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EpiSort: A Novel Method Using Deep Bisulfite Sequencing to Determine Immune Cell Types in Solid Tissue Samples

EpiSort is a novel method of using DNA methylation patterns to determine the proportion of immune cell populations in solid tissue samples.

SHARPR-MPRA (Systematic High-Resolution Activation And Repression Profiling With Reporter-Tiling Massively Parallel Reporter Assay)

UCLA researchers in the Department of Biological Chemistry have developed a method to screen hundreds to thousands of genes to identify their regulatory functions.

A Novel CRISPR-based Screen for Personalized Cancer Therapy

Disease phenotypes are often regulated by interwoven genetic networks. For example, tumor genomes exhibit an extensive variety of genetic and epigenetic changes involved in tumor initiation, metastasis and ultimately, resistance to therapy. Combination therapy to target multiple pathways, as opposed to only single ones, can enhance treatment efficacy. Discovering effective combination therapies for human diseases is challenging with existing methods, due to the cost, effort, and labor required to construct and analyze each combination. There is a need for technological advances to accelerate the identification of effective combinatorial therapies. CRISPR has emerged as a new tool to systemically interrogate cancer genomes and set up the potential for personalized medicine. Personalized medicine is based upon the concept that individual differences can be identified and used to the patient’s advantage for therapy.

Methods for Generating Analogs of Coenzyme A for In Vivo and In Vitro Cellular Labeling

Selective chemical control of biochemical processes within a living cell enables the study and modification of natural biological systems in ways that may not be obtained through in vitro experiments. Accordingly, access to promiscuous metabolic pathways has provided a unique chemical entry into small molecule engineering in vivo. A method for covalent reporter labeling of carrier proteins using permissive phosphopantetheinyltransferase (PPTase) enzymes and reporter-labeled coenzyme A (CoA) has been commonly used but has been limited to in vitro and cell-surface protein labeling, as CoA derivatives have not been shown to penetrate the cell.

Microfluidics Device For Digestion Of Tissues Into Cellular Suspension

A microfluidic device that separates single cells from whole tissue in a rapid and gentle manner using hydrodynamic fluid flow. The separated single cell suspensions can then be used in tissue engineering applications, regenerative medicine and the study of cancer.

Sieve Container For Contactless Media Exchange For Cell Growth

Media that contains nutrients and growth factors is necessary to grow all types of cells, a process that is widely used in many fields of research. Such media should be routinely changed either to different media or a fresh batch of the same media. This change currently involves either using a pipette to transfer cells from their current dish of media to a new dish, or aspirating the media out of the dish and replacing it with new media. Both methods have inherent risks to stressing and damaging the cells. Researchers at UCI have developed a unique dish for growing cells that allows for safer aspiration of the old media, which reduces stress and damage to the cells.

Assay for Inhibitors of Nonsense-Mediated RNA Decay

Prof. Sika Zheng at UCR has developed a new endogenous NMD assay that is both sensitive and quantitative. The assay can be used on its own to assess changes in cellular NMD activity with high specificity and sensitivity. It can facilitate analysis of NMD controls by cellular pathways in response to stimuli or during development and is particularly suitable for unbiased screening of NMD modulators. The assay is designed to distinguish NMD regulation from transcriptional regulation and alternative splicing control.

Compound Library Made Through Phosphine-Catalyzed Annulation/Tebbe/Diels-Alder Reaction

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a small molecule library consisting of a large variety stereochemical variants.

In Situ Lipid Synthesis for Protein Reconstitution (INSYRT)

While current methods for membrane protein functional reconstitution in biomimetic membranes approaches are powerful and have uncovered fundamental properties of protein function, they are methodologically cumbersome, requiring chromatography steps to remove detergents. Moreover, structural features normally found in cell membranes such as curvature and polarity are mostly absent. In this regard, an efficient reconstitution methodology that better mimics the native chemical environment of a whole-cell embedded protein would be highly useful.

Process For Sorting Dispersed Colloidal Structures

Researchers from the Chemistry and Biochemistry department at UCLA have developed method of separating and/or sorting specific target structures from other non-target structures in a complex mixture using custom-made target-specific colloidal particles.

Methods For Predicting Response Patterns To Anti-PD-1 (aPD-1) Therapy In Metastatic Melanoma

Dr. Roger Lo and colleagues in the Department of Medicine at UCLA have identified a method to predict a melanoma patient’s resistance to pembrolizumab and other immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Nucleic Acid Tetramers For High Efficiency Multiplexed Cell Sorting

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology have a highly specific method of sorting cells by using multiplexed tetramers with unique DNA-oligomer signatures.

Label Free Assessment Of Embryo Vitality

Researchers at UC Irvine developed an independent non-invasive method to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy embryos.

Low Cost Wireless Spirometer Using Acoustic Modulation

The present invention relates to portable Spirometry system that uses sound to transmit pulmonary airflow information to a receiver.

Microfluidic Component Package

The present invention describes a component package that enables a microfluidic device to be fixed to a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) or other substrate, and embedded within a larger microfluidic system.

Microchambers With Solid-State Phosphorescent Sensor For Measuring Single Mitochondrial Respiration

The invention is a miniaturized device that assays the respiration of a single mitochondrion. Through a novel approach for measuring oxygen consumption rate, the device provides information on cell and tissue mitochondrial functional. This data is relevant for understanding human conditions associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as Alzheimer’s Disease and cancer.

Method and System for Ultra High Dynamic Range Nucleic Acid Quantification

Researchers at UC Irvine developed a device and method that combines the high dynamic range and high accuracy of digital PCR (dPCR) with the real-time analysis of quantitative PCR (qPCR) to achieve a ultra-high dynamic range PCR over 10 to 12 orders of magnitude. The present method is accomplished by a highly integrated design that optimally packs, thermocycles, and images as many as 1 million reaction vessels.

Next-generation broad-spectrum anti-cancer Rad51 inhibitors

This invention describes the design, synthesis and successful evaluation of a panel of novel Rad51 inhibitors to treat a broad spectrum of cancer types.

Novel Assay to Screen for Antiviral Therapeutics

Prof. Shou-wei Ding and colleagues at UCR have developed three different assays to screen for a new class of antiviral therapies. RNA interference (RNAi) directs antiviral innate immunity by producing virus-derived siRNAs (vsiRNAs). These assays screen for compounds that may be used to inhibit the activity of a distinct group of viral proteins known as viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs) essential for virus infection. The various assays may use Drosophila, rodent or human somatic cells. These same assays may also be used to identify new VSRs.

Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Sensors for Probing the Action of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor toolbox for the probing of G-protein coupled receptors.

Blood-based Molecular Pathology

The routine cancer screening tests are mainly lengthy processes, which can be invasive and costly. Blood-based screening is an attractive option, as routine medical visits offer the opportunity to collect blood samples that may be screened for signs of disease. Currently the available options are limited.

Siderophore-Based Immunization Against Gram-Negative Bacteria

Bacterial pathogens such as E. coli and Salmonella hijack the host’s iron to cause infection. This invention describes an immunization strategy for triggering an immune response against the iron-sequestering agent secreted by the pathogen, thus turning the bacterial virulence mechanism against itself, and thereby resulting in host immunity.

DNA Amplification by Electric Field Cycling (efc-PCR)

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a popular technique for amplifying and quantifying minute quantities of DNA. Technologies based on PCR are used for a wide range of applications, including forensics, disease detection, and laboratory tools. Researchers at UCI have developed a device that can implement a novel method for PCR based on voltage cycling as opposed to temperature cycling (the current method for PCR). This allows the device to be much more portable and compact than those currently available.

An ELISA with Broad Specificity for Cyanobaterial Hepatotoxins

Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) produce toxic chemical substances, which attack the liver. These toxins are call hepatotoxins and are found in fresh or brackish water worldwide. To prevent ingestion of harmful toxins in drinking water, researchers at UCI have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that detects more than 100 distinct chemical forms of cyanobacterial hepatotoxins.

High Throughput Label-Free One-Bead-One-Compound (OBOC) Screening Assay

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a high throughput, label-free One-Bead-One-Compound (OBOC) screening assay.

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