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Conductive-Organometallic Framework

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry have developed organic metallic framework (MOF) materials with high porosity and conductivity capabilities.

High Performance Platinum-Based Catalyst Combined with Carbon Support Engineering

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a fuel cell catalyst system comprised of platinum-based alloys with a novel carbon support. The fuel cell has improved mass activity targets and increased stability.

Metal Triazolites

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel metal-organic framework (MOF) using triazole ligands that allows for facile modification with a variety of metals, which has unique gas separation and adsorption properties.

Highly Durable and Active Fuel Cell Electro-Catalyst Designed with Hybrid Support

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have demonstrated an innovative electrocatalyst design with a hybrid support for fuel cells that can dramatically increase the lifetime of the catalyst, as well as its activity.

Stable Alloy Of Palladium Hydride With High Hydrogen Content

Researchers led by Yu Huang from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA have developed a cheap and simple way to create palladium hydride with high hydrogen content.

High Performance PtNiCuMo Electrochemical Catalyst

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed multimetallic PtNiCuMo nano octahedral catalyst that has demonstrated greatly improved mass activity, specific activity, and stability for application in fuel cells.

Intensified Energetically Enhanced Reforming

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have designed a method to intensify the steam-methane reforming process used to industrially produce hydrogen.

Robust Mesoporous Nife-Based Catalysts For Energy Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have used selective dealloying method to produce novel high-performance, robust, and ultrafine mesoporous NiFeMn-based metal/metal oxide composite oxygen-evolving catalysts.

Energetically Enhanced Reforming Process

UCLA researchers from the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering have developed a method of generating hydrogen through steam reforming that does not require the large amounts of applied heat needed in conventional reforming processes.This presents the opportunity to greatly reduce operational costs associated with hydrogen generation.The method does not introduce air or oxygen to the reforming mixture, thereby avoiding the explosion hazard that is introduced by autothermal reforming.

Low-Pressure High-Capacity Storage System for Sustainable Hydrogen Economy

Hydrogen-fueled cell vehicles could gain ground as global researchers develop better processes to produce hydrogen economically from sustainable resources like solar and wind. On an energy-to-weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times the energy content of gasoline (120 megajoule or MJ, per kilogram or kg, for hydrogen, versus 44 MJ/kg for gasoline). One problem is storing enough hydrogen on-board to achieve a reasonable driving range of 300 to 400 miles. On energy-to-volume basis, hydrogen takes up nearly three times the volume of gasoline (8 MJ/liter for cryogenic liquid hydrogen versus 32 MJ/liter for gasoline). Another problem is related to next-generation solid absorbents like metal hydrides, which typically show weakness in terms of the amount of gas that can be absorbed and delivered. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have developed a composite material using nanostructured metal hydrides that is capable of storing three times more hydrogen per volume at room temperature than a comparable cryogenic liquid hydrogen tank. Furthermore, low hydrogen pressures during absorbing and desorbing have been achieved. This represents a significant economic and safety advantage over technologically complex and costly high-pressure (10,000 psi) hydrogen tanks commonly used in mobile hydrogen storage applications today.

Multi-Junction Artificial Photosynthetic Cell With Enhanced Photovoltages

UC Santa Barbara researchers have developed multi-junction photosynthetic units with novel architecture.

Recirculating Noble Gas Internal Combustion Power Cycle

Conventional power conversion cycles which turn fuel into heat and heat into power are constrained by basic thermodynamic considerations. The most modern technologies have been limited to 60% even with multiple cycles combined (i.e. Brayton and Rankine combined cycle). Recent demonstrations have shown relative efficiency gains of 30% in both spark-ignited and compression-ignited regimes. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, are working to outdo these efforts by working on an ultra-high efficiency power cycle framework using argon as the working fluid. Early laboratory results suggest the argon engine could easily achieve 70% or greater thermal efficiency. Under such research the argon replaces nitrogen as the working fluid and is recycled in the closed-loop system.

Next-Generation Metal-Organic Frameworks With High Deliverable Capacities For Gas Storage Applications

There are many applications that require the storage of a high density of gas molecules. The driving range of vehicles powered by natural gas or hydrogen, for instance, is determined by the maximum density of gas that can be stored inside a fuel tank and delivered to the engine or fuel cell. In certain situations, it is desirable to lower the pressure or raise the temperature needed to store a given amount of gas through the use of an adsorbent. Developments in next-generation adsorbents, such as metal-organic frameworks and activated carbons, have shown certain weaknesses in terms of the amount of gas that can be delivered when an application has a minimum desorption pressure greater than zero and when a significant amount of heat is released during adsorption or cooling occurs during desorption. To help solve these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a next generation of materials using novel porous metal-organic frameworks that demonstrate unprecedented deliverable gas capacities. These engineered adsorbents maximize the amount of gas delivered during each adsorption/desorption cycle. This shows promise in developing next generation gas storage materials for applications with a wide range of operating conditions.

Microstructured Cathode for Self-Regulated Oxygen Generation and Consumption

UCLA researchers have developed a cathode that generates oxygen, consumes the oxygen as needed, and stops the oxygen generation when it is not consumed, all in a self-regulated fashion.

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