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(SD2021-377) Pressure-stabilized dual inlet gas mass spectrometry

Mass spectrometers for high precision gas isotope measurements (e.g., noble gases, carbon, nitrogen) are typically equipped with a dual inlet system in which one side contains the unknown sample gas and the second side contains a known standard. Repeated comparisons of the two gases allows precise determination of differences in the gas composition. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Scalable High Intensity Ultrashort Pulse Compressor And Cleaner

This invention is a high intensity ultrashort pulse compressor that filters out low intensity artifacts and is made with commercially available low-cost components. This integrated system also provides scalability and can therefore be used for a range of laser intensities.

Electric Ratchet Based Ion Pumps

UCI researchers developed a new device that uses electricity to drive ion separation across a membrane. This device can increase the energy efficiency of various applications such as artificial photosynthesis, water desalination, and chemical separations.

Automated Tip Conditioning ML-Based Software For Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques and associated spectroscopic (STS) methods, such as dI/dV point spectroscopy, have been widely used to measure electronic structures and local density of states of molecules and materials with unprecedented spatial and energy resolutions. However, the quality of dI/dV spectra highly depends on the shape of the probe tips, and atomically sharp tips with well-defined apex structures are required for obtaining reliable spectra. In most cases, STS measurements are performed in ultra-high vacuum  and low temperature (4 K) to minimize disturbances. Advance tip preparation and constant in situ tip conditioning are required before and during the characterization of target molecules and materials. A common way to prepare STM tips is to repetitively poke them on known and bare substrates (i.e. coinage metals or silicon) to remove contaminations and to potentially coat the tip with substrate atoms. The standard dI/dV spectra of the substrate is then used as a reference to determine whether the tip is available for further experiments. However, tip geometry changes during the poking process are unpredictable, and consequently tip conditioning is typically slow and needs to be constantly monitored. Therefore, it restricts the speed of high-quality STM spectroscopic studies. In order to make efficient use of instrument idle time and minimize the research time wasted on tip conditioning, UC Berkeley researchers developed software based on Python and machine learning that can automate the time-consuming tip conditioning processes. The program is designed to do tip conditioning on Au(111) surfaces that are clean or with low molecular coverage with little human intervention. By just one click, the program is capable of continued poking until the tip can generate near-publication quality spectroscopic data on gold surfaces. It can control the operation of a Scienta Omicron STM and automatically analyze the collected topographic images to find bare Au areas that are large enough for tip conditioning. It will then collect dI/dV spectra at selected positions and use machine learning models to determine their quality compared to standard dI/dV spectra for Au20 and determine if the tip is good enough for further STS measurements. If the tip condition is not ideal, the program will control the STM to poke at the identified positions until the machine learning model predicts the tip to be in good condition.

Software Defined Pulse Processing (SDPP) for Radiation Detection

Radiation detectors are typically instrumented with low noise preamplifiers that generate voltage pulses in response to energy deposits from particles (x-rays, gamma-rays, neutrons, protons, muons, etc.). This preamplifier signal must be further processed in order to improve the signal to noise ratio, and then subsequently estimate various properties of the pulse such as the pulse amplitude, timing, and shape. Historically, this “pulse processing” was carried out with complex, purpose-built analog electronics. With the advent of digital computing and fast analog to digital converters, this type of processing can be carried out in the digital domain.There are a number of commercial products that perform “hardware” digital pulse processing. The common element among these offerings is that the pulse processing algorithms are implemented in hardware (typically an FPGA or high performance DSP chip). However this hardware approach is expensive, and it's hard to tailor for a specific detector and application.To address these issues, researchers at UC Berkeley developed a solution that performs the pulse processing in software on a general purpose computer, using digital signal processing techniques. The only required hardware is a general purpose, high speed analog to digital converter that's capable of streaming the digitized detector preamplifier signal into computer memory without gaps. The Berkeley approach is agnostic to the hardware, and is implemented in such a way as to accommodate various hardware front-ends. For example, a Berkeley implementation uses the PicoScope 3000 and 5000 series USB3 oscilloscopes as the hardware front-end. That setup has been used to process the signal from a number of semiconductor and scintillator detectors, with results that are comparable to analog and hardware digital pulse processors.In comparison to current hardware solutions, this new software solution is much less expensive, and much more easily configurable. More specifically, the properties of the digital pulse shaping filter, trigger criteria, methods for estimating the pulse parameters, and formatting/filtering of the output data can be adjusted and tuned by writing simple C/C++ code.

Compositions and Methods of Isothermal Nucleic Acid Detection

An improved method for isothermal nucleic acid detection based on a loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique that can be broadly applied for nucleic acid diagnostics.LAMP is an isothermal amplification method that amplifies DNA or RNA. This iteration of LAMP allows for the integration of any short DNA sequence, including tags, restriction enzyme sites, or promoters, into an isothermally amplified amplicon. The technique presented by the inventors allows for the insertion of sequence tags up to 35 nt into the flanking regions of the LAMP amplicon using the forward and backward inner primers (FIP and BIP), and loop primers. The inventors have demonstrated insertion of sequence fragments into the 5’ and middle regions of the FIP and BIP primers, and the 5’ region of the loop primers. In some embodiments, the sequence tag comprises a T7 RNA polymerase promoter, which is then incorporated into the LAMP amplicon (termed RT-LAMP/T7). With the addition of T7 polymerase, the amplicon can be in vitro transcribed, leading to additional amplification of the target molecule into an RNA substrate. This improves the efficiency of the amplification reaction and enables substrate conversion into different nucleic acid types.In other embodiments, the amplified RNA sequence can be detected by CRISPR enzymes, such as RNA-targeting Cas13 systems. 

Novel Reflective Microscope Objective Lens For All Colors

The researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have developed a microscopic lens, made entirely of reflective curved surface, where all the light wavelengths are focused at the same time for better resolution and larger field view of the image.

Composition and Methods of a Nuclease Chain Reaction for Nucleic Acid Detection

This invention leverages the nuclease activity of CRISPR proteins for the direct, sensitive detection of specific nucleic acid sequences. This all-in-one detection modality includes an internal Nuclease Chain Reaction (NCR), which possesses an amplifying, feed-forward loop to generate an exponential signal upon detection of a target nucleic acid.Cas13 or Cas12 enzymes can be programmed with a guide RNA that recognizes a desired target sequence, activating a non-specific RNase or DNase activity. This can be used to release a detectable label. On its own, this approach is inherently limited in sensitivity and current methods require an amplification of genetic material before CRISPR-base detection. 

Microfluidic Dispenser for Automated, High-Precision, Liquids Handling

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a robotic dispensing interface that uses a microfluidic-embedded container cap – often referred to as a microfluidic Cap-to-Dispense or μCD - to seamlessly integrate robotic operations into precision liquids handling.

Mechanisms and Devices Enabling Arbitrarily Shaped, Deep-Subwavelength, Acoustic Patterning

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a Compliant Membrane Acoustic Patterning (CAMP) technology capable of patterning cells in an arbitrary pattern at a high resolution over a large area.

Inexpensive Wobbe Index Sensor to Measure Gaseous Fuel Quality

UCR researchers have developed an inexpensive sensor to measure the energy content and fuel quality of gaseous combustible fuel. This sensor estimates the Wobbe Index in real time time and costs about $10. The sensor is confirmed to operate between -20°and 70°Celsius under pressures of -3600 Psi, with an accuracy of ±1%.  Fig. 1 shows the predicted Wobbe Index vs Actual Wobble Index, showing the accuracy of the sensor

A Wearable Platform for In-Situ Analysis of Hormones

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a highly sensitive, wearable hormone monitoring platform.

Crosslinkable Polymer Coating Prevents Bacterial Infection on Implant Surface

UCLA researchers in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery have developed a polymer implant coating that mitigates bacterial infections on the implant surface.

Method and Apparatus for Movement Therapy Gaming System

Rehabilitation therapy, while an important tool for the long term recovery of patients affected by brain injury or disease, is expensive and requires one-on-one attention from a certified healthcare professional. UCI researchers have developed a computer-based system that provides arm movement therapy for patients. The system allows patients to independently practice hand and arm movements, improving therapeutic outcomes, while reducing hospital visits and cost for both patients and healthcare providers.

Flexible, Biocompatible Microfluidics-inspired Micro-reference Electrodes for Sensing Applications

Researchers at UCI have created miniaturized, flexible, biocompatible reference electrode with a streamline design capable of being used in a variety of different laboratory and clinical environments.

System For Fast Multi-Photon Imaging Using Spectrally Diffracted Excitation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a new system for fast multi-photon imaging using spectrally diffracted excitation.

Array Atomic Force Microscopy Enabling Simultaneous Multi-point and Multi-modal Nanoscale Analyses

Nanoscale multipoint structure-function analysis is essential for deciphering the complexity of multiscale physical and biological systems. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows nanoscale structure-function imaging in various operating environments and can be integrated seamlessly with disparate probe-based sensing and manipulation technologies. However, conventional AFMs only permit sequential single-point analysis. Widespread adoption of array AFMs for simultaneous multi-point study is still challenging due to the intrinsic limitations of existing technological approaches.

Near-Zero Power Fully Integrated CMOS Temperature Sensor

With the planned proliferation of the Internet-of-Things, billions of power limited wireless sensing devices are expected to be sold worldwide.  Within that group is a large subset of applications in which temperature sensing will be important.  Needed for this application space are ultra-small and ultra-low-power temperature sensors. 

Low-noise Low-power ADC for Direct Biopotential Recording in Neuroscience Applications

High-density multi-channel neural recording is critical to driving advances in neuroscience and neuroengineering through increasing the spatial resolution and dynamic range of brain-machine interfaces.  Neural signal acquisition ICs have conventionally been designed composed of two distinct functional blocks per recording channel: a low-noise amplifier front-end (AFE), and an analog-digital converter (ADC).  Hybrid architectures utilizing oversampling ADCs with digital feedback have seen recent adoption due to their increased power and area efficiency. However, input dynamic range (DR) is still relatively limited due to aggressive supply voltage scaling and/or capacitive sampling noise.

Cloud- enabled Wireless pH Monitoring in Laboratory Sample Vials

A team of inventors at UCI have developed a miniaturized, wireless pH sensing system capable of monitoring the pH of laboratory samples in real-time with cloud-enabled connections for data collection. The sensor is designed to fit into the caps of standard sample vials, providing continuous measurements and eliminating the need to open vials during sensing.

Multiplex Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry

Native mass spectrometry (MS), in which electrospray ionization (ESI) is used to transfer large macromolecules and macromolecular complexes directly from solution into the gas phase, is a powerful tool in structural biology.  However, charge-state distributions of individual components in mixtures of macromolecular complexes or synthetic polymers are often unresolved making it impossible to obtain mass information directly from an ESI mass spectrum. Other conventional methods can provide accurate masses of individual ions, but often at the expense of analysis time.     Weighing ions individually with charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) has the advantage that fast measurements are possible depending on the accuracy and sensitivity required. However, a limitation of trapping CDMS technology is the need to weigh single ions individually in order to eliminate potential interferences between the signals of multiple ions or ion-ion interactions that can potentially interfere with these measurements. UC researchers have created multiplex charge detection mass spectroscopy, particularly for high throughput single ion analysis of large molecules and measuring the masses of large molecules, macromolecular complexes and synthetic polymers that are too large or heterogeneous for conventional mass spectrometry measurements.  The new multiplexing method makes it possible to measure the masses of many ions simultaneously.  

Source Tracking Though Spectral Matching To Mass Spec Databases

Modern metabolomics, proteomics and natural product datasets have now reached into the millions of tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra. The rapidly growing size of these datasets precludes laborious manual data interpretation of all of the data. While MS/MS spectral library search approaches match spectra in an automated fashion, the limited size of available spectral libraries limits identification rates of datasets to single digit percentages. In addition, the sharing of experimental MS/MS data between researchers is not that common. What is needed is a way to organize both identified and unidentified spectra into structurally related molecular families that is searchable.

Selective Deposition Of Diamond In Thermal Vias

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering have developed a new method of diamond deposition in integrated circuit vias for thermal dissipation.

Flavonol Profile as a Sun Exposure Assessor for Grapes

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a solar radiation assessment method for grapes that uses a flavonol profile. This method can be done using either HPLC or through the computer processing of the absorption spectra of a purified flavonol extract via a purification kit.

Broadband Comb-Based Spectrum Sensing

Researchers at the UCLA Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering have developed a millimeter-wave spectrum analyzer that uses a non-linear fast switch to generate a broadband frequency comb local oscillator (LO) with a tunable repetition rate.

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