Learn more about UC TechAlerts – Subscribe to categories and get notified of new UC technologies

Browse Category: Materials & Chemicals > Polymers

Categories

[Search within category]

Implantable Substance Delivery Devices

This invention describes a method for preparing an implantable device made from biocompatible polymers for sustained delivery of a substance within a body of human or an animal.

Highly-Permeable Polyaniline Membranes with Graphene Oxide Additive and CO2 Separations from Flue Gas

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Civil and Environmental Engineering have developed a method to selectively tune polymer membranes (polyaniline) by incorporating graphene oxide. Additionally, the films produced by this method are capable of separating greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) from air on an industrially relevant scale.

Insulin Infusion Cannulas with Superior Performance

Researchers at UCI have developed the application of a biocompatible material to insulin infusion devices for Type 1 Diabetes to improve device strength, reduce scar tissue buildup, and increase the efficiency of insulin delivery.

A Phase-Changing Polymer Film for Broadband Smart Windows Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed an energy efficient smart window coating with wide light bandwidth and long cycle lifetimes.

Oxime Crosslinked Hydrogels To Prevent Postsurgical Cardiac Adhesions

Although a wide variety of hydrogels have been developed for a multitude of uses, various functional characteristics have been hard to capture in a controllable manner. A significant feature is the ability to ‘tune’ the gel so its gelling time can be controlled in a manner suitable to its application. In this disclosure, because the gel is both tunable and its composition allows it to bond to tissue, the inventors believe it can be used to address an unmet medical need – the formation of adhesions after cardiac surgery. Current methods used are either drug therapy or various physical barriers but their success is limited.

Enhanced Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

Brief description not available

One-Pot Synthesis of Polyol from Algae Oil for Sustainable Polyurethanes

A large sector with potential for improvement is the polyurethane industry, which produces versatile polymers and foams for use in many commercial products. Production of these polymers is dependent on precursor polyols. Current production of industrial polyols is dominated by petroleum-derived polyethers, which is unsustainable and presents environmental hazards due to their poor degradation in the environment.

Photocurable Poly(ethylene glycol) as a Bioink for the Inkjet 3D Pharming of Hydrophobic Drugs

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel inkjet 3D pharming technique that is fast, customizable, and compatible with hydrophobic drugs.

Spray Dry Method for Calcium Cross-linked Alginate Encapsulation of Biological and Chemical Moieties via the Use of Chelating Agents

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a one-step spray dry calcium cross-linked alginate encapsulation process where the calcium is released from a chelating agent.

Antimicrobial and Osteoinductive Hydrogel for Dental Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering developed osteoinductive and antimicrobial hydrogel adhesives for dental applications.

Homogeneous Freestanding Luminescent Perovskite Organogel with Superior Water Stability

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a perovskite-embedded organogel with superior water stability and versatile design and mechanical properties.

System And Method For Producing Polyhydroxyalkanoates From Organic Waste

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an efficient method for producing polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) from organic waste using a halophilic microorganism.

Gelatin Methacryloyl Based Microneedle

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed gelatin methacryloyl microneedles (GelMA MN) for minimally invasive, sustained transdermal drug delivery.

Development Of Organ-Preservation Solution Based On O2 Releasing Particles

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Bioengineering, Radiology, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have developed a novel oxygen-generating material for promoting the viability of cells.

Use Of Non-Ionic Copolypeptide Hydrogels For Cell Suspension And Cell And Molecule Delivery

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Bioengineering, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Neurobiology have developed novel copolypeptide hydrogel formulations for the delivery of cells and molecules to locations throughout the body, including the central nervous system.

Material For Thermal Regulation

Researchers at UCI have developed a lightweight, flexible thermal material that, due to the extent that it is stretched, allows for tunable control of heat flow.

Flexible, Biocompatible Microfluidics-inspired Micro-reference Electrodes for Sensing Applications

Researchers at UCI have created miniaturized, flexible, biocompatible reference electrode with a streamline design capable of being used in a variety of different laboratory and clinical environments.

Microporous membranes for the separation of enantiomers

Current methods used to separate racemic compounds on a large scale have limitations in cost, energy efficiency, and discontinuous processing. UCI researchers have synthesized a membrane made of chiral porous polymers that can separate enantiomers from racemic mixtures through continuous processing.

Pressure Sensitive Fabrics

Piezoelectric sensors have long existed to monitor applied pressures between two objects. In large applications with malleable substrates or where low cost is key, individual piezoelectric sensors are not practical. A variety of applications exist where monitoring the pressure being applied to a soft surface would providing meaningful insights into the system or subject under observation. For instance, in a long-term care setting where patients need to be monitored for pressure ulcers, a bedding material that could sense the pressure points between a person’s body and the mattress could alert care givers that an adjustment in body position is warranted. Likewise, in a sports training application, a pressure sensitive boxing ring canvas could track a boxer’s footwork, or punching power and hand speed if applied to the inside of a punching bag.   Pressure sensitive soft toys could also benefit from feedback that might differ when a child scratches behind their stuffed animal’s ears vs. rubbing its belly.  To achieve discrete sensing in these applications, a low cost bulk sensing system is needed.

Cephalopod-Inspired Adaptive Infrared Camouflage Materials and Systems

This technology is a new class of materials capable of thermal regulation and active camouflage. These cephalopod-inspired materials, configurable to different geometries, can be used in many sectors, ranging from consumer to industrial to military applications.

Metabolite-Responsive Hybrid Biomaterials

Researchers have developed a “smart” biomaterial for drug delivery systems capable of responding to signature cancer metabolite concentrations in tumor environments. This response triggers the release of encapsulated drugs at a specific tumor target.

Trehalose Hydrogels For Stabilization And Delivery Of Proteins

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel trehalose hydrogel to help stabilize proteins for drug delivery.

One Step Process of Forming Complex Coacervation During Spray Drying

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a formation of complex coacervate microparticles by spray drying.

Preparation Of Functionalized Polypeptides, Peptides, And Proteins By Alkylation Of Thioether Groups

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering Department, have developed new methods for adding different functional groups on polypeptides.  The UCLA researchers have used this method to create a platform to create and modify nanoscale vesicles and hydrogels for use in nanoscale drug delivery particles, injectable drug depots, imaging and detection, industrial biomaterials, and wound management.

  • Go to Page: