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Treatment Of Inherited Retinal Disease

Researchers at UCI have developed a method of treating inherited retinal diseases, such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa, by gene therapy of the RPE65 nonsense mutation. This method uses base editor-mediated genome-editing by viral delivery and lead to improved patient treatment through enhanced editing of single base pairs and reduced off-target genomic editing.

Seamless Ceramics for Biomedical Applications

Prof. Guillermo Aguilar-Mendoza and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside (UCR) and Prof. Javier Garay and his colleagues from the University of California, San Diego have developed an all ceramic, biocompatible, hermetically sealed package for encapsulating electronics. This technology uses disparate transparent polycrystalline ceramics and is sealed by laser.  The laser directly joins the disparate surfaces, protecting the electronic device from damage while ensuring a high-quality seal. This state-of-the-art technology provides  superior packaging for biomedical implant devices that has long-term biocompatibility. It also provides safe and leak-proof seals. Fig 1: Picture of transparent ceramics fabricated at UCR.

CRISPR-CAS EFFECTOR POLYPEPTIDES AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF (“Cas-VariPhi”)

CRISPR-Cas systems include Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a guide RNA(s), which includes a segment that binds Cas proteins and a segment that binds to a target nucleic acid. For example, Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems comprise a single Cas protein bound to a guide RNA, where the Cas protein binds to and cleaves a targeted nucleic acid. The programmable nature of these systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology for use in modification of target nucleic acid.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a novel family of proteins (CasVariPhi) that utilize a guide RNA to perform RNA-directed cleavage of nucleic acids. Viral and microbial (cellular) genomes were assembled from a variety of environmental and animal microbiome sources, and variants of a novel and previously unknown Cas protein family were uncovered from the sequences decoded. 

CRISPR-CAS EFFECTOR POLYPEPTIDES AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF (“Cas-Omega”)

CRISPR-Cas systems include Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a guide RNA(s), which includes a segment that binds Cas proteins and a segment that binds to a target nucleic acid. For example, Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems comprise a single Cas protein bound to a guide RNA, where the Cas protein binds to and cleaves a targeted nucleic acid. The programmable nature of these systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology for use in modification of target nucleic acid.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a novel family of proteins (CasOmega) that utilize a guide RNA to perform RNA-directed cleavage of nucleic acids. Viral and microbial (cellular) genomes were assembled from a variety of environmental and animal microbiome sources, and variants of a novel and previously unknown Cas protein family were uncovered from the sequences decoded. 

CRISPR-CAS EFFECTOR POLYPEPTIDES AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF (“Cas-Theta”)

CRISPR-Cas systems include Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a guide RNA(s), which includes a segment that binds Cas proteins and a segment that binds to a target nucleic acid. For example, Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems comprise a single Cas protein bound to a guide RNA, where the Cas protein binds to and cleaves a targeted nucleic acid. The programmable nature of these systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology for use in modification of target nucleic acid.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a novel family of proteins (CasTheta) that utilize a guide RNA to perform RNA-directed cleavage of nucleic acids. Viral and microbial (cellular) genomes were assembled from a variety of environmental and animal microbiome sources, and variants of a novel and previously unknown Cas protein family were uncovered from the sequences decoded. 

CRISPR-CAS EFFECTOR POLYPEPTIDES AND METHODS OF USE THEREOF (CasGamma)

CRISPR-Cas systems include Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a guide RNA(s), which includes a segment that binds Cas proteins and a segment that binds to a target nucleic acid. For example, Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems comprise a single Cas protein bound to a guide RNA, where the Cas protein binds to and cleaves a targeted nucleic acid. The programmable nature of these systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology for use in modification of target nucleic acid.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a novel family of compact proteins (CasGamma) with a RuvC-like domain in the C-terminal end of the protein. These proteins are able to cleave nucleic acids. Viral and microbial (cellular) genomes were assembled from a variety of environmental and animal microbiome sources, and variants of a novel and previously unknown Cas protein family were uncovered from the sequences decoded. These CasGamma proteins utilize a guide RNA to perform RNA-directed cleavage of nucleic acids.  

Method For Mid-Infrared Imaging In Si-Based Cameras Through Non-Degenerate Two-Photon Absorption

Researchers at UCI have developed a novel method to combine common CCD (charge-coupled device) cameras with mid-infrared (MIR) technology in order to create an affordable and accessible spectroscopic camera for biochemical imaging.