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Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis

Professor Matthew Conley from the University of California, Riverside has developed heterogeneous ruthenium catalysts for olefin metathesis. These catalysts have higher activity than state-of-the-art homogeneous catalysts in metathesis of terminal olefins.  They are combined with state-of-the-art anion capped materials that anchor positively charged Grubbs catalyst to the surface to form active heterogeneous olefin metathesis catalyst. This technology has the potential to produce heterogeneous catalysts that are less expensive, more efficient, and faster than the available homogenous ruthenium catalysts for olefin metathesis. Fig 1: Chemical structure of UCR’s heterogneous Grubb’s catalyst supported on functionalized silica for olefin metathesis.  

Camellia Sinesis Rapid Growth Platform

Researchers at the University of California Davis have developed a rapid growth platform that aims to decrease crop production time, allow for tunable sensory attributes, and decrease carbon emissions.

High-Throughput Selection Platform to Obtain NMN+-Utilizing Enzymes Through Directed Evolution

Noncanonical redox cofactor-based biotransformation is an attractive low-cost alternative to traditional cell-free reductive biotransformation. However, engineering enzymes to utilize noncanonical redox cofactors has been challenging. Addressing this problem, researchers at UC Irvine have developed a high-throughput directed evolution platform that enables development of such enzymes with ~147-fold improved catalytic efficiency, which translates to an industry-viable total turnover number of ~45,000 in cell-free biotransformation without requiring high cofactor concentrations.

High Yield Co-Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Intermediates to Methylated Furans

Prof. Charles Cai and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a method for high yield co-conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to produce high octane fuel additives dimethyl furan (DMF) and methyl furans (MF). This technology works by using Cu-Ni/TiO2, a unique catalytic material that enables high yield (~90%) conversion of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) and furfural (FF) sourced from lignocellulosic biomass into methylated furans (MF) in either single or co-processing schemes. This invention is advantageous compared to existing technologies due to its high yield and efficiency, low cost, and stable conversion process.   Fig 1: UCR’s furfural conversion and product yields as function of reaction time over Cu-Ni/TiO2.  

Low-Cost Synthesis of High Performance Polyurethanes

Professor Charles Cai from the University of California, Riverside has developed a method to produce a high-performance, renewable polyurethane material made from biomass lignin for use as an adhesive, resin, coating, or plastic. In this method, diols were introduced to realize faster and complete dissolution of technical lignins in volatile organic solvents, which improve lignin miscibility with other components and its dispersion in the PU materials. This technology is advantageous because it improves the economic viability of lignocellulosic biorefinery, can replace petroleum-based polyols in commercial polyurethanes products to reduce carbon footprint, and, as a natural UV-block, lignin reduces the UV aging of PU materials.   Fig 1: The UCR method to produce polyurethane material from biomass lignin.  

Catalysts For Direct Conversion Of Ethylene To Propylene

Profs. Matthew P. Conley and Richard R. Schrock from the University of California, Riverside have developed a new catalyst that may be used to synthesize propylene from ethylene under mild conditions. The key steps involved in the direct conversion of ethylene to propylene are ring-contraction of a metallacyclopentane complex to a metallacyclobutane complex followed by rearrangement of the metallacyclobutane complex to propylene. This technology is advantageous because it consists of a single reaction overall that operates at mild temperatures, because the catalyst efficiency can be engineered to optimize turnover frequency and yield, and because propylene is the only product of the reaction.   Fig 1: The UCR catalytic cycle for ethylene to propylene  

Magnetochromatic Spheres

Brief description not available

Chromium Complexes Of Graphene

Brief description not available

Templated Synthesis Of Metal Nanorods

Brief description not available

Magnetically Responsive Photonic Nanochains

Brief description not available

Carbon Dioxide Flow Battery

Inventors at UCI have developed a novel electrocatalyst that reversibly converts carbon dioxide to its reduced form for the power source of a flow battery. The incorporation of this novel electocatalyst allows a common chemical, such as carbon dioxide to be included in the flow battery providing more affordable alternative than what is currently used. Furthermore, this technology has increased solubility, improving the energy density of the battery.

Direct Synthesis of Light Olefins from Carbon Dioxide using Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Support

The production of light olefins (ethylene, propylene and butylene) via the activation of carbon dioxide as a feedstock is a challenging reaction that requires intermediate steps and often suffers from low yields. The researchers at the University of California, Irvine, discovered a novel bifunctional catalyst comprising of Zirconium and Indium combined with a zeolite matrix to promote the production of light olefins in higher efficiency and yields.

A New Doping Strategy for Layered Oxide Electrode Materials Used in Lithium-Ion Batteries

Researchers at UCI have invented a novel method that significantly improves the design and efficiency of lithium ion batteries. The invention is based on a “high entropy” or “cocktail” doping strategy, which improves the electrochemical performance of cathode materials through increasing energy density and cycle life and reducing reliance on expensive and toxic materials such as Cobalt.

Spray Coated Paint Based on Glass Bubbles for Buildings

Developing optical materials with a high solar reflectivity and high mid-infrared emissivity is important for coating the outdoor buildings. The authors proposed a spray coated paint based on glass bubbles which can be used to maintain the thermal environment of constructions.

Stable N-acetylated analogs of Sialic Acids and Sialosides

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have constructed a library of glycans containing N-acetyl sialic acids to mimic those containing naturally occurring O-acetyl sialic acids.

2-D Polymer-Based Device for Serial X-Ray Crystallography

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a single-use chip for the identification of protein crystals using X-ray based instruments.

One-Pot Multienzyme Synthesis of Sialidase Reagents, Probes and Inhibitors

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have developed an environmentally friendly one-pot multienzyme (OPME) method for synthesizing sialidase reagents, probes, and inhibitors.

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