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Browse Category: Sensors & Instrumentation > Biosensors

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Nano Biosensing System

Metabolites can provide real-time information about the state of a person’s health. Devices that can detect metabolites are commercially available, but are unable to detect very low concentrations of metabolites. Researchers at UCI have developed surfaces that use nanosensors to detect much lower concentrations of such metabolites.

Membrane Insertion of Potential Sensing Nanorods

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry have developed inorganic semiconductor nanosensors that measure membrane voltage.

Wearable Real-Time Gait Analysis And Sensory Feedback System For Gait Rehabilitation And Biomechanical Optimization

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a wearable sensory feedback system that provides instructive tactile feedback to guide the user towards biomechanical gait improvements, based on real-time motion analysis derived from wearable sensor data.

A Simple Integrated Device For Assessing Lung Health

Chronic lung diseases, like asthma, impose critical challenges on both the patients and the physicians due to the complexity of the diseases. Not only are these diseases tough to accurately assess, many of the diseases can be impacted by other physical and sociological factors. Perhaps a greater difficulty lies in measuring the effectiveness and compliance of the medications including inhaled medications. The invention discovered at the University of California, Irvine, is an “all-in-one,” portable device that offers complete assessment of lung health. It also incorporates a novel technology for monitoring the effectiveness and compliance of a medication, thereby, providing a personalized treatment and care plan for adults and children with asthma.

Upconversion Plasmonic Mapping: A Direct Plasmonic Visualization And Spectrometer-Free Sensing Method

Researchers led by Xiangfeng Duan from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA have developed a cheap and efficient way to map surface plasmon polaritons in order to detect trace amounts of biomolecules.

Graphene Nanomesh As A Glucose Sensor

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry and of Materials Science & Engineering have developed a glucose sensor based on a graphene nanomesh (GNM) material. The nanoscale GNM glucose sensor provides the potential for in vivo glucose sensing with high selectivity and high sensitivity.

Highly Sensitive, Conformal And Wearable In2O3 Nanoribbon Transistor Biosensors With Integrated On Chip Side Gate For Glucose Monitoring In Body Fluid

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel wearable sensor that is capable of measuring glucose levels in bodily fluids.

Ultra-Dense Electrode-Based Brain Imaging System With High Spatial And Temporal Resolution

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel integrated brain imaging system that utilizes an ultra-dense electrode-based device. This system provides high resolution of functional brain images spatially and temporally.

Air Quality Monitoring Using Mobile Microscopy And Machine Learning

UCLA researchers have developed a novel method to monitor air quality using mobile microscopy and machine learning.

Lensfree Tomographic Imaging

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a system for lens-free tomographic imaging.

Expandable Vascular Sheath

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiology have developed a novel expandable vascular sheath that can be used for encasement and facilitated extraction of foreign objects that have a larger cross section than existing vascular sheaths.

Oral Microsensor Arrays for Remote Monitoring of Salivary Electrolytes for Precision Healthcare

UCLA researchers in the Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery have developed a novel microsensor system for unobtrusive monitoring of oral pH and electrolytes levels. This system is integrated into a data analysis and feedback network for disease prevention and precision care.

Near-Realistic Sports Motion Analysis and Activity Monitoring

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computer Science have developed a new technology to fight the growing obesity epidemic by encouraging exercise in video games.

Colorimetric Sensing Of Amines

An affordable and easily synthesized indicator that can be applied to monitor reaction progress in a system using only one inexpensive and non-toxic agent.

Apparatus and Signal Processing Technique for Real-Time Label-Free High-Throughput Cell Screening

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have invented a novel apparatus for real-time label-free high-throughput cell screening.

Plasmonic Nanoparticle Embedded PDMS Micropillar Array and Fabrication Approaches for Large Area Cell Force Sensing

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel cell force sensor platform with high accuracy over large areas.

Electrical Conduction In A Cephalopod Structural Protein

Fabricating materials from naturally occurring proteins that are inherently biocompatible enables the resulting material to be easily integrated with many downstream applications, ranging from batteries to transistors. In addition, protein-based materials are also advantageous because they can be physically tuned and specifically functionalized. Inventors have developed protein-based material from structural proteins such as reflectins found in cephalopods, a molluscan class that includes cuttlefish, squid, and octopus. In a space dominated by artificial, man-made proton-conducting materials, this material is derived from naturally occurring proteins.

Single-Pixel Optical Technologies For Instantly Quantifying Multicellular Response Profiles

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and the Department of Pathology & Lab Medicine have proposed a new platform technology to actuate and sense force propagation in real-time for large sheets of cells.

Respiratory Monitor For Asthma And Other Pulmonary Conditions

A patch sensor that is able to continuously monitor breathing rate and volume to diagnose pulmonary function and possibly predict and possibly prevent fatal asthma attacks.

Platform for predicting a compound’s cardioactivity

The invention is a platform that combines a screening system and machine learning algorithms to investigate and report the cardio-activity related information of a certain compound. Through screening cardiac tissue strips, the platform determines whether a compound is cardio-active or not, as well as the associated cardio-active mechanism based on a drug library that is automatically developed. Such information is crucial for the drug development process, especially for evidence based decisions.

Electrode Agnostic, Supply Variant Stimulation Engine For Implantable Neural Stimulation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented an innovative universal agnostic electrode for implantable neural stimulation and sensing.

A High Dynamic-Range Sensing Front-End For Neural Signal Recording Systems

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel neural recording chopper amplifier for neuromodulation systems that can simultaneously record and stimulate.

Affordable, Wearable Multi-Modal Bio-Sensing Platform for Monitoring EEG, PPG, Eye-Gaze, and Limb Dynamics

Electroencephalogram (EEG) systems have experienced a renewed interest by the research community for use in non-clinical studies.  A major challenge is that the hardware and software typically used to make measurements limit their use to controlled environments. Additionally, the low spatial resolution of EEG itself limits the amount of usable information that can be extracted from noise in dynamic recording environments. Lastly, the absence of a method to automatically extract user-environment interactions for tagging with EEG data introduces an immense overhead to researchers - having to manually tag events or limit experimental design by requiring the subjects to provide information during the experiments.  There are numerous sensors capable of measuring useful metrics for human behavior and interactions, however, limitations in the collection hardware and soft-ware hinder their use in experiments spanning multiple modalities.

Wireless In Situ Sensors in Stents for the Treatment and Monitoring of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD)

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel wireless sensor for external and internal biosensing applications.

Selective Transfer Of A Thin Pattern From Layered Material Using A Patterned Handle

Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman",serif; mso-fareast-language:JA;} Van der Waals crystals are a class of materials composed of stacked layers. Individual layers are single- or few-atoms thick and exhibit unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, and are thus expected to see widespread adoption in devices across a range of fields such as optical, electronic, sensing, and biomedical devices.  Graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides offer desirable properties as few-layer or monolayer film. Accessing the monolayer form in a repeatable fashion, as part of a predictable and high-yield manufacturing process is critical to realizing the many potential applications of two-dimensional materials at scale. In order to fabricate devices made from few- or monolayer materials, layer(s) of material of specified size and shape, arranged in a pre-determined pattern, must be deposited on a desired substrate and conventional transfer methods include pressure-sensitive adhesives and other viscoelastic polymers and require applied pressure to adhere to their target which can cause out-of-plane deformations and problems with isolating and transferring the patterned few- or monolayer material. Deep etching has similar drawbacks.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered methods and compositions that enable the transfer medium to adhere strictly to patterned regions, allowing the transfer to remove only patterned material and leave behind unpatterned bulk. This method involves the creation of an intermediate layer between the source material and the transfer medium. Because this layer must strictly cover patterned material, it serves as an etch mask for isolating few-layer material in the desired pattern. Any material which is microns-thick, patternable at the desired lateral pattern scale (likely micron-scale), and subsequently removable would make a suitable intermediate layer. 

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