Learn more about UC TechAlerts – Subscribe to categories and get notified of new UC technologies

Browse Category: Communications > Internet

Categories

[Search within category]

Low Complexity Maximum-Likelihood Decoding of Cyclic Codes

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a low complexity decoding algorithm of cyclic codes with better performance and lower latency than current approaches.

A Method For Discovering And Downloading Hidden Web Content

Researchers in the Computer Science Department at UCLA have developed a method for searching hidden web content that has previously been difficult to gather for the end user.

Privacy Preserving Stream Analytics

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computer Science have developed a new privacy preserving mechanism for stream analytics.

Frequency Translating Backscatter Modulator With Envelope Control To Support OFDM/QAM And Other Envelope Modulated Wireless Protocols

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a new modulator that provides both phase and frequency control.

A New Signal Analysis Method For Angle Of Arrival Estimation, Tracking, Localization, And Head Counting With Rf Signals

A new framework that enables the estimation of the AoA of signal paths from signal sources (both active transmitters and passive objects), with only signal magnitude measurements.

Security Key Generation Technique for Inter-Vehicular Visible Light Communication

The invention is a technique that provides a novel, reliable and secure cryptography solution for inter-vehicular visible light communication. Through combining unique data as the road roughness and the driving behavior, a symmetric security key is generated for both communicating vehicles. As the data used is unique to the communicating vehicles only, the generated keys are thus unique, securing a reliable communication channel between both vehicles.

Unsupervised WiFi-Enabled Device-User Association for Personalized Location-Based Services

With the emergence of the Internet of Things in smart homes and buildings, determining the identity and mobility of people are key to realizing personalized, context-aware and location-based services - such as adjusting lights and temperature as well as setting preferences of electronic devices in the vicinity. Conventional electronic user identification approaches either require proactive cooperation by users or deployment of dedicated infrastructure. Consequently, existing approaches are intrusive, inconvenient, or expensive to ubiquitously implement. For example: biometric identification requires specific hardware and physical interaction; and vision-based (video) approaches need favorable lighting and introduce privacy issues. To address this situation, researchers at UC Berkeley developed an identification system that uses existing, pervasive WiFi infrastructure and users' WiFi-enabled devices. The innovative Berkeley technology cleverly leverages attributes such as the MAC address and RSS of users' WiFi-enabled devices. Furthermore, the Berkeley approach is facilitated by an unsupervised learning scheme that maps each user identification with associated WiFi-enabled devices. This technology could serve as a vital underpinning for practical personalized context-aware and location-based services in the era of the Internet of Things.

Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Communication System Using Reconfigurable Antennas

Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) communication systems, which increase communication speed and signal quality using multi-path propagation, have become an essential part of modern wireless communication such as Wi-Fi and 4G mobile internet connectivity. UCI inventors have developed a wireless communication system architecture that, by using reconfigurable antennas, improves the data throughput capacity and lowers implementation cost and complexity for MIMO communication systems.

A Technique For Securing Key-Value Stores Against Malicious Servers

The advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) has drastically increased the potential scale and scope of destruction hackers can cause. Cloud servers now control and monitor devices such as cars, smart home controls, fitness trackers, medical monitoring systems. These cloud-based devices are at risk, however, in that if they become compromised, third parties could gain full control of all devices and stored information associated with that server. UCI researchers have developed the FIDELIUS system, a technique for secure communication and information storage.

Respiratory Monitor For Asthma And Other Pulmonary Conditions

A patch sensor that is able to continuously monitor breathing rate and volume to diagnose pulmonary function and possibly predict and possibly prevent fatal asthma attacks.

Monitor Alarm Fatigue Allevation By SuperAlarms - Predictive Combination Of Alarms

UCLA researchers in the Department of Neurosurgery have developed a method that is capable of mining a collection of monitor alarms to search for specific combinations of encoded monitor alarms to predict certain adverse event, such as in-hospital code blue arrests or other target events.

Current to Voltage Converter for High-Speed Optical Fiber Communications

The exponential increase in internet traffic due to the increased availability of internet access as well as high demand activities (such as movie streaming) presents an enormous challenge to infrastructure in handling this increasing amount of data. The UCI researchers have developed an ultra-broadband transimpedance amplifier (TIA), which is a key component for coupling high-speed optical fiber to conventional metal wiring. The silicon-based circuit is capable of 50 Gbps data transfer, representing a 25% increase over other, state of the art devices.

Cloud-Based Pulmonary Spirometry System

Inventors at UC Irvine developed a portable spirometry system that automatically uploads patient pulmonary data to the Internet, and provides a cloud-based platform to analyze and share the data with an attending healthcare professional.

Mechanical Process For Creating Particles Using Two Plates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Physics and Astronomy have developed a novel method to lithograph two polished solid surfaces by using a simple mechanical alignment jig with piezoelectric control and a method of pressing them together and solidifying a material.

A Hundred Tiny Hands

100 Tiny Hands is an experiential learning program that imparts science, technology, engineering, and math (“STEM”) education to children ages six to twelve using storybook-inspired curriculum coupled with interactive educational “toolboxes.”

Metal-free affinity media/agents for the selective capture of histidine-rich peptide sequences

The present invention utilizes metal-free synthetic polymer-based materials for the purification of peptides and proteins containing or being fused with histidine-rich sequences, which does not damage the function of the target protein and is less costly.

Hemispherical Rectenna Arrays for Multi-Directional, Multi-Polarization, and Multi-Band Ambient RF Energy Harvesting

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a system that can receive RF waves in different frequency bands, from different directions, and with different polarizations to maximize energy harvested from ambient radio-frequency signals.

External Cavity Laser Based Upon Metasurfaces

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel approach for terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade (QC) lasers to achieve scalable output power, high quality diffraction limited, and directive output beams.

Cross-Layer Robust Header Compression (ROHC) Compressor Design

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a ROHC compressor that adaptively adjusts the compression level based on an underlying Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP) model.

RF-Powered Micromechanical Clock Generator

Realizing the potential of massive sensor networks requires overcoming cost and power challenges. When sleep/wake strategies can adequately limit a network node's sensor and wireless power consumption, then the power limitation comes down to the real-time clock (RTC) that synchronizes sleep/wake cycles. With typical RTC battery consumption on the order of 1µW, a low-cost printed battery with perhaps 1J of energy would last about 11 days. However, if a clock could bleed only 10nW from this battery, then it would last 3 years. To attain such a clock, researchers at UC Berkeley developed a mechanical circuit that harnesses squegging to convert received RF energy (at -58dBm) into a local clock while consuming less than 17.5nW of local battery power. The Berkeley design dispenses with the conventional closed-loop positive feedback approach to realize an RCT (along with its associated power consumption) and removes the need for a sustaining amplifier altogether. 

Signal Statistics Compression-Based Quantization Method in an ADC

The technology is a new architecture for analog-to-digital converters (ADCs).Its properties include the use of unique signal statistics compression quantization technique, lower power than other ADC techniques, no degradation of effective number of bits and conversion rate, and automatic adaption to power-optimized state of input signal.With this technology, users will be able to produce more power efficient ADCs

Zero-Quiescent Power Transceiver

Trillions of sensors are envisioned to achieve the potential benefits of the internet of things.  Realizing this potential requires wireless sensors with low power requirements such that there might never be a need to replace a sensor’s power supply (e.g. battery) over the lifetime of that device.  The battery lifetime of wireless communications devices is often governed by power consumption used for transmitting, and therefore transmit power amplifiers used in these devises are important to their commercial success.  The efficiencies of these power amplifiers are set by the capabilities of the semiconductor transistor devices that drive them.  To achieve improved efficiencies, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a novel method and structure for realizing a zero-quiescent power trigger sensor and transceiver based on a micromechanical resonant switch.  This sensor/transceiver is unique in its use of a resonant switch (“resoswitch”) to receive an input, amplify it, and finally deliver power to a load.  This novel technology also greatly improves short-range communication applications, like Bluetooth.  For example, with this technology, interference between Bluetooth devices would be eliminated.  Also, Miracast would work, despite the presence of interfering Bluetooth signals.

  • Go to Page: