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Switchable Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered Human Natural Killer Cells

The existing CAR-engineered T cell-based (CAR-T) therapy represents one of the most successful immunotherapy approaches developed in recent years. Most CAR-T cell therapy has been used clinically to treat hematological malignancies by targeting the B cell-specific antigen, CD19. However, this approach is not without limitations due to toxicities such as by neurotoxicity or cytokine release syndrome. Additionally, CAR-T cells function only as autologous cells due to graft-versus-host disease that would develop if cells were obtained from another person. Therefore, CAR-T cells must be produced on a patient-specific basis. NK cells, on the other hand, function as allogenic cytotoxic effector cells that do not have to be utilized on a patient-specific basis and are proven to be less toxic since they do not cause cytokine release syndrome, neurotoxicity, or graft-versus-host disease. For these reasons, CAR-engineered NK (CAR-NK) cells have increasingly attracted interest as an alternative CAR-cell therapy. However, there exist other unmet challenges. Targeting CAR-based therapies against solid tumors has been challenging due to the lack of truly tumor-specific antigens as most targets are shared by non-malignant cells and can cause toxicity due to “on-target, off-tumor” effects.” A fine-tunable CAR therapy is useful to better identify and target tumors while limiting this toxicity.

Techniques for Improving Positron Emission Tomography Image Quality and Tracking Real-Time Biological Processes

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed methodologies that perform dynamic PET imaging and provide opportunities for tracing blood flow and other biological systems in real-time.

Improved Highly Potent Specific Human Kunitz Inhibitor of Fibrinolytic Enzyme Plasmin

UCLA researchers in the School of Medicine have developed mutant polypeptides of the tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) Kunitz domain 1 (KD1), which can serve as potent inhibitors of fibrinolysis.

Continuous, Quantitative, Selective, Non-Enzymatic Glucose Monitoring Using Conductimetric Analysis

A new molecule that enables glucose monitoring using measurements of solution conductivity. 

Method for the detection of specific cells in bodily fluids with a small fluorescent probe

Using standard cellular biology techniques, researchers at UCI have developed a method for detecting the cellular components of blood easily, cheaply, and quickly with accurate quantification using fluorescence techniques.

Methods of Modifying T Cells Using Runx Family Transcription Factors

Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediate immunity to intracellular infections and tumors by directly killing infected or aberrant cells by delivering pro-apoptotic granzyme proteases into the cytoplasm of target cells via the pore-forming protein Perforin. During an immune response, stimulation of T cell antigen receptors (TCR) on antigen-specific naive CD8+ T cells initiates their exponential accumulation and differentiation into cells that upregulate Perforin and granzymes. Near the peak response, most responding cells in the circulation comprise terminal effector (TE) CTL, but these cells have short half-lives after the acute immune challenge is resolved. A smaller fraction comprises memory precursor (MP) effector CTL that efficiently give rise to long-lived memory CTL, which reside in lymphoid tissue as TCN and that provide a stem cell-like memory reservoir that regenerates immune responses upon re-challenge.. In addition, a fraction of CTL differentiate into cells that depart the general circulation and lodge in non-lymphoid tissues where they persist long-term as TRM (tissue-resident memory) and provide immediate protection in situ at the surfaces where infections and solid tumors originate. Until now, the molecules and mechanisms that remodel chromatin structure and transcriptional programs that drive activated CD8+ T cells to differentiate into TCM (central memory) and TRM (tissue-resident memory ) CTL, and ensure they do not "skew" into TE CTL which do not persist, were virtually unknown.

A High Throughput Biochemical Fluorometric Method For Measuring HDL Redox Activity

UCLA researchers in the Department of Medicine have developed a method of screening for the functional properties of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the blood that may serve as a more accurate risk indicator of cardiovascular disease.

Immunoassay For Human Erythroferrone

UCLA researchers from the Department of Medicine have developed a novel immunoassay for human erythroferrone.

Motion-Stabilized Flow Imaging Device

UC Irvine researchers developed a portable, handheld device for dynamically measuring and visualizing blood flow.

Targeting Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-Sigma to Augment Hematopoietic Reconstitution

UCLA researchers from the Department of Medicine have developed a novel technique for inducing increased hematopoietic recovery after HSC transplantation by targeting the protein tyrosine phosphatase-sigma (PTP-sigma) pathway.

Inhibition of the Aggregation of Transthyretin by Specific Binding of Peptides to Aggregation-Driving Segments

UCLA researchers from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel process to inhibit amyloid aggregation of Transthyretin, which is associated with three debilitating disorders including senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA), Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathies (FAP), and Familial Amyloidotic Cardiomyopathies (FAC).

Single-Chain Bispecific Chimeric Antigen Receptor Targeting BCMA And CS1 For The Treatment Of Multiple Myeloma

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have developed a single-chain bispecific chimeric antigen receptor targeting BCMA and CS1 for treating multiple myeloma.

High Throughput Digital Cell Quantification Of Immune Cell Subsets Via Epigenetic Markers

UCLA researchers in the Department of Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology have developed a novel high-throughput method for the quantification of immune cell subtype.

3D Scaffolds For Mesoderm Differentiation

Researchers led by Benjamin Wu from the Departments of Bioengineering and Pathology & Laboratory Medicine have developed an implantable scaffolding that can create hematopoietic stem cells from pluripotent stem cells in vivo.

Targeted Inhibition of Human Multiple Myeloma

UCLA researchers in the Department of Medicine have discovered a novel mechanism involving Eph receptor/ephrin ligand interaction, that regulates human multiple myeloma growth and repopulation in vivo.

Small Molecule Regulators of let-7 MicroRNA Targets in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cancer Stem Cells

UCLA researchers have identified a class of small molecule phosphodiesterase inhibitors that suppress let-7 target genes and inhibit cell growth in acute myeloid leukemia cancer cell lines.

A Combined Microfluidic and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging(FLIM) Platform to Identify Mammalian Circulating Cancer Cells in Whole Blood

Separating and classifying circulating cancer cells from whole blood using a single cell trap microfluidic platform coupled with label free fluorescence life time imaging.

A New Approach For Assessment Of Blood Coagulation

OCE (Optical Coherence Elastography) and ARF (Acoustic Radiation Force) for blood coagulation assessment. Diagnostic tool for assessing the clot formation/dissolution kinetics and strength.

Novel Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal Nanopillared Surface

Medical devices are susceptible to contamination by harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, which form biofilms on device surfaces. These biofilms are often resistant to antibiotics and other current treatments, resulting in over 2 million people per year suffering from diseases related to these contaminating microbes. Death rates for many of these diseases are high, often exceeding 50%. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel anti-bacterial and anti-fungal biocomposite that incorporates a nanopillared surface structure that can be applied as a coating to medical devices.

Sieve Container For Contactless Media Exchange For Cell Growth

Media that contains nutrients and growth factors is necessary to grow all types of cells, a process that is widely used in many fields of research. Such media should be routinely changed either to different media or a fresh batch of the same media. This change currently involves either using a pipette to transfer cells from their current dish of media to a new dish, or aspirating the media out of the dish and replacing it with new media. Both methods have inherent risks to stressing and damaging the cells. Researchers at UCI have developed a unique dish for growing cells that allows for safer aspiration of the old media, which reduces stress and damage to the cells.

Process For Sorting Dispersed Colloidal Structures

Researchers from the Chemistry and Biochemistry department at UCLA have developed method of separating and/or sorting specific target structures from other non-target structures in a complex mixture using custom-made target-specific colloidal particles.

Inhibition Of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase - Sigma For Hematopoietic Regeneration

UCLA Researchers have identified a novel pharmacological target for hematopoietic stem cell regeneration. They have developed small molecule inhibitors against the target and shown that the inhibitors cause rapid stem cell regeneration.

Microchambers With Solid-State Phosphorescent Sensor For Measuring Single Mitochondrial Respiration

The invention is a miniaturized device that assays the respiration of a single mitochondrion. Through a novel approach for measuring oxygen consumption rate, the device provides information on cell and tissue mitochondrial functional. This data is relevant for understanding human conditions associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as Alzheimer’s Disease and cancer.

Hybridoma Producing Antibodies To C1qRp

Individuals with genetic immunodeficiency, as well as patients with HIV, cancer, and those undergoing chemotherapy or high risk surgery, are at increased risk for infection. C1q, an important component of the immune system, is known to enhance phagocytosis (cell ingestion of harmful bacteria or other materials). Scientists at UCI have developed antibodies to the receptor for C1q, C1qRp, to be used as a target for prophylactic treatments in populations at high risk of infection.

Microfluidic In Situ Labelling On Stable Interfaces

A microfluidic device that utilizes acoustic streaming (Lateral Cavity Acoustic Transducer LCAT) to pump, sort, visualize and trap cells based on size and user specified characteristics. This device can process whole blood, and separate the blood constituents by size as well as integrate biomarkers and fluorescent tags to develop a powerful tool for early detection and diagnosis of diseases such as cancer.

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