Available Technologies

No technologies match these criteria.
Schedule UC TechAlerts to receive an email when technologies are published that match this search. Click on the Save Search link above

Find technologies available for licensing from UC Irvine.

Quality interference from living digital twins in IoT-enabled manufacturing systems

Researchers at UCI have developed a non-intrusive method for building a virtual replica of manufacturing machine, which allows for accurate diagnostics of the state of the system. This provides manufacturers with real-time information on quality control and immediately identifies any malfunctions in the system.

A Simple Integrated Device For Assessing Lung Health

Chronic lung diseases, like asthma, impose critical challenges on both the patients and the physicians due to the complexity of the diseases. Not only are these diseases tough to accurately assess, many of the diseases can be impacted by other physical and sociological factors. Perhaps a greater difficulty lies in measuring the effectiveness and compliance of the medications including inhaled medications. The invention discovered at the University of California, Irvine, is an “all-in-one,” portable device that offers complete assessment of lung health. It also incorporates a novel technology for monitoring the effectiveness and compliance of a medication, thereby, providing a personalized treatment and care plan for adults and children with asthma.

Chemical reagents for natural and modified nucleoside triphosphates synthesis

Traditional synthesis of nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), the building blocks of our genetic material, requires expensive purification yet produces small scale quantities. UCI researchers have developed novel reagents as well as a synthetic route that enables cost-effective and larger scale production of NTPs critical for biomedical research, as well as in certain diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

Polarization mode dispersion-based physical layer key generation for optical fiber link security

Researchers at UCI have developed a novel method for encrypting optical communications, which is simpler, less expensive, and less computationally-demanding than standard solutions.

Security Key Generation Technique for Inter-Vehicular Visible Light Communication

The invention is a technique that provides a novel, reliable and secure cryptography solution for inter-vehicular visible light communication. Through combining unique data as the road roughness and the driving behavior, a symmetric security key is generated for both communicating vehicles. As the data used is unique to the communicating vehicles only, the generated keys are thus unique, securing a reliable communication channel between both vehicles.

Physical Multi-Layer Arm Phantom For Body Area Networks

Researchers at UCI have developed an oil-based in vitro phantom that accurately mimics the electrical properties of the human arm. Due to the increased accuracy it affords, this phantom can be used to test the efficiencies of wireless medical devices in body area networks.

Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Iron Nitrides Using Two-Step Reactive Milling Process

Nanocrystalline iron nitride is an important soft magnetic material; however, conventional methods of production don’t exist. Synthesis of dense nanocrystalline iron nitrides is not possible by simply annealing elemental iron in NH3 at temperatures in excess of 600° C since g’-Fe4N and other iron nitrides are unstable above 600°C and will decompose. Sandia researchers have discovered that by using a two-step reactive milling process and high pressure spark plasma sintering (SPS) they can quickly and efficiently fabricate bulk g’-Fe4N parts.

Multi Layered Microfluidic Devices For In Vitro Large Scale Perfused Capillary Networks

"Organ-on-a-chip” technologies allow recapitulation of organ systems in vitro and can be utilized for drug response and toxicity studies, which are required in preclinical studies. However, current recapitulations via “organ-on-a-chip” technologies are limited because the designs do not fully reflect physiological complexity. To address this, UC Irvine inventors have developed a device to better mimic the vascular network of the circulatory system.