Available Technologies

No technologies match these criteria.
Schedule UC TechAlerts to receive an email when technologies are published that match this search. Click on the Save Search link above

Find technologies available for licensing from all ten University of California (UC) campuses.

Autonomous Comfort Systems Via An Infrared-Fused Vision-Driven Robotic Systems

Robotic comfort systems have been developed which use fans to deliver heated/cooling air to building occupants to provide greater levels of personal comfort.  However, current robotic systems rely on surveys asking individuals about their comfort state through a web interface or app.  This reliance on user feedback becomes impractical due to survey fatigue on the part of the user.  Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a system which uses a visible light camera located on the nozzle of a robotic fan to detect human facial features (e.g., eyes, nose, and lips).  Images from a co-located thermal camera are then registered onto the visible light image and temperatures of different facial features are captured and used to infer the comfort state of the individual.  Accordingly, the fan/heater system blows air with a specific velocity and temperature toward the occupant via a closed-loop feedback control.  Since the system can track a person in an environment, it addresses issues with prior data collection systems that needed occupants to be positioned in a specific location.

Chronic Wound Mouse Model

Prof. Manuela Martins-Green and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a mouse model for chronic wounds in db/db-/- diabetic mice. Wounds are considered chronic when the body is unable to properly facilitate every stage of the healing process due to Oxidative Stress (OS), which occurs when an imbalance of redox chemicals exists in the damaged tissues. To create the chronic  wounds the mice were treated with inhibitors of antioxidant enzymes (IAE) at the time of wounding only. The wounds were then covered with tegaderm membranes and allowed to become chronic. Control wounds were treated with placebo. Fig 1: Percent open wound area over time in wounds of C57BL/6 and db/db-/- mice.  

High Resolution Laser Speckle Imaging of Blood Flow

Prof. Guillermo Aguilar and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a new approach to laser speckle imaging, called Laser Speckle Optical Flow Imaging (LSOFI) to be used for autonomous blood vessel detection and as a qualitative tool for blood flow visualization. LSOFI works by capturing the speckle displacement caused by different physical behavior and use the data to create a mapped image. It has been shown that LSOFI has many advantages over LSCI methods both in temporal and spatial resolution. Namely, LSOFI can be used to produce higher resolution images compared with the LSCI method using less frames. Combining this technology with Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computation increases the speed of LSOFI, so GPU enabled LSOFI shows potential to create a fast and fully functional quasi-real time blood flow imaging system.  Fig 1: Comparison of blood flow imaging techniques applied to the raw image. The shown results are for Laser Speckle Optical Flow Imaging (LSOFI) using the Farneback Optical Flow algorithm, traditional Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI), and Temporal Frame Averaging (sLASCA).  

Enhanced Block Copolymer Self-Assembly

Brief description not available

Vehicle Make and Model Identification

Prof. Bir Bhanu and his colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a method for  analyzing real-time video feed of vehicles from a rear  view  perspective to identify the make and model of a vehicle. This method works by using a software system for detecting the Regions-of-Interest (ROIs) of moving vehicles and moving shadows, computing structural and other features and using a vehicle make and model database for vehicle identification. The system performs calculations based on factors found in all vehicles, so it is reliable regardless of vehicle color and type. The system is compatible with low resolution video feed, so it is able to analyze video feed in real-time. Thus, this technology holds potential for innovating fields like vehicle surveillance, vehicle security, class-based vehicle tolling, and traffic monitoring where reliable real-time video analysis is needed.  Figure 1: Example of the direct rear view of moving vehicles.  

Automated Biomarker Prediction Using Optical Coherence Tomography

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computational Medicine have developed a computer program capable of automatically and accurately diagnosing optical diseases using OCT.