, using the chemical compound mandipropamid. Using the PYR/PYL/HAB1 promoter system, the PYR1/HAB1 system is reprogrammed to be activiated with mandipropamid.  When the PYR1/HAB1 system dimerizes through chemical induced dimerization (CID) with mandipropamid, the system functions as a control switch for gene expression. This technology has been demonstrated to advantageously accelerate citrus breeding.  It may be applied to improve CAR T-cell therapy and agricultural crops. Fig 1: UCR’s PYR1/HAB1 system is programmed through chemical induced dimerization (CID) initiated by mandipropamid to function as a switch for agrochemical control of gene expression.  

Magnetochromatic Spheres

Brief description not available

Carbon Nanotube Infrared Detector

Brief description not available

Chromium Complexes Of Graphene

Brief description not available

Magnetometer Based On Spin Wave Interferometer

Brief description not available

Highly Tunable Magnetic Liquid Crystals

Brief description not available

Templated Synthesis Of Metal Nanorods

Brief description not available

Magnetically Responsive Photonic Nanochains

Brief description not available

Stable Photonic Structures

Brief description not available

Synthetic Biology Methods and Systems to Synthesize Strigolactone

Prof. Yanran Li and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a biosynthetic method for producing different strigolactones by designing different biosynthetic pathways in engineered microbial systems. The invention includes engineered E. coli - S. cerevisiae co-culture systems for the biosynthesis of both non-canonical and canonical SLs, including but not limited to carlactone (CL), carlactonic acid (CLA), 5-deoxystrigol(5DS), 4-Deoxyorobanchol (4DO) and orobanchol. This technology allows SLs to be biosynthetically produced in large scale for use in innovative  agrochemicals such as phyto-regulators,  fertilizers, biostimulants that enhance the nutrient uptake efficiency. Fig 1: Mimicking plant strigolactone pathway distribution in the engineered E. coli-S. cerevisiae coculture.

Development of Polygalacturonase Inhibiting Proteins as an Ecological and Non-Toxic Fungal Control Agent

Prof. Yanran Li and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed an eco-friendly fungal control tool using polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIP). In plants, polygalacturonic-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) play critical roles for resistance to fungal disease by inhibiting the pectin depolymerization activity of endo polygalacturonase (PGs), one type of enzyme secreted by pathogens that compromise plant cell walls and leave the plant susceptible to disease. Applying this protein exogenously will inhibit and reduce the fungal spread rate to prevent major economic losses in post harvest crops caused by fungus. Fig 1: Botrytis cinerea treated with either an antifungal known as natamycin (positive control), empty vector yeast (negative control) low copy (LC) or UCR’s high copy (HC) tPvPGIP2_5-8 secreting yeast.

Novel Artificial Vesicle Formulation to Deliver Anti-Fungal Gene Targeting RNAs for Crop Protection

Prof. Hailing Jin and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed novel vesicle formulations to deliver antifungal siRNA as a spray so that crop damage and crop loss is minimized. These vesicle/siRNA formulations are used in Spray-Induced Gene silencing (SIGS) approaches to protect crops and post-harvest plant material from fungal pathogens and other pests. This new formulation is  an eco-friendly, effective, and cost-efficient alternative to traditional pesticides, and offers a way to target specific pathogen genes without the need for generating a GMO crop. Fig 1: External spray application of UCR SIGs (AVs-Bc-DCL1/2-dsRNA) inhibited B. cinerea virulence on tomato fruits, grape berries, lettuce leaves and rose petals compared to the water and control (YFP-dsRNA) (non-specific target sequence) treatments.

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