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Wirelessley Powered Stimulator

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a battery-less implantable pulse generator with concise circuitry and mm-scale form factor.

Software-Automated Medical Imaging Software for Standardizing the Diagnosis of Sarcopenia

Sarcopenia  is defined as an age associated decline in or loss of lean skeletal muscle mass. The pathophysiology can be multifactorial and the change in body composition may be difficult to detect due to obesity, changes in fat mass, or edema. Changes in weight, limb or waist circumference are not reliable indicators of muscle mass changes. Sarcopenia may also cause reduced strength, functional decline and increased risk of falling. Sarcopenia is otherwise asymptomatic and is often unrecognized.  

Titanium Implants with Novel Roughness

UCLA researchers in the School of Dentistry at the Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biology have developed a novel titanium implant with hierarchical multi-scale roughness to promote bone growth.

A Novel Device for the Measurement of the Strength of the Orbicularis Oculi Muscle

UCLA researchers in the Department of Ophthalmology have developed a novel device that measures the strength of the orbicularis oculi muscle.

Method and Apparatus for Movement Therapy Gaming System

Rehabilitation therapy, while an important tool for the long term recovery of patients affected by brain injury or disease, is expensive and requires one-on-one attention from a certified healthcare professional. UCI researchers have developed a computer-based system that provides arm movement therapy for patients. The system allows patients to independently practice hand and arm movements, improving therapeutic outcomes, while reducing hospital visits and cost for both patients and healthcare providers.

Exercise In A Pill: Compounds That Reproduce The Effects Of Exercise On Muscle Metabolism And Growth

UCLA researchers in the Department of Neurology have identified and synthesized small molecule analogs that activate skeletal muscle growth, mediated by calcium calmodulin kinase II signaling.

Antibody-Free Protocol For Generation Of Highly Expandable, Non-Fibroadipogenic Mesodermal Precursors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells For Treatment

UCLA researchers in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery have developed a novel method to generate mesodermal precursors from human pluripotent stem cells to treat chronic skeletal muscle atrophy and fibrosis.

Electrical Charge Balancing Scheme For Functional Stimulation Using Pulse Width Compensation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel electrical charge cancellation scheme to effectively remove residual charge on an electrode, achieving greater precision for lesser hardware cost, while maintaining a surgically implantable small size without extra pulse insertion.

Murine Femoral Critical Defect Model

UCLA researchers in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery have developed an implant system for bone fracture in the mouse femur as a model of intramembranous bone healing.

Small Molecules That Facilitate Exon Skipping

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, and Human Genetics have discovered a novel small molecule therapy that facilitates treatment of Duchene Muscular Dystrophy.

BMP Binding Proteins and Prosthetic Surfaces

UCLA researchers have developed a method to attach and enhance the activity of bone growth factors to prostheses through BMP binding proteins to increase the integration of prostheses and bone.

BBP as a Complexed Carrier for Bone Growth Factors

UCLA researchers have identified a BMP binding peptide that binds to bone growth factors to increase their residence time at the site of implantation for treatment of bone defects.

Three-Step Method For Universal Enrichment, Expansion, And Maturation Of Skeletal Muscle Cells Derived From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

UCLA researchers have developed a novel method for enriching, expanding, and maturing populations of skeletal muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs).

Dextrous Hand Exoskeleton

Researchers led by Professor Jacob Rosen from the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UCLA have developed a novel hand exoskeleton that provides sensory information to the user.

Virtual Reality Training Tasks Used For Stroke Rehabilitation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a set of virtual reality training tasks that can be used for rehabilitation for post-stroke patients.

Polyrotaxane Nanoparticles for Delivery of Large Plasmid DNA in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

UCLA researchers have designed, synthesized, and validated a polyrotaxane nanocarrier for targeted delivery of large plasmids for gene therapy applications for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and cancer.

Joint Tissue Examination and Damage Exam (JADE) Protocol for Quantification of Joint Ultrasound Findings in Hemophilia Arthropathy

Hemophilic arthropathy is a frequent and debilitating comorbidity. Point-of-care musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS) with Power Doppler capacity has become critical during the past several years to evaluate progression of joint disease longitudinally, as well as to detect the presence or absence of joint bleeding associated with joint pains in a timely fashion. With the advent of emerging new treatment modalities the hemophilia population is aging, bringing hemophilic arthropathy rapidly into focus. Based on the increasing need to develop and validate a joint ultrasound imaging protocol that could easily be used in clinical practice as well as a research outcome tool UC San Diego Clinician-Investigators and Collaborators, specialized in Hemophilia, Ultrasound, Musculoskeletal Medicine and Radiology (Drs. Annette von Drygalski, Eric Chang and Randy Moore, as well as Lena Volland, DPT ) developed and validated a unique MSKUS protocol, specifically adept to assess the extent of hemophilic arthropathy in the acute and chronic setting.  This protocol is named JADE protocol (Joint Tissue Assessment and Damage Exam), as described below. The protocol is taught “hands on” during the CME accredited course “Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Hemophilia”, and is also accessible through online modules. https://cme.ucsd.edu/muh/

Methods for Enhancing Cell Populations for Articular Cartilage Repair

Cartilage lesion treatments require expanding cells from healthy donor cartilage which have limited availability and restricted potential to produce cartilage. This invention overcomes these challenges, presenting chemical and physical methods for enhancing cell populations capable of producing neocartilage. According to a 2015 global market report, tissue engineering technologies are expected to reach over 94B USD by 2022.

Methods for Producing Neocartilage with Functional Potential

Cell expansion for cartilage tissue production usually leads to loss of the potential to produce cartilage, which impedes uses for cartilage repair. This invention features methods and systems for producing highly expanded primary cells to construct functional neocartilage and other neotissue. According to a 2015 global market report, tissue engineering technologies are expected to reach over 94B USD by 2022.

An Osteoadsorptive Fluorogenic Substrate of Cathepsin K for Imaging Osteoclast Activity and Migration

UCLA researchers in the Department of Dentistry have developed a novel fluorescent probe for studying the role of osteoclasts in bone diseases and for detecting the early onset of bone resorption by targeting an important protein Cathepsin K. This probe can also deliver drug molecules to bone resorption sites with high specificity.

Half-Virtual-Half-Physical Microactuator

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a half-virtual-half-physical microactuator that utilizes a combination of computational models and microelectromechanical systems for use in medical devices and mechanical systems.

Novel Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal Nanopillared Surface

Medical devices are susceptible to contamination by harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, which form biofilms on device surfaces. These biofilms are often resistant to antibiotics and other current treatments, resulting in over 2 million people per year suffering from diseases related to these contaminating microbes. Death rates for many of these diseases are high, often exceeding 50%. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel anti-bacterial and anti-fungal biocomposite that incorporates a nanopillared surface structure that can be applied as a coating to medical devices.

Rapid Screening and Identification of Antigenic Components in Tissues and Organs

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an approach to rapidly screen and identify antigenic components in tissues and organs.

Sieve Container For Contactless Media Exchange For Cell Growth

Media that contains nutrients and growth factors is necessary to grow all types of cells, a process that is widely used in many fields of research. Such media should be routinely changed either to different media or a fresh batch of the same media. This change currently involves either using a pipette to transfer cells from their current dish of media to a new dish, or aspirating the media out of the dish and replacing it with new media. Both methods have inherent risks to stressing and damaging the cells. Researchers at UCI have developed a unique dish for growing cells that allows for safer aspiration of the old media, which reduces stress and damage to the cells.

Small Molecule Generation of Multinucleated and Striated Myofibers from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Equivalent to Adult Skeletal Muscle

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have developed a novel means of generating adult skeletal muscle-equivalent myofibers from human pluripotent stem cells.

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