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Browse Category: Sensors & Instrumentation > Biosensors

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Templated Synthesis Of Metal Nanorods

Brief description not available

Biosensor - Comprised of “Turn-on” Probes - with the Ability to Detect DNA Sequences in Living Cells

Researchers have developed a split-enzyme system that can detect genetic information in living cells by using luciferase linked to programmable DNA-binding domains.

Magnetically Responsive Photonic Nanochains

Brief description not available

Inter-Brain Measurements for Matching Applications

This technology utilizes inter-subject measurement of brain activity for the purpose of matching individuals. In particular, the invention measures the similarity and differences in neural activity patterns between interacting individuals (either in person or online) as a signature measurement for their matching capabilities. Relevant applications can be in the world of human resources (e.g., building collaborative teams), patient-therapist matching and others. The application relies on the utilization of both custom and commercial devices for measuring brain activity.

Flexthrough: A Recirculation Mechanism In Point Of Care CD Microfluidic Using Elastic Membrane

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine have developed a new method and device to efficiently mix and analyze liquid samples on CD-based point of care devices.

FlexThrough: a recirculation mechanism in point of care CD microfluidic using elastic membrane

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine have developed a new method and device to efficiently mix and analyze liquid samples on CD-based point of care devices.

Deep Learning Techniques For In Vivo Elasticity Imaging

Imaging the material property distribution of solids has a broad range of applications in materials science, biomechanical engineering, and clinical diagnosis. For example, as various diseases progress, the elasticity of human cells, tissues, and organs can change significantly. If these changes in elasticity can be measured accurately over time, early detection and diagnosis of different disease states can be achieved. Elasticity imaging is an emerging method to qualitatively image the elasticity distribution of an inhomogeneous body. A long-standing goal of this imaging is to provide alternative methods of clinical palpation (e.g. manual breast examination) for reliable tumor diagnosis. The displacement distribution of a body under externally applied forces (or displacements) can be acquired by a variety of imaging techniques such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance, and digital image correlation. A strain distribution, determined by the gradient of a displacement distribution, can be computed (or approximated) from measured displacements. If the strain and stress distributions of a body are both known, the elasticity distribution can be computed using the constitutive elasticity equations. However, there is currently no technique that can measure the stress distribution of a body in vivo. Therefore, in elastography, the stress distribution of a body is commonly assumed to be uniform and a measured strain distribution can be interpreted as a relative elasticity distribution. This approach has the advantage of being easy to implement. The uniform stress assumption in this approach, however, is inaccurate for an inhomogeneous body. The stress field of a body can be distorted significantly near a hole, inclusion, or wherever the elasticity varies. Though strain-based elastography has been deployed on many commercial ultrasound diagnostic-imaging devices, the elasticity distribution predicted based on this method is prone to inaccuracies.To address these inaccuracies, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a de novo imaging method to learn the elasticity of solids from measured strains. Our approach involves using deep neural networks supervised by the theory of elasticity and does not require labeled data for the training process. Results show that the Berkeley method can learn the hidden elasticity of solids accurately and is robust when it comes to noisy and missing measurements.

Compositions and Methods of Isothermal Nucleic Acid Detection

An improved method for isothermal nucleic acid detection based on a loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique that can be broadly applied for nucleic acid diagnostics.LAMP is an isothermal amplification method that amplifies DNA or RNA. This iteration of LAMP allows for the integration of any short DNA sequence, including tags, restriction enzyme sites, or promoters, into an isothermally amplified amplicon. The technique presented by the inventors allows for the insertion of sequence tags up to 35 nt into the flanking regions of the LAMP amplicon using the forward and backward inner primers (FIP and BIP), and loop primers. The inventors have demonstrated insertion of sequence fragments into the 5’ and middle regions of the FIP and BIP primers, and the 5’ region of the loop primers. In some embodiments, the sequence tag comprises a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, which is then incorporated into the LAMP amplicon (termed RT-LAMP/T7). With the addition of T7 polymerase, the amplicon can be in vitro transcribed, leading to additional amplification of the target molecule into an RNA substrate. This improves the efficiency of the amplification reaction and enables substrate conversion into different nucleic acid types.In other embodiments, the amplified RNA sequence can be detected by CRISPR enzymes, such as RNA-targeting Cas13 systems. 

Personalized Oncology Drug Efficacy Monitoring Chip

Researchers at UCI have developed a novel microfluidic-based platform that enables personalized drug screening of patient-derived cancer cells. This versatile device features real-time, continuous screening of patient samples without the need for expensive labeling reagents, large sample sizes, or bulky readout equipment.

A Wearable Freestanding Electrochemical Sensing System

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a strategy for high-fidelity, wearable biomarker data acquisition and sensor integration with consumer electronics.

A Fully Integrated Stretchable Sensor Arrays for Wearable Sign Language Translation To Voice

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel machine learning assisted wearable sensor system for the direct translation of sign language into voice with high performance.

A Wireless Textile Based Sensor System for Self-Powered Personalized Health Care

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a textile-based sensor system (TS system) for wireless, wearable biomonitoring.

Unobtrusive Fetal Heartrate Monitoring In The Daily Life

A novel wearable, unobtrusive flexible patch designed to facilitate continuous monitoring of fetal heart rate (fHR) and ECG by pregnant women in a home setting.

Composition and Methods of a Nuclease Chain Reaction for Nucleic Acid Detection

This invention leverages the nuclease activity of CRISPR proteins for the direct, sensitive detection of specific nucleic acid sequences. This all-in-one detection modality includes an internal Nuclease Chain Reaction (NCR), which possesses an amplifying, feed-forward loop to generate an exponential signal upon detection of a target nucleic acid.Cas13 or Cas12 enzymes can be programmed with a guide RNA that recognizes a desired target sequence, activating a non-specific RNase or DNase activity. This can be used to release a detectable label. On its own, this approach is inherently limited in sensitivity and current methods require an amplification of genetic material before CRISPR-base detection. 

Mechanisms and Devices Enabling Arbitrarily Shaped, Deep-Subwavelength, Acoustic Patterning

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a Compliant Membrane Acoustic Patterning (CAMP) technology capable of patterning cells in an arbitrary pattern at a high resolution over a large area.

Development Of Biosensors For Drought Stress In Plants

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a prototype biosensor that can monitor detectable levels of hormones present in plants experiencing drought or other environmental stress.

A Wearable Platform for In-Situ Analysis of Hormones

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a highly sensitive, wearable hormone monitoring platform.

Ultra-Low Cost, Transferrable and Thermally Stable Sensor Array Patterned on Conductive Substrate for Biofluid Analysis

UCLA researchers from the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel biosensor array that is ultra-low cost and thermally stable. It prolongs the lifetime of electrode modules of sensor products and allows for extended sensing operation in uncontrolled environments.

In-Situ Sweat Rate Monitoring For Normalization Of Sweat Analyte Concentrations

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a method of in-situ sweat rate monitoring, which can be integrated into wearable consumer electronics for physiological analyses.

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