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Alpha1–2-Fucosyltransferase for Enzymatic Synthesis of Alpha1–2-linked Fucosylated Glycans

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered an alpha1–2-fucosyltransferase that efficiently catalyzes the synthesis of alpha1–2-linked fucosylated glycans that can contain different internal glycans.

Solvothermal Growth of Single Crystals Using a Single Control Temperature

A method by which an experimenter can control the supersaturation for crystal growth. 

Group-III Containing Source Material For Bulk Nitride Solution Growth

A method for producing low-cost Group-III source materials.

Metal-free affinity media/agents for the selective capture of histidine-rich peptide sequences

The present invention utilizes metal-free synthetic polymer-based materials for the purification of peptides and proteins containing or being fused with histidine-rich sequences, which does not damage the function of the target protein and is less costly.

Next-generation broad-spectrum anti-cancer Rad51 inhibitors

This invention describes the design, synthesis and successful evaluation of a panel of novel Rad51 inhibitors to treat a broad spectrum of cancer types.

PharmaCoLogic: Preclinical Cardiac Drug Screening

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed PharmaCoLogic: a computer based preclinical screening model to predict the effects of developmental drugs and drug induced cardiotoxicity.

Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Sensors for Probing the Action of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor toolbox for the probing of G-protein coupled receptors.

Culturing More Mature iPSC-derived Cardiac Myocytes

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a non-genetic, non-pharmacological method for culturing more mature induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes.

A Synthetic Peptide for Use in Diagnosis and Treatment of Myasthenia Gravis

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a peptide that could be used in the diagnosis and treatment of Myasthenia Gravis.

DNA Amplification by Electric Field Cycling (efc-PCR)

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a popular technique for amplifying and quantifying minute quantities of DNA. Technologies based on PCR are used for a wide range of applications, including forensics, disease detection, and laboratory tools. Researchers at UCI have developed a device that can implement a novel method for PCR based on voltage cycling as opposed to temperature cycling (the current method for PCR). This allows the device to be much more portable and compact than those currently available.

Stimuli Responsive Immunostimulants

An immune response typically occurs during inflammation, auto-immune diseases, or cancers. In such cases, chemical triggers, or immunostimulants, recognized by receptor proteins at cell membranes activate the immune cells. Researchers can use these immunostimulants to test how different cell subsets contribute to immune response mechanisms. This invention describes a novel type of immunostimulant that can be toggled on and off, both inside the body and in vitro.

Ligands for Improved Angiogenesis and Endothelialization of Blood Contacting Devices

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered novel targeting ligands that can specifically bind and capture endothelial cells and endothelial progenitors for improved endothelialization and angiogenesis of medical devices and scaffolds.

Novel Solid Tumor Chemodrug LLS2

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a new library of small molecule LLS2 that can kill a variety of cancer cells

New Method to Increase the Rate of Protein Ligation Catalyzed by the S. Aureus Sortase A Enzyme

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a new method to increase the rate of ligation catalyzed by the S. aureus Sortase A enzyme

Wireless Wearable Big Data Brain Machine Interface (W2b2/Wwbb)

UCLA researchers have developed a wireless wearable big data brain machine interface. This technology provides a user-friendly brain machine interface system that can monitor/record a large amount of brain activities and transfer, wirelessly, the processed/raw data to a remote mobile unit.

Novel Multi-Target Inhibitors Could Be Applied for Pain Treatment

Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase (sEH) and Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) inhibition have been independently developed as a pharmaceutical targets for treating inflammatory and neuropathic pain. There is evidence that concurrent inhibition of these two targets is synergistic and combining both targets into a single therapeutic approach may provide better relief for patients. Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed compounds that concurrently inhibit sEH and FAAH to be used as novel therapeutics for treating pain and as experimental tools.

Dual Targeting Agents For Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder affecting 10% of people over age 65. It is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive function and memory impairments that are associated with increased peptide and protein aggregation in the brain. The invention herein describes a novel therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease which would promote the removal of toxic Amyloid-beta peptides out of the brain.

Multiple in vivo tissue chromophores

The field of the invention generally relates to methods and devices used in diffuse optical spectroscopy. More specifically, the field of the invention generally relates to broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy methods and devices which are able to dynamically monitor multiple in vivo tissue chromophores. A device and method utilizes a broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) system to dynamically calculate the concentrations of multiple chromophores in vivo using a non-invasive probe. The device and method permit dynamic monitoring of multiple in vivo tissue chromophores non-invasively with sensitivities necessary for effective therapeutic monitoring. The device includes a probe containing first and second source optical fibers as well as first and second detector optical fibers. The probe is placed adjacent to a sample of interest and detects reflected light which is passed to a proximally located detector and spectrometer. The concentrations of multiple chromophores are determined in real time. In a preferred embodiment, the multiple tissue chromophores include at least two of methemoglobin (MetHb), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb-R), oxyhemoglobin (Hb-O2), water (H2O), and methylene blue (MB). The device and method can be used quantify and monitor methemoglobin formation in subjects suffering from methemoglobinemia.

microfluidic device for preparation of monodisperse microcapsules and microvesicles

Many applications, ranging from in vivo cell culture growth to drug delivery, rely on microcapsules to encapsulate and protect cells or molecules until their desired release. These microcapsules are typically generated in immiscible fluid, which must be depleted before they can be effectively used. Researchers at UCI have recently developed a paper-based microcapsule extraction technique that is quicker, cheaper, and less damaging than conventional methods.

Identification Of A Factor That Promotes Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal

The Mikkola group at UCLA has discovered a novel regulator of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. The overexpression of this regulator increases the yield of ex vivo stem cell expansion and could thereby improve the efficiency of stem cell therapies. 

CARDIAC TISSUE MODELS AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Tissue engineering approaches have the potential to increase the physiologic relevance of human iPS-derived cells, such as cardiomyocytes (iPS-CM). However, forming Engineered Heart Muscle (EHM) typically requires >1 million cells per tissue. Existing miniaturization strategies involve complex approaches not amenable to mass production, limiting the ability to use EHM for iPS-based disease modeling and drug screening. Micro-scale cardiospheres are easily produced, but do not facilitate assembly of elongated muscle or direct force measurements.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed a 3D filamentous fiber matrix that combines features of EHM and cardiospheres: Micro-Heart Muscle (μHM) arrays, in which elongated muscle fibers are formed in an easily fabricated template, with as few as 2,000 iPS-CM per individual tissue. Within μHM, iPS-CM exhibit uniaxial contractility and alignment, robust sarcomere assembly, and reduced variability and hypersensitivity in drug responsiveness, compared to monolayers with the same cellular composition. μHM mounted onto standard force measurement apparatus exhibited a robust Frank-Starling response to external stretch, and a dose-dependent inotropic response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol.  

Enhanced Method of Geomasking Builds Upon Donut Method Using Demographic Information

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an enhanced geomasking method building upon the current “Donut Method” which considers demographic information when masking medical-related geographic data. In doing this, greater medical validity is preserved and greater research utility is acquired, all without substantial loss in anonymity.

Building blocks for 3D, modular microfluidics

Researchers at the University of CA, Irvine have developed modular microfluidic platforms consisting of microfluidic building blocks that can be connected in various configurations to construct complete microfluidic devices for different applications.

An Integrated Microfluidic Platform For Selective Extraction Of Single-Cell mRNA

The invention is a high-density, single-cell trapping array. A specialized probe tip can be precisely manipulated to non-destructively collect targeted intracellular material from the trapped cells for measurements. Due to the non-destructive nature of the invention, the integrity and function of the trapped cells can be preserved and they can be monitored over time to better understand disease processes.

Compositions and Methods using RNA Splicing Modulation to Selectively Impair Leukemic Cancer Stem Cells

The advancing age of the US population and increasing exposure to chemotherapy (for other malignancies) has resulted in increased rates of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Following on the heels of MDS is progression to therapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is predicted to rise significantly over the next few decades.  The heterogeneity of molecular abnormalities in therapy-resistant secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) combined with a paucity of effective treatment options has resulted in high relapse-related mortality rates. In addition to approved therapies, many experimental agents also target epigenetic regulators of gene expression in clinical trials for sAML. However, most of these agents fail to improve patient survival, suggesting that epigenetic modifier therapies may reduce leukemic burden but may not effectively target a subpopulation of therapy-resistant leukemia stem cells that drive relapse. Hence, there is a critical need for developing clinical candidates with different modes of action. Recent studies implicate the spliceosome as a therapeutic vulnerability in solid tumors.

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