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Therapeutic Approach To Prevent Or Alleviate Drug-, Noise- And Age-Related Hearing Loss

UCLA researchers in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery have developed a novel therapeutic approach to treating hearing loss using inflammation-resolving molecules.

An Anaerobic Photo-Fermentation Processes For Production Of Volatile Non-Methane Hydrocarbons

An anaerobic process to produce non-methane hydrocarbon gases from organic and inorganic substrates.

Multi-Staged Gutta Percha Biomaterial Embedded With Nanodiamond Matrix

UCLA researchers in the Department of Oral Biology have developed a novel root canal filling material composed of gutta percha modified with nanodiamond matrix with or without antibiotic agents.

DNA Nanotechnology for Quick and Sensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids in Point-of-Care (POC) Diagnosis Applications

Researchers led by Dino Di Carlo from the Department of Bioengineering at UCLA have developed a quick, cheap, and accurate method to diagnose viral or bacterial infections.

Functionalized Titanium Implants And Related Regenerative Materials

UCLA researchers in the Department of Dentistry have developed novel titanium surfaces with enhanced bioactivity in implants and tissue regeneration.

Antibody Selection to Prevent or Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Therapeutic antibodies have been developed to prevent or slow the cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but with limited clinical success to date. These treatment failures suggest that antibodies vary in their therapeutic efficacy and that more effective antibodies or combinations of antibodies need to be identified. To address this issue, researchers at UCI have developed a novel screening platform that can identify antibodies that may prevent or treat AD or other neurodegenerative disorders with high efficacy from human blood.

Cyclopentadiene Compounds For Use In Bioorthogonal Coupling Reactions

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry have developed bioorthogonal coupling reactions for labelling biomolecules with molecular probes.

Approach For Efficient Protein Incorporation Into Recombinant Vaults

UCLA researchers in the departments of Medicine, Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, and Bioengineering have developed a novel method for loading protein payloads into vault nanoparticle carriers.

Brain Penetrant EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Molecular & Medical Pharmacology, and Neurology have discovered novel anti-tumor compounds for treatment of brain cancer.

Genome-Wide Identification Of Immune Evasion Functions In A Virus

UCLA researchers in the Department of Pharmacology have discovered a novel approach toward generating live attenuated influenza vaccines with improved immune response in vivo.

Protein Translation Machinery One Shot (TraMOS) Tool

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a microbial culture capable of translating mRNA molecules into a polypeptide with a single reaction mixture.

Methods for Enhancing Cell Populations for Articular Cartilage Repair

Cartilage lesion treatments require expanding cells from healthy donor cartilage which have limited availability and restricted potential to produce cartilage. This invention overcomes these challenges, presenting chemical and physical methods for enhancing cell populations capable of producing neocartilage. According to a 2015 global market report, tissue engineering technologies are expected to reach over 94B USD by 2022.

Methods for Producing Neocartilage with Functional Potential

Cell expansion for cartilage tissue production usually leads to loss of the potential to produce cartilage, which impedes uses for cartilage repair. This invention features methods and systems for producing highly expanded primary cells to construct functional neocartilage and other neotissue. According to a 2015 global market report, tissue engineering technologies are expected to reach over 94B USD by 2022.

Endoribonucleases For Rna Detection And Analysis

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Bacteria and archaea possess adaptive immune systems that rely on small RNAs for defense against invasive genetic elements. CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) genomic loci are transcribed as long precursor RNAs, which must be enzymatically cleaved to generate mature CRISPR-derived RNAs (crRNAs) that serve as guides for foreign nucleic acid targeting and degradation. This processing occurs within the repetitive sequence and is catalyzed by a dedicated CRISPR-associated (Cas) family member in many CRISPR systems.  Endoribonucleases that process CRISPR transcripts are bacterial or archaeal enzymes capable of catalyzing sequence- and structure- specific cleavage of a single- stranded RNA. These enzymes cleave a specific phosphodiester bond within a specific RNA sequence.  UC Berkeley researchers discovered variant Cas endoribonucleases, nucleic acids encoding the variant Cas endoribonucleases, and host cells genetically modified with the nucleic acids that can be used, potentially in conjunction with Cas9, to detect a specific sequence in a target polyribonucleotide and of regulating production of a target RNA in a eukaryotic cell.  For example, it was found that the variant Cas endoribonuclease has an amino acid substitution at a histidine residue such that is is enzymatically inactive in the absence of imidazole and is activatable in the presence of imidazole.  

dCas9 Epigenome Editing Toolkit

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a dCas9 toolkit for human epigenome editing.

Colorimetric Sensing Of Amines

An affordable and easily synthesized indicator that can be applied to monitor reaction progress in a system using only one inexpensive and non-toxic agent.

Electrical Conduction In A Cephalopod Structural Protein

Fabricating materials from naturally occurring proteins that are inherently biocompatible enables the resulting material to be easily integrated with many downstream applications, ranging from batteries to transistors. In addition, protein-based materials are also advantageous because they can be physically tuned and specifically functionalized. Inventors have developed protein-based material from structural proteins such as reflectins found in cephalopods, a molluscan class that includes cuttlefish, squid, and octopus. In a space dominated by artificial, man-made proton-conducting materials, this material is derived from naturally occurring proteins.

A Highly Error-Prone Orthogonal Replication System For Targeted Continuous Evolution In Vivo

Inventors at UC Irvine have engineered an orthogonal DNA replication system capable of rapid, accelerated continuous evolution. This system enables the directed evolution of specific biomolecules towards user-defined functions and is applicable to problems of protein, enzyme, and metabolic pathway engineering.

Hydrogel Scaffold for 3D Tissue Culture

Prof. Jin Nam and his colleagues at the University of California, Riverside have developed a hybrid scaffold which combines a thermosensitive hydrogel, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PEG-PNIPAAm), with a biodegradable polymer, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), into a composite, electrospun microfibrous structure. The electrospun structure enables a structurally self-supporting hybrid scaffold which requires a simple inoculation of cell-containing media to encapsulate cells in a 3D hydrogel within a network of PEG-PNIPAAm/PCL microfibers. This novel hybrid scaffold enhanced chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), resulting in superior mechanical properties of the cell/scaffold constructs as compared to those of the pure forms of its constitutive components. The hybrid scaffold enables a  single-step uniform cell seeding process to inoculate cells within a 3D hydrogel with the potential for various tissue engineering applications. Figure 1. Schematic of electrospun hybrid scaffolds for moldless 3D cell encapsulation in hydrogel. Thermosensitive PEG-PNIPAAm composited with PCL was electrospun to produce thick (~ 2.5 mm) hybrid scaffolds composed of micro-sized fibers. Large pores allow uniform cell infiltration upon seeding throughout the thickness of the scaffolds at room temperature. Subsequent increase in temperature to 37 °C induces the PEG-PNIPAAm to gelate to encapsulate the uniformly seeded cells in 3D.  

Compositions Of Polyion Complex Polypeptide Hydrogels

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a new class of cell-compatible copolypeptide hydrogels that possess chain conformation directed polyion complex (PIC) supramolecular architectures.

Type V CRISPR/CAS Effector Proteins for Cleaving ssDNA and Detecting Target DNA

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Class 2 CRISPR–Cas systems (e.g., type V CRISPR/Cas systems such as Cas12 family systems) are characterized by effector modules that include a single effector protein. For example, in a type V CRISPR/Cas system, the effector protein - a CRISPR/Cas endonuclease (e.g., a Cas12a protein) - interacts with (binds to) a corresponding guide RNA (e.g., a Cas12a guide RNA) to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is targeted to a particular site in a target nucleic acid via base pairing between the guide RNA and a target sequence within the target nucleic acid molecule.  Thus, like CRISPR-Cas9, Cas12 has been harnessed for genome editing based on its ability to generate targeted, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered that RNA-guided DNA binding unleashes indiscriminate single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) cleavage activity by Cas12a that completely degrades ssDNA molecules. The researchers found that target-activated, non-specific ssDNase cleavage is also a property of other type V CRISPR-Cas12 enzymes. By combining Cas12a ssDNase activation with isothermal amplification, the researchers were able to achieve attomolar sensitivity for DNA detection.  For example, rapid and specific detection of human papillomavirus in patient samples was achieved using these methods and compositions.   

Respiratory Monitor For Asthma And Other Pulmonary Conditions

A patch sensor that is able to continuously monitor breathing rate and volume to diagnose pulmonary function and possibly predict and possibly prevent fatal asthma attacks.

Immunotherapy Against Aß-Mediated Inhibition of ADAM10 Activity

UCLA researchers in the Department of Neurology have developed a novel immunotherapy targeting a previously unexplored pathway of Aβ toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease.

Breast Milk as a Source, Incubation/Storage Medium, and Delivery System for Infant Mucosal Immunity Bacteriophage

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to harvest and enrich symbiotic bacteriophage to promote bacterial immunity.

Injectable Novel Therapeutic for Post-Myocardial Infarction Repair

Cardiovascular disease manifested as a myocardial infarction (MI) usually results in the irreversible death of heart muscle cells. While medical treatments can mitigate some symptoms, they often fail to prevent heart failure after a MI. The current standard of care for MI relies on surgical intervention via a coronary artery bypass. An alternative therapeutic approach has been taken in the last few years with the introduction of biomaterials designed to promote neovascularization after an MI and help prevent negative left ventricle remodeling by increasing infarct wall thickness and decreasing volume, fibrosis, and infarct size. 

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