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Adapting Existing Computer Networks to a Quantum-Based Internet Future

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an approach for integrating quantum computers into the existing internet backbone.

Phased-Locked Loop Coupled Array for Phased Array Applications

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a phased-locked loop coupled array system capable of generating phase shifts in phased array antenna systems - while minimizing signal losses.

(SD2019-340) Collaborative High-Dimensional Computing

Internet of Things ( IoT ) applications often analyze collected data using machine learning algorithms. As the amount of the data keeps increasing, many applications send the data to powerful systems, e.g., data centers, to run the learning algorithms . On the one hand, sending the original data is not desirable due to privacy and security concerns.On the other hand, many machine learning models may require unencrypted ( plaintext ) data, e.g., original images , to train models and perform inference . When offloading theses computation tasks, sensitive information may be exposed to the untrustworthy cloud system which is susceptible to internal and external attacks . In many IoT systems , the learning procedure should be performed with the data that is held by a large number of user devices at the edge of Internet . These users may be unwilling to share the original data with the cloud and other users if security concerns cannot be addressed.

Systems and Methods for Sound-Enhanced Meeting Platforms

Computer-based, internet-connected, audio/video meeting platforms have become pervasive worldwide, especially since the 2020 emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. These meeting platforms include Cisco Webex, Google Meet, GoTo, Microsoft Teams, and Zoom. However, those popular platforms are optimized for meetings in which all the participants are attending the meeting online, individually. Accordingly, those platforms have shortcomings when used for hybrid meetings in which some participants are attending together in-person and others attending online. Also, the existing platforms are problematic for large meetings in big rooms (e.g. classrooms) in which most or all of the participants are in-person. To address those suboptimal meet platform situations, researchers at UC Berkeley conceived systems, methods, algorithms and other software for a meeting platform that's optimized for hybrid meetings and large in-person meetings. The Berkeley meeting platform offers a user experience that's familiar to users of the conventional meeting platforms. Also, the Berkeley platform doesn't require any specialized participant hardware or specialized physical room infrastructure (beyond standard internet connectivity).

Contextual Augmentation Using Scene Graphs

Spatial computing experiences are constrained by the real-world surroundings of the user.  In such experiences, augmenting virtual objects to existing scenes require a contextual approach, where geometrical conflicts are avoided, and functional and plausible relationships to other objects are maintained in the target environment.  Yet, due to the complexity and diversity of user environments, automatically calculating ideal positions of virtual content that is adaptive to the context of the scene is considered a challenging task.    UC researchers have developed a framework which augments scenes with virtual objects using an explicit generative model to learn topological relationship from priors extracted from a real-world and/or synthetic 3D datasets.  Primarily designed for spatial computing applications, SceneGen extracts features from rooms into a novel spatial representation which encapsulates positional and orientational relationships of a scene which captures pairwise topology between objects, object groups, and the room.  The AR application iteratively augments objects by sampling positions and orientations across a room to create a probabilistic heat map of where the object can be placed.  By placing objects in poses where the spatial relationships are likely, we are able to augment scenes that are realistic. 

Automatic Fine-Grained Radio Map Construction and Adaptation

The real-time position and mobility of a user is key to providing personalized location-based services (LBSs) – such as navigation. With the pervasiveness of GPS-enabled mobile devices (MDs), LBSs in outdoor environments is common and effective. However, providing equivalent quality of LBSs using GPS in indoor environments can be problematic. The ubiquity of both WiFi in indoor environments and WiFi-enabled MDs, makes WiFi a promising alternative to GPS for indoor LBSs. The most promising approach to establishing a WiFi-based indoor positioning system requires the construction of a high quality radio map for an indoor environment. However, the conventional approach for making the radio map is labor intensive, time-consuming, and vulnerable to temporal and environmental dynamics. To address this situation, researchers at UC Berkeley developed an approach for automatic, fine-grained radio map construction and adaptation. The Berkeley technology works both (a) in free space – where people and robots can move freely (e.g. corridors and open office space); and (b) in constrained space – which is blocked or not readily accessible. In addition to its use with WiFi signals, this technology could also be used with other RF signals – for example, in densely populated and built-up urban areas where it can be suboptimal to only rely on GPS.

Privacy Preserving Stream Analytics

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computer Science have developed a new privacy preserving mechanism for stream analytics.

Private Keyword Search on Streaming Data

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computer Science have developed a novel way in which to secretly search for and collect relevant information from a streaming database. The invention has application to intelligence gathering and data mining.

Security Key Generation Technique for Inter-Vehicular Visible Light Communication

The invention is a technique that provides a novel, reliable and secure cryptography solution for inter-vehicular visible light communication. Through combining unique data as the road roughness and the driving behavior, a symmetric security key is generated for both communicating vehicles. As the data used is unique to the communicating vehicles only, the generated keys are thus unique, securing a reliable communication channel between both vehicles.

Unsupervised WiFi-Enabled Device-User Association for Personalized Location-Based Services

With the emergence of the Internet of Things in smart homes and buildings, determining the identity and mobility of people are key to realizing personalized, context-aware and location-based services - such as adjusting lights and temperature as well as setting preferences of electronic devices in the vicinity. Conventional electronic user identification approaches either require proactive cooperation by users or deployment of dedicated infrastructure. Consequently, existing approaches are intrusive, inconvenient, or expensive to ubiquitously implement. For example: biometric identification requires specific hardware and physical interaction; and vision-based (video) approaches need favorable lighting and introduce privacy issues. To address this situation, researchers at UC Berkeley developed an identification system that uses existing, pervasive WiFi infrastructure and users' WiFi-enabled devices. The innovative Berkeley technology cleverly leverages attributes such as the MAC address and RSS of users' WiFi-enabled devices. Furthermore, the Berkeley approach is facilitated by an unsupervised learning scheme that maps each user identification with associated WiFi-enabled devices. This technology could serve as a vital underpinning for practical personalized context-aware and location-based services in the era of the Internet of Things.

Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Communication System Using Reconfigurable Antennas

Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) communication systems, which increase communication speed and signal quality using multi-path propagation, have become an essential part of modern wireless communication such as Wi-Fi and 4G mobile internet connectivity. UCI inventors have developed a wireless communication system architecture that, by using reconfigurable antennas, improves the data throughput capacity and lowers implementation cost and complexity for MIMO communication systems.

A Technique For Securing Key-Value Stores Against Malicious Servers

The advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) has drastically increased the potential scale and scope of destruction hackers can cause. Cloud servers now control and monitor devices such as cars, smart home controls, fitness trackers, medical monitoring systems. These cloud-based devices are at risk, however, in that if they become compromised, third parties could gain full control of all devices and stored information associated with that server. UCI researchers have developed the FIDELIUS system, a technique for secure communication and information storage.

Respiratory Monitor For Asthma And Other Pulmonary Conditions

A patch sensor that is able to continuously monitor breathing rate and volume to diagnose pulmonary function and possibly predict and possibly prevent fatal asthma attacks.

Monitor Alarm Fatigue Allevation By SuperAlarms - Predictive Combination Of Alarms

UCLA researchers in the Department of Neurosurgery have developed a method that is capable of mining a collection of monitor alarms to search for specific combinations of encoded monitor alarms to predict certain adverse event, such as in-hospital code blue arrests or other target events.

Current to Voltage Converter for High-Speed Optical Fiber Communications

The exponential increase in internet traffic due to the increased availability of internet access as well as high demand activities (such as movie streaming) presents an enormous challenge to infrastructure in handling this increasing amount of data. The UCI researchers have developed an ultra-broadband transimpedance amplifier (TIA), which is a key component for coupling high-speed optical fiber to conventional metal wiring. The silicon-based circuit is capable of 50 Gbps data transfer, representing a 25% increase over other, state of the art devices.

Cloud-Based Pulmonary Spirometry System

Inventors at UC Irvine developed a portable spirometry system that automatically uploads patient pulmonary data to the Internet, and provides a cloud-based platform to analyze and share the data with an attending healthcare professional.

Mechanical Process For Creating Particles Using Two Plates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Physics and Astronomy have developed a novel method to lithograph two polished solid surfaces by using a simple mechanical alignment jig with piezoelectric control and a method of pressing them together and solidifying a material.

A Hundred Tiny Hands

100 Tiny Hands is an experiential learning program that imparts science, technology, engineering, and math (“STEM”) education to children ages six to twelve using storybook-inspired curriculum coupled with interactive educational “toolboxes.”

Visualizing and Data Mining Large-Scale Data Using Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

The emergence of huge, online digital repositories of data (AKA "big data") has made data mining challenging, especially for researchers, scientists, and businesses. These growing massive pools of online data have made it difficult to find relevant information, "connect the dots", and gain "big picture" perspective. For example, in the area of intellectual property, the access to global patent and trademark information includes billions of documents. To date, visualization of large-scale data sets is typically limited to two-dimensional tables, diagrams, and images. Many find these existing tools inadequate.To address this problem, researchers at UC Berkeley developed systems and methods for visualizing large amounts of data in three-dimensional virtual reality and augmented reality spaces. The initial application for this Berkeley technology has been patent documents. However, it's also applicable to visualize non-patent data, including technical and commercial data, etc.

Hemispherical Rectenna Arrays for Multi-Directional, Multi-Polarization, and Multi-Band Ambient RF Energy Harvesting

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a system that can receive RF waves in different frequency bands, from different directions, and with different polarizations to maximize energy harvested from ambient radio-frequency signals.

External Cavity Laser Based Upon Metasurfaces

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel approach for terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade (QC) lasers to achieve scalable output power, high quality diffraction limited, and directive output beams.

Cross-Layer Robust Header Compression (ROHC) Compressor Design

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a ROHC compressor that adaptively adjusts the compression level based on an underlying Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP) model.

RF-Powered Micromechanical Clock Generator

Realizing the potential of massive sensor networks requires overcoming cost and power challenges. When sleep/wake strategies can adequately limit a network node's sensor and wireless power consumption, then the power limitation comes down to the real-time clock (RTC) that synchronizes sleep/wake cycles. With typical RTC battery consumption on the order of 1µW, a low-cost printed battery with perhaps 1J of energy would last about 11 days. However, if a clock could bleed only 10nW from this battery, then it would last 3 years. To attain such a clock, researchers at UC Berkeley developed a mechanical circuit that harnesses squegging to convert received RF energy (at -58dBm) into a local clock while consuming less than 17.5nW of local battery power. The Berkeley design dispenses with the conventional closed-loop positive feedback approach to realize an RCT (along with its associated power consumption) and removes the need for a sustaining amplifier altogether. 

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