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Thz Radiation Detector Using Bilayers Of Antiferromagnet And Heavy Metal Films

Background A practical implementation that can generate and detect electromagnetic radiation in the range 0.1 to 10 Terahertz is important in the advancement of biomedicine, security systems, ultrafast 5G & 6G communication, etc. Technology Prof. Jing Shi and his research team have developed a novel, compact and scalable semiconductor integrated circuit technology (IC) for Terahertz (THz) detection. The innovation is a thin film device that is an Anti-Ferro Magnetic (AFM) and Heavy Metal (HM) bilayer - thin film structure that offers broad frequency tunability and scalability. Benefits Broader and tunable frequency responses beyond 1THzCompact & ScalableEase of implementation in semiconductor IC technologyCost effective   Principle: resonant absorption of THz radiation drives spins in anti-ferromagnet (AFM) into precession, which is detected by heavy metal (HM) as a DC voltage.

(SD2018-032) Intrinsically Linear Transistor for Millimeter-Wave Low Noise Amplifiers

There has been a steady rise in interest in utilizing Fin high-electron mobility transistors HEMT devices to reduce the source access resistance and enhance the linearity but this linearity is not accessible at gate voltages beyond those at which the gate Schottky diode turns on (~2 V). All known transistor technologies are intrinsically non-linear. This non-linearity leads to signal distortion and power loss. Non-linearity is embodied in a decrease of the transistor current gain cut-off frequency, fT, and maximum oscillation frequency, fmax, with an increase in the drain current.  In contrast, the patented technology here is one of a new Fin MOS-HEMT device permits flexible engineering of the device threshold voltage in order to attain linearity over a wider VGS range (voltage between transistor gate and source (VGS) in excess of the threshold voltage (Vt) where Vt is defined as the minimum).

(SD2021-225) Wireless Contact Force Sensing and Localization

Our sense of touch is critical for understanding and interacting with the world around us. While interacting with the physical world, force-sensitive mechanoreceptors in the skin respond to various vibrations, motions, pressures, and stretching of the skin to provide us with critical information on the location and magnitude of the stimuli. Thus, if we want the next generation of tactile sensors to emulate how our skin reacts to stimuli, we need to both sense the magnitude and location of contact forces acting on the sensing surface.Contact force is a natural way for humans to interact with the physical world around us. However, most of our interactions with the digital world are largely based on a simple binary sense of touch (contact or no contact). Similarly, when interacting with robots to perform complex tasks, such as surgery, we need to acquire the rich force information and contact location, to aid in the task.

Compressive High-Speed Optical Transceiver

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an optical transceiver that uses compressive sensing to reduce bandwidth requirements and improve signal resolution.

Adapting Existing Computer Networks to a Quantum-Based Internet Future

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an approach for integrating quantum computers into the existing internet backbone.

(SD2019-307) Autonomous Millimeter Accurate Mapping of WiFi Infrastructure AND Reverse Localization of COTS WiFi Access Points

Indoor localization has been studied for nearly two decades fueled by wide interest in indoor navigation, achieving the necessary decimeter-level accuracy. However, there are no real-world deployments of WiFi-based user localization algorithms, primarily because these algorithms are infrastructure dependent and therefore assume the location of the Access Points, their antenna geometries, and deployment orientations in the physical map. In the real world, such detailed knowledge of the location attributes of the access point is seldom available, thereby making WiFi localization hard to deploy.   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Location services, fundamentally, rely on two components: a mapping system and a positioning system. The mapping system provides context, and the positioning system identifies the position within the map. Outdoor location services have thrived over the last couple of decades because of wellestablished platforms for both these components (e.g. Google Maps for mapping, and GPS for positioning). In contrast, indoor location services haven’t caught up because of the lack of reliable mapping and positioning frameworks (and lack of integration between the two). SLAM methods construct maps that aren’t tagged with locations. Wi-Fi positioning lacks maps, and is also prone to environmental errors. In contrast, indoor navigation even with significant interest from industry and academia lacks further behind.  We cannot use our smartphone to navigate to a conference room in a new building or to find a product of interest in a shopping mall. The primary reason for the poor indoor navigation system is the unavailability of indoor localization augmented maps and floor plans. On one hand, Google and a few other providers make indoor floor plans for airports, malls, and famous buildings, those floor-plans have to be created manually and often need to updated as floor plans change and they lack details such as the position of furniture and other obstacles. On the other hand, besides mapping, ability to position users’ location on these indoor maps is necessary for indoor navigation  

High-Frequency Imaging and Data Transmission Using a Re-configurable Array Source with Directive Beam Steering

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a reconfigurable radiator array that produces a high frequency directed beam via uninterrupted, scalable, electronic beam steering.

(SD2020-464) Enabling Reliable Mmwave Link Using Multi-Beam Pro-Active Tracking

Millimeter-wave communication with high throughput and high reliability is poised to be a gamechanger for V2X and VR applications. However, mmWave links are notorious for low reliability since they suffer from frequent outages due to blockage and user mobility. Traditional mmWave systems are hardly reliable for two reasons. First, they create a highly directional link that acts as a single point of failure and cannot be sustained for high user mobility. Second, they follow a `reactive' approach, which reacts after the link has already suffered an outage. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Phased-Locked Loop Coupled Array for Phased Array Applications

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a phased-locked loop coupled array system capable of generating phase shifts in phased array antenna systems - while minimizing signal losses.

Systems and Methods for Sound-Enhanced Meeting Platforms

Computer-based, internet-connected, audio/video meeting platforms have become pervasive worldwide, especially since the 2020 emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. These meeting platforms include Cisco Webex, Google Meet, GoTo, Microsoft Teams, and Zoom. However, those popular platforms are optimized for meetings in which all the participants are attending the meeting online, individually. Accordingly, those platforms have shortcomings when used for hybrid meetings in which some participants are attending together in-person and others attending online. Also, the existing platforms are problematic for large meetings in big rooms (e.g. classrooms) in which most or all of the participants are in-person. To address those suboptimal meet platform situations, researchers at UC Berkeley conceived systems, methods, algorithms and other software for a meeting platform that's optimized for hybrid meetings and large in-person meetings. The Berkeley meeting platform offers a user experience that's familiar to users of the conventional meeting platforms. Also, the Berkeley platform doesn't require any specialized participant hardware or specialized physical room infrastructure (beyond standard internet connectivity).

Carbon Nanotube based Variable Frequency Patch-Antenna

Researchers at UCI have developed a patch antenna constructed from carbon nanotubes, whose transmission frequency can be tuned entirely electronically. Additionally, the antenna can be made operable in the microwave to visible frequency regime by simply varying the device dimensions and composition.

Multi-Agent Navigation And Communication Systems

The field of autonomous transportation is rapidly evolving to operate in diverse settings and conditions. However, as the number of autonomous vehicles on the road increases the complexity of the computations needed to safely operate all of the autonomous vehicles grows rapidly. across multiple vehicles, this creates a very large volume of computations that must be performed very quickly (e.g., in real or near-real time).   Thus, treating each autonomous vehicle as an independent entity may result in inefficient use of computing resources, as many redundant data collections and computations may be performed (e.g., two vehicles in close proximity may be performing computations related to the same detected object). To address this issue, researches at UC Berkeley proposed algorithms for the management and exchange of shared information across nearby and distant vehicles.According to the proposed arrangement, autonomous vehicles may share data collected by their respective sensor systems with other autonomous vehicles and adjust their operations accordingly in a manner that is more computationally efficient. This can not only increase safety but at the same time reduce computational load required by each individual vehicle.

Temporal And Spectral Dynamic Sonar System For Autonomous Vehicles

The field of autonomous transportation is rapidly evolving to operate in diverse settings and conditions.  Critical to the performance of autonomous vehicles is the ability to detect other objects in the autonomous vehicle’s vicinity and adjust accordingly. To do so, many autonomous vehicles utilize a variety of sensors, including sonar. Although these sensor systems have been shown to improve the safety of autonomous vehicles by reducing collisions, the sensor systems tend to be computationally inefficient.  For instance, the sensor systems may generate large volumes of data that must be processed quickly (e.g., in real or near-real time).  The performance of excessive computations may delay the identification and deployment of necessary resources and actions and/or increase the cost of hardware on the vehicle making it less financially appealing to the consumer. Researches at UC Berkeley proposed algorithms for temporally and spectrally adaptive sonar systems for autonomous vehicles. These allow utilization of existing sonar system in an adaptive manner and in interface with existence hardware/software employed on autonomous vehicles. 

Embedded Power Amplifier

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an amplifier technology that boosts power output in order to improve data transmission speeds for high-frequency communications.

Absorptive Microwave Bandpass Filters

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed absorptive bandpass filters that enable improved passband flatness and good impedance matching both in-band and out-of-band.

Guided-Wave Powered Wireless Sensors

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a wirelessly powered, flexible sensor that detects pipe leaks over long distances.

A Battery-Less Wirelessly Powered Frequency-Swept Spectroscopy Sensor

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a wirelessly powered frequency-swept spectroscopy sensor.

(SD2020-422) ScatterMIMO: Enabling Virtual MIMO with Smart Surfaces. ScatterMIMO is a programmable smart surface that contains phase shifters to change the wireless channel

In the last decade, the bandwidth expansion and MIMO spatial multiplexing have promised to increase data throughput by orders of magnitude. However, we are yet to enjoy such improvement in real-world environments, as they lack rich scattering and preclude effective MIMO spatial multiplexing.

BLoc: CSI-Based Accurate Localization for BLE Tags

Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) tags have become very prevalent over the last decade for tracking applications in homes as well as businesses. These tags are used to track objects, navigate people, and deliver contextual advertisements. However, in spite of the wide interest in tracking BLE tags, the primary methods of tracking them are based on signal strength (RSSI) measurements. Past work has shown that such methods are inaccurate, and prone to multipath and dynamic environments. As a result, localization using Wi-Fi has moved to Channel State Information (CSI, includes both signal strength and signal phase) based localization methods. In indoor environments, BLE tags are the methods of choice. They provide sufficiently long range indoors, are resistant to frequency selective fading and have low power operation. BLE tags are readable by off-the-shelf smartphones and access points, because of their co-existence in the 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi band. BLE tags are, therefore, getting very popular for tracking operations in homes, factory floors, etc. Google’s vision for physical web is based on extensive deployment of BLE beacons. It is in this context that localization for BLE devices becomes crucial. Deep Neural Networks and Convolutional Neural Network techniques to overcome these limitations.

THz Impulse and Frequency Comb Generation Using Reverse Recovery of PIN Diode

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed an antenna design procedure that can realize devices with beam scanning at a fixed frequency on a single element antenna.

Nonreciprocal Reflectarray Antennas based on time-modulation

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed nonreciprocal and reconfigurable reflectarray antennas based on time-modulation with demonstrated advantages over the state of the art.

Nonreciprocal And Reconfigurable Phased-Array Antennas

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed nonreciprocal and reconfigurable phased-array antennas with demonstrated advantages over competing, current technologies.

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