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Patterning Silica Islands Onto Thermoplastic Shrink Film

Biosensors have a variety of applications from glucose monitoring to drug discovery. The ability to detect low concentration of analytes in biological samples is important for creating effective biosensors. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel lithographic method for capturing, concentrating, and identifying biological agents.

Controllable Emulsification And Point-Of-Care Assays Driven By Magnetic Induced Movement Of The Fluid

UCLA researchers in the department of Bioengineering have developed a novel microfluidic droplet generation technique, where instead of pumps, only magnetic force is used for controllable emulsification of ferrofluid containing solutions. 

Highly Wrinkled Metal Thin Films Using Lift-Off Layers

Wearable electronics are becoming a popular way of integrating personal healthcare with continuous, remote health monitoring, yet current devices are bulky and exhibit poor electronic performance. Wrinkled metal thin films can be utilized for their thin, flexible profiles, which conform well to the skin. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel method using specialized materials that results in wrinkled metal thin films that have enhanced mechanical and electrical performance.

A Protein Domain That Protects Ubiquitinated Forms Of Proteins From Degradation In Cis And In Trans

Ubiquitylation affects proteins in many ways, such as activation or inactivation, and signaling for their degradation. It is not fully understood how ubiquitin effects all proteins or how researchers may use it to control cellular processes. This invention describes novel fusion proteins that protect ubiquitylated forms of the target proteins from degradation.

Disposable Mouse Urine Collection Device

The ability to collect clean mouse urine in sufficient quantities for metabolic studies has been difficult to achieve due to the small volumes collected and the resulting contamination with feces with urine, especially when it is necessary to collect samples over of period of 24 hours. The cages currently available for this purpose are cumbersome, expensive, and complex and they often do not provide clean collections and the mouse urine is subject to evaporation within 24 hours, thus leaving a very small volume and inaccurate total volumes. Another potential issue with the current collection cages is their stability, especially during movement from one mouse room to another or from one vivarium to another. Also, the cages do not hold up to repeated washings, which can lead to potential contamination. Alternatively, simple procedures to collect mouse urine by placing mice on a plastic wrap are often not consistent and dependent on the lab handler.

Combined Optical Micromanipulation & Interferometric Topography

Background: Optical tweezers (OTs) is a commonly used light-based technology with a broad range of applications in studying mechanobiology. While OTs are capable of making force measurements at the pico-Newton level, they cannot be used to provide size and structural information on the object being investigated. The platform technology developed at UCR provides simultaneous measurements of force and physical dimensions. Currently, many leading manufacturers for nanoanalytic instruments are expanding their operations in North America and Asia to support the growth of its application in the scientific community.   Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed COMMIT, an all-optical platform, by combining optical tweezers and a novel microscopy method. COMMIT allows for simultaneous measurement of nano-sized objects and pN forces. Existing methods call for fluorescent labels and lack high resolution in imaging. This platform facilitates dynamic measurement of transient nanomechanical properties of cells in real-time.

Technology For Sustaining Pluripotency And Improved Growth Of Stem Cells In Culture

Background: Pluripotent stem cells (PSC) have tremendous potential in regenerative medicine, cell therapy, and drug/toxicant screening, and can increase our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of disease. The stem cell industry has accelerated annual growth projections of 20% by 2020. Overall, there is growing demand for culture media that can support rapid growth, survival, and sustain pluripotency of stem cells. Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed a novel, non-toxic biological compound that can be added to any culture medium to prevent unwanted differentiation. Compared to the standard commercial media currently used in PSC laboratories, this compound produces major improvements in cell quality, cell growth and maintenance of pluripotency during repeated passaging. Additionally, regulatory groups categorize stem cell therapy as an orphan drug, thereby allowing accelerated approval.

Method To Probe Bulk And Surface States In Thermoelectrics And Topological Materials

Researchers in the department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA have developed a non-invasive, site-specific method to probe the electronic structure of both surface and bulk states within thermoelectric and topological insulator materials.

Diagnostic Colorimetric Assay

0 0 1 183 1047 UC Berkeley 8 2 1228 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} Hyper-accumulation of copper in biological fluids and tissues is a hallmark of pathologies such as Wilson’s and Menkes diseases, various neurodegenerative diseases, and toxic environmental exposure. Diseases characterized by copper hyper accumulation are currently challenging to identify due to costly diagnostic tools that involve extensive technical workup.   To solve these problems, UC Berkeley researches developed a simple yet highly selective and sensitive diagnostic tool along with new materials that can enable monitoring of copper levels in biological fluid samples without complex and expensive instrumentation.  The diagnostic tool includes a robust three-dimensional porous aromatic framework (PAF) densely functionalized with thioether groups for selective capture and concentration of copper from biofluids as well as aqueous samples.  The PAF exhibits high selectivity for copper over other biologically relevant metals, with a saturation capacity reaching over 600 mg/g.  The researchers were able to use the diagnostic tool, which included a colorimetric indicator, to identify aberrant elevations of copper in urine samples from mice with Wilson’s disease and also traced exogenously added copper in serum. 

Optical Phase Retrieval Systems Using Color-Multiplexed Illumination

Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and phase. Our eyes and cameras, however, only see real values (i.e. intensity), so cannot measure phase directly. Phase is important, especially in biological imaging, where cells are typically transparent (i.e. invisible) but yet impose phase delays. When we can measure the phase delays, we get back important shape and density maps.   Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a new method for recovering both phase and amplitude of an arbitrary sample in an optical microscope from a single image, using patterned partially coherent illumination. The hardware requirements are compatible with most modern microscopes via a simple condenser insert, or by replacing the entire illumination pathway with a programmable LED array, providing flexibility, portability, and affordability, while eliminating many of the trade-offs required by other methods. This enables quantitative imaging of phase from a single image, using partially coherent illumination, and in a way that is flexible and amenable to a variety of existing microscopy systems. 

System and Methods to Track Single Molecules

Tracking single molecules inside cells reveals the dynamics of biological processes, including receptor trafficking, signaling and cargo transport. However, individual molecules often cannot be resolved inside cells due to their high density in the cellular environment, plus it is difficult to see spatial and temporal features, such as signal transduction events at the cell surface or on intracellular compartments, with single molecule resolution. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed the PhotoGate device and methods in order to control the number of fluorescent particles in a region of interest. By deploying PhotoGate and applying patterned photobleaching, they have demonstrated the tracking of single particles at surface densities two orders of magnitude higher than the single-molecule detection limit. Additional experimentation enabled the observation of ligand-induced dimerization of epidermal growth factor receptors on a live cell membrane, and also measurements of the binding and the dissociation rate of single adaptor protein from early endosomes in the crowded environment of the cytoplasm. The innovative approach enables tracking of single particles at high spatial and temporal resolution, and for mapping of molecular trajectories, as well as determining complex stoichiometry and dynamics, and drives the art towards video-rate imaging of live cells with molecular (1–5 nm) resolution.

Miniature Cleaning Device and Method for Ion Traps

For decades, quantum mechanics have been studied as a powerful new resource to accelerate and safeguard critical computational processes. A trapped ion quantum computer is one proposed approach, where qubit states based on trapped ions are connected through a common network of electromagnetic fields, gates and algorithms. One problem pertains to electric field noise arising from system electrodes which can destroy the stored quantum information. Specialized instruments, such as ion guns, are commonly used to treat unwanted electric field noise, but these devices require bulky port hardware and often cause undesirable and irreversible damage to surfaces. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have researched alternatives to traditional ion gun means. They have developed an innovative cleaning method and apparatus which is nonobstructing, and has greater directionality and overall control. The researchers have demonstrated the ultra-small (footprint = 2cm) and platform-friendly cleaning system for quantum information processing chips, in prototype stage.

A New Methodology For 3D Nanoprinting

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a novel protocol to enable 3D printing with nanometer precision in all three dimensions using polyelectrolyte (PE) inks and atomic force microscopy.

Atom Probe Tomography Method and Algorithm

Most cluster analysis parameters in atom probe tomography (APT) are selected ad hoc. This can often lead to data misinterpretation and misleading results by instrument technicians and researchers. Moreover, arbitrary cluster parameters can have suboptimal consequences on data quality and integrity, leading to inefficiencies for downstream data users. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a framework and specific cluster analysis methods to efficiently extract knowledge from better APT data. By using parameter selection protocols with theoretical explanations, this technology allows for a more optimized and robust multivariate statistical analysis technique from the start, thus improving the quality of analysis and outcomes for both upstream and downstream data users.

Rapid Methods for Multi-layer Microfluidic Structures

Microfluidics has rapidly advanced in the fields of chemical and biological research since 1980s due to its unique ability to make low-cost, high-throughput platforms. The most far-reaching breakthrough in microfluidics has been the development of soft-lithography using rigid micromachined molds to shape elastomeric polymers. Among polymeric materials, Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is commonly used due to its numerous ideal properties, including its ease in manufacturing, reasonable cost, as well as strength, transparency, and especially biocompatibility. However, traditional PDMS methods for fabricating microfluidic devices have a unique set of challenges, including long and expensive process times, and feature sophistication limits (e.g. restricted to rectilinear features). To address these challenges, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed novel 3D printing techniques for fully-integrated, multi-layer microfluidic objects to achieve greater system-level functionalities. For demonstration, UC researchers created complex, high-quality geometries in PDMS without the need for a microscope, including thin membranes and rounded channels and while accounting for surface roughness. Their novel processes could enable assembly of microfluidic components into sophisticated 3D architectures, which may provide a new platform for rapidly creating complex microfluidic devices in volume.

Sleep Circuit Neurons

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a distinct brain state characterized by activated electroencephalogram and complete skeletal muscle paralysis, and is associated with vivid dreams. The medulla contains neurons that are active during REM sleep, but whether they play a causal role in REM sleep generation was unclear.   UC Berkelely researchers have discovered that a GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric-acid-releasing) pathway originating from the ventral medulla powerfully promotes REM sleep.  The researchers inserted am optogenetic switch into the ventral medulla of mice and the GABAergic neurons rapidly and reliably initiated REM sleep episodes and prolonged their durations, whereas inactivating these neurons had the opposite effects.  The researcheres showed these neurons triggered all aspects of REM sleep, including muscle paralysis and the typical cortical activation that makes the brain look more awake than in non-REM sleep.  

Pyrite Shrink-Wrap Laminate As A Hydroxyl Radical Generator

The invention is a diagnostic technology, as well as a research and development tool. It is a simple, easy to operate, and effective platform for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and biological species. Specifically, this platform generates hydroxyl radicals for oxidative footprinting – a technique commonly employed in protein mapping and analysis. The platform itself is inexpenisve to fabricate, scalable, and requires nothing more than an ordinary pipet to use. In addition, it is highly amenable to scale-up, multiplexing, and automation, and so it holds promise as a high-throughput method for mapping protein structure in support of product development, validation, and regulatory approval in the protein-based therapeutics industry.

An Integrated Microfluidic Platform For Size-Selective Single-Cell Trapping

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a fully integrated microfluidic platform that is configured to separate and isolate single cells. The invention uses hydrodynamic filtration to isolate targeted cells of various sizes. Once the single cells are isolated and sorted, they can be studied individually in a purer state free from other contaminating or unwanted cells. The system does not use biochemical “labels” to identify target cells. It is a label-free separation technique.

An Optical System for Parallel Acquisition of Raman Spectra from a 2-Dimensional Laser Beam Array

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method for acquiring Raman spectra from a plurality of laser interrogation spots in a two-dimensional array. This method can be used for parallel analysis of individual cells or for fast chemical imaging of specimens.

Ferromagnetic Infused Microstructure Arrays For Cell Sorting And Method Of Their Fabrication

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have invented a system for biological cell sorting using ferromagnetic infused microstructure arrays. The invented system is an adherent cell sorting platform with individually addressable growth substrates for specified cell release and collection using integrated magnetic structures. Some previous cell sorting methods have sacrificed the image clarity of the samples that they have sorted due to the process by which they sort cells. The invented micro array platform allows for the capture of individual components while also maintaining ideal imaging conditions.

Novel Auditory Diagnostic

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have developed a novel diagnostic for the auditory system.

Novel Hydrogel for Optimized Cell Delivery, Culture and Inflammation Prevention from De-cellularized Human Amniotic Membrane

A novel, human amnion derived hydrogel has been shown to considerably optimize cell delivery and scaffolding by increasing cellular survival, proliferation, and integration, as well as significantly decreasing host rejection and morbidity.

Patient-Specific Ct Scan-Based Finite Element Modeling (FEM) Of Bone

This invention is a software for calculating the maximum force a bone can support. The offered method provides an accurate assessment of how changes in a bone due to special circumstances, such as osteoporosis or a long duration space flight, might increase patient’s risk of fracture.

A Method For Determining Characteristic Planes And Axes Of Bones And Other Body Parts, And Application To Registration Of Data Sets

The invention is a method for deriving an anatomical coordinate system for a body part (especially bone) to aid in its characterization. The method relies on 3-D digital images of an anatomical object, such as CT- or MR-scans, to objectively, precisely, and reliably identify its geometry in a computationally efficient manner. The invention is a great improvement over the current practice of subjective, user-dependent manual data entry and visualization of bones and organs. The applications for well-defined anatomical coordinate systems include robotic surgeries, models for bone density studies, and construction of statistical anatomical data sets.

Manufacturing of Tungsten Scandate Nano-Composite Powder via Sol-Gel Method for High Current Density and Long-Life Cathodes

The researchers at University of California, Davis have developed a new process for manufacturing tungsten scandate nano-composite powder that produces high current density and long-life cathodes for high-power terahertz vacuum electron devices. Scandate tungsten nano-composite cathodes enable advancement of microwave sources that bridge the "Terahertz gap."

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