Learn more about UC TechAlerts – Subscribe to categories and get notified of new UC technologies

Browse Category: Medical > Disease: Ophthalmology and Optometry

Categories

[Search within category]

Clinical Prognostication Test In Uveal Melanoma

Uveal melanoma commonly known as ocular or choroidal melanoma, is a rare cancer of the eye. It is an intraocular malignancy that arises from melanocytes of the choroid, ciliary body, and iris of the eye. Ocular melanoma is diagnosed in approximately 2,000-2,500 adults annually in the United States. In both the U.S. and Europe, this equates to about 5 - 7.5 cases per million people per year and, for people over 50 years old, the incidence rate increases to around 21 per million per year. While the primary tumor is highly treatable, about half of the patients will develop metastasis —typically to the liver. Metastatic disease is universally fatal. While traditional staging methods such as tumor size and location, still play a role in assessing metastatic risk, they are rarely used to individualize patient management plans. Newer methods include chromosomal gene expression analysis, yet these methods have their technical limitations. Clearly, what is needed is a better, cheaper and reproducible prognostic test.

In Vivo Retinal Imaging via Improved Visible Light Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a technique that integrates multiple technological innovations to use visible light OCT for improved retinal imaging.

Vaccines Against Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections affect billions of patients worldwide and can manifest its symptoms as painful blisters or ulcers at oral, ocular or genital locations. Symptomatic patients can currently only alleviate their pains with antiviral medication. These technologies propose a shift in focus toward novel protective epitopes as the foundation for new vaccines.

Methods of Diagnosing Ocular Diseases

Researchers at UCLA have developed a novel technique to detect ocular diseases.

Ocular Therapeutics Using Stem Cell Microvesicles

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Ophthalmology have invented a method of using human embryonic stem cell microvesicles (hESMVs) to induce the regenerative capacity of several tissues, in particular, the ability to induce reconstruction of diseased retinas.

Inhibition Of Lipofuscin Aggregation By Molecular Tweezers

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Neurology and Molecular Therapy & Medical Genetics have developed a novel approach toward broad inhibition of lipofuscin aggregation.

Docking System To Stabilize Eyeball During Intraocular Surgery

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering have designed a docking system to secure the eyeball relative to the imaging-system probe, allowing for the use of surgical instruments or tools, and facilitate real-time image acquisition during intraocular surgery.

Rapid And Precise Tool Exchange Mechanism For Intraocular Robotic Surgical Systems

UCLA researchers from the Department of Mechanical Engineering have developed a rapid, precise, and repeatable tool exchange mechanism for intraocular surgical procedures. This mechanism reduces surgery time, undesirable surgical tool movements, complications, and recovery time.

Intraoperative Assessment Of Implant Positioning

Researchers from the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Ophthalmology led by Dr. Jean-Pierre Hubschman have developed a modified intralocular lens (IOL) and surgical implantation procedure to treat cataract and refractive anomalies.

Vaccine Against Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections affect billions of patients worldwide and can manifest its symptoms as painful blisters or ulcers at oral, ocular or genital locations. Symptomatic patients can currently only alleviate their pains with antiviral medication. This technology proposes a shift in focus toward novel protective epitopes as the foundation for new vaccines.

Novel Therapy for Treating Fungal Infection of the Cornea

Fungal keratitis is an infection of the cornea caused by pathogenic fungi that is challenging to treat. This therapy is a novel topical application of a commercially-available malarial drug to treat fungal keratitis with fewer side effects than current treatments.

Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes for the Treatment of Corneal Scarring

UCLA researchers in the Department of Ophthalmology have developed a novel method to heal corneal scarring using exosomes from immortalized corneal stem cells.

Safe Vector for Glaucoma Gene Therapy

UCLA researchers from the Department of Ophthalmology have developed a novel gene therapy approach to cure eye diseases such as glaucoma using naked plasmid DNA.

Method for creating a macular/retinal degeneration animal model

Researchers at UCI have developed an animal model that mimics the onset and progression of age-related macular degeneration, an incurable disease that is the fourth-leading cause of blindness globally. The model serves as a means for testing the efficacy of possible treatments and cures.

Anti-Microbial Contact Lens With Ocular Drug Delivery

Anti-microbial, anti-fungal drug eluting contact lens for the controlled release of ophthalmic therapeutics.

Novel Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal Nanopillared Surface

Medical devices are susceptible to contamination by harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, which form biofilms on device surfaces. These biofilms are often resistant to antibiotics and other current treatments, resulting in over 2 million people per year suffering from diseases related to these contaminating microbes. Death rates for many of these diseases are high, often exceeding 50%. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel anti-bacterial and anti-fungal biocomposite that incorporates a nanopillared surface structure that can be applied as a coating to medical devices.

Nonlinear Optical Photodynamic Therapy of the Cornea for Treatment of Low Refractive Errors

Inventors at UC Irvine have developed an apparatus and method using nonlinear optical photodynamic therapy (NLO-PDT) for modifying corneal shape and treating progressive corneal astigmatism and refractive errors. The selectively focused femtosecond-near infrared laser light and apparatus improves upon existing methods by providing rapid (< 1min) corneal treatment that minimizes unwanted cellular damage to the eye through precise lateral and axial treatment to the cornea.

Novel Surgical Device for Scleral Buckling Retinal Detachment Repair

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Engineering have developed a new surgical device used in retinal detachment surgery.

Sieve Container For Contactless Media Exchange For Cell Growth

Media that contains nutrients and growth factors is necessary to grow all types of cells, a process that is widely used in many fields of research. Such media should be routinely changed either to different media or a fresh batch of the same media. This change currently involves either using a pipette to transfer cells from their current dish of media to a new dish, or aspirating the media out of the dish and replacing it with new media. Both methods have inherent risks to stressing and damaging the cells. Researchers at UCI have developed a unique dish for growing cells that allows for safer aspiration of the old media, which reduces stress and damage to the cells.

Scanning Method For Uniform, Normal-Incidence Imaging Of Spherical Surface With A Single Beam

UCLA researchers have created a method that achieves uniform normal-incident illumination of a spherical surface by first projecting the sphere onto a Cartesian plane and then raster scanning it using an illuminating beam. This allows the scanned object, the illumination source, and the detector to remain stationary.

Xenobiotic-Free Culture System To Expand Human Limbal Stem Cells

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Opthalmology have developed a xenobiotic-free manufacturing process to produce transplantable human limbal stem cells for use in treating limbal stem cell deficiency.

Induction of Corneal Endothelial Cells

Ocular degenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, and corneal endothelial dystrophy (CED) cause irreversible vision loss and affect millions of people worldwide. Currently, there is no effective drug intervention. Grafting healthy eye cells to replenish the diseased tissues such as retina represents a promising therapeutic approach. However, previous attempts at using primary human eye cells have met with limited success due to the limited expansion capacity and differentiation potential of adult progenitors or difficulty of obtaining sufficient human fetal retinal progenitors, and possible ethical concerns. Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent promising renewable donor sources for cell-based replacement therapy. Nevertheless, PSCs themselves are not suitable for direct transplantation in clinical applications due to their tendency to form teratomas and low efficiency in repopulating host tissues with desirable reprogrammed cell types in vivo. While the advancement of clinical trials of hESC-derived RPE transplants for treatment of patients with Stargardt's macular dystrophy and AMD is encouraging to the field, there is a great need for methods of generating unlimited other specialized eye cells effectively in vitro for treating blindness due to the loss of photoreceptors, RGCs and CECs. Therefore, there is a major interest in development of in vitro expandable cell sources for engineering corneal endothelium.

Wireless Implantable System To Restore Memory

UCLA researchers have developed a wireless implantable deep brain stimulation system to restore memory in individuals with traumatic brain injury.

Intraocular Pressure measuring device

The present invention discloses a small device to measure Intraocular Pressure. This invention communicating the measurements of Intraocular pressure with outside devices.

Artificial cornea implant using nanopatterned synthetic polymer

Corneal blindness accounts for 50% of blindness in developing countries and artificial corneas need in scenarios in which a donor cornea is unusable or unavailable. Artificial corneas suffer from a myriad of problems ranging from mechanically weak corneas at junction sites to the necessity of lifetime antibiotic administration for the patient. This technology is a one piece artificial cornea that is biocompatible, durable and naturally antimicrobial/antibacterial.

  • Go to Page: