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Revolutionizing Micro-Array Technologies: A Microscopy Method and System Incorporating Nanofeatures

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel lensfree incoherent holographic microscope using a plasmonic aperture.

Holographic Opto-Fluidic Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a system for holographic opto-fluidic microscopy.

Lensfree Super-Resolution Holographic Microscopy Using Wetting Films On A Chip

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel lensfree super-resolution holographic microscope using wetting films on a chip.

Fluorescent Imaging Of Single Nano-Particles And Viruses On A Smart-Phone

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel field portable fluorescence microscope that can be used as a smart phone accessory.

Quantification Of Plant Chlorophyll Content Using Google Glass

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have invented a novel device that can quantify chlorophyll concentration in plants using a custom-designed Google Glass app.

High-Throughput And Label-Free Single Nanoparticle Sizing Based On Time-Resolved On-Chip Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a rapid, low-cost, and label-free methodology for nanoparticle sizing.

Pixel Super-Resolution Using Wavelength Scanning

UCLA researchers have developed a novel way to significantly improve the resolution of an undersampled or pixelated image.

Microscopic Color Imaging And Calibration

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a color calibration method for lens-free and mobile-phone microscopy images allowing for high resolution and accurate color reproduction.

Wide-Field Imaging Of Birefringent Crystals In Synovial Fluid Using Lens-Free Polarized Microscopy For Crystal Arthropathy Diagnosis

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a new diagnostic tool for arthropathic diseases, such as gout.

Imaging Cells In Flow Cytometer Using Spatial-Temporal Transformation

Flow cytometry analyzes multiple physical characteristics of a large population of single cells as cells flow in a fluid stream through an excitation light beam. Flow cytometers measure fluorescence and light scattering from which information about the biological and physical properties of individual cells are obtained. Although flow cytometers have massive statistical power due to their single cell resolution and high throughput, they produce no information about cell morphology or spatial resolution offered by microscopy, which is a much wanted feature missing in almost all flow cytometers.

Ultra-High Resolution Multi-Platform Heterodyne Optical Imaging

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a new technique for achieving ultra-high resolution heterodyne synthetic imaging across multiple platforms (e.g. multiple satellites) using optical frequency comb sources.

Transabdominal Fetal Blood Oximetry

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method and apparatus for clinical-grade transabdominal fetal blood oximetry.

Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Sensors for Probing the Action of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor toolbox for the probing of G-protein coupled receptors.

Novel Applicator Using FTA Paper to Collect Touch DNA

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a novel approach to an applicator designed to expedite and increase the efficiency of the DNA collection process at crime scenes.

Resolution Enhancement Method For Mm-Wave/Terahertz Imaging

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an imaging method based on low-cost CMOS process technologies showing enhanced resolution as high as 1.4THz.

Apparatus And Method For Optically Amplified Multi-Dimensional Spectrally Encoded Imaging

Scientists at UCLA have developed an advanced optical imaging technique that uses spectral brushes to capture image data across an entire sample area at once, a technique that enables faster imaging and higher sensitivity over current methods.

Novel Contrast Enhancement for Detection of Amyloid Beta Peptides using MRI, EPR, PET, and ESRM

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed nitroxide-coupled amyloid agents to produce contrast enhancement for amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) detection using MRI, EPR, PET, and ESRM.

Multiple in vivo tissue chromophores

The field of the invention generally relates to methods and devices used in diffuse optical spectroscopy. More specifically, the field of the invention generally relates to broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy methods and devices which are able to dynamically monitor multiple in vivo tissue chromophores. A device and method utilizes a broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) system to dynamically calculate the concentrations of multiple chromophores in vivo using a non-invasive probe. The device and method permit dynamic monitoring of multiple in vivo tissue chromophores non-invasively with sensitivities necessary for effective therapeutic monitoring. The device includes a probe containing first and second source optical fibers as well as first and second detector optical fibers. The probe is placed adjacent to a sample of interest and detects reflected light which is passed to a proximally located detector and spectrometer. The concentrations of multiple chromophores are determined in real time. In a preferred embodiment, the multiple tissue chromophores include at least two of methemoglobin (MetHb), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb-R), oxyhemoglobin (Hb-O2), water (H2O), and methylene blue (MB). The device and method can be used quantify and monitor methemoglobin formation in subjects suffering from methemoglobinemia.

SIMPLE AND RAPID METHOD FOR QUANTIFICATION OF HALOGINATED DISACCHARIDES, SUCH AS SUCRALOSE, IN AQUEOUS MEDIA

Sucralose has become widely used as an artificial sweetener due in large part that it has low caloric content and is 600 times sweeter than table sugar (sucrose). Due to its resistance to metabolic degradation, sucralose can also be used as a marker for noninvasively assessing gastrointestinal small intestine or colonic permeability. This urinary marker is traditionally analyzed by time consuming and expensive methods, such as high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry or evaporative light scatter as the detectors. We have developed an alternative methodology of using a chemical-fluorescent technique for rapid analysis of halogenated disaccharides, such as sucralose.

External Cavity Laser Based Upon Metasurfaces

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel approach for terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade (QC) lasers to achieve scalable output power, high quality diffraction limited, and directive output beams.

An Integrated Microfluidic Platform For Selective Extraction Of Single-Cell mRNA

The invention is a high-density, single-cell trapping array. A specialized probe tip can be precisely manipulated to non-destructively collect targeted intracellular material from the trapped cells for measurements. Due to the non-destructive nature of the invention, the integrity and function of the trapped cells can be preserved and they can be monitored over time to better understand disease processes.

A Method For Accurate Parametric Mapping Based On Characterization Of A Reference Tissue Or Region

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiological Sciences have developed a method to address the issue of B1+ field inhomogeneity that is becoming a persistent problem in higher field strengths. 

Individual Identity Verified Through Device-Free, WiFi Based Framework

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a device-free, WiFi based framework that can isolate individual identity, from a small group of users, simply by observing variations in WiFi signals through a user’s gait.

Direct Optical Visualization Of Graphene On Transparent Substrates

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Nuclear Magnetic Resonance System for Determining Oil and Water Compositions in Drilling Mud

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system and method for determining oil and water compositions in drilling mud.

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