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Diagnostic Marker for Chondrodystrophy and Intervertebral Disk Disease Susceptibility in Canines

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have developed a diagnostic method to identify dogs that are at risk for chondrodystrophy and/or intervertebral disc disease.

Portable waterborne pathogen detector

The inventors at the University of California, Irvine, have developed an automated, easy-to-use digital PCR system that can be used at the time of sample collection, making it highly effective in microbial pathogen analysis in resource-limited settings and extreme conditions.

Label Free Assessment Of Embryo Vitality

Researchers at UC Irvine developed an independent non-invasive method to distinguish between healthy and unhealthy embryos.

Low Cost Wireless Spirometer Using Acoustic Modulation

The present invention relates to portable Spirometry system that uses sound to transmit pulmonary airflow information to a receiver.

Microfluidic Component Package

The present invention describes a component package that enables a microfluidic device to be fixed to a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) or other substrate, and embedded within a larger microfluidic system.

Proteomic Chip for determining immune status and prognosis of HIV patients

Researchers at UCI have developed a multi-clade HIV-1 proteomic chip that helps with diagnosis of clade specific infection of HIV-1. Proteomic chip can determine the immune status and prognosis of HIV infected individuals.

Enhanced Cell/Bead Encapsulation Via Acoustic Focusing

The invention consists of a multi-channel, droplet-generating microfluidic device with a strategically placed feature. The feature vibrates in order to counteract particle-trapping micro-vortices formed in the device. Counteracting these vortices allows for single particle encapsulation in the droplets formed by the device and makes this technology a good candidate for use in single cell diagnostics and drug delivery systems.

Microfluidic Pressure Regulator For Robust Hydrogel Loading Without Bursting

This invention is aimed at controlling the pressure in 3D cell cultures. It consists of a combination of microfluidic channels, which surround the extracellular matrix (ECM), tunable pressure-regulated valves, which activate when a threshold pressure is reached in the ECM, and a repository, to direct excess gel away from the cell culture if the threshold pressure is exceeded. It can prevent leakage of gel between adjacent cell cultures in high-throughput arrays and is compatible with various cell culture materials and injection equipment.

Mobile Molecular Diagnostics System

There is a growing interest in point-of-care testing (POCT) where testing is done at or near the site of patient care, since POCT has a short therapeutic turnaround time, decreased process steps where errors can occur and only a small sample volume is required to perform a test.    UC Berkeley researchers have developed a mobile molecular diagnostics system that leverages efficient and dependable blood sampling, automated sample preparation, rapid optical detection of multi-analyte nucleic acids and proteins, and user-friendly systems integration with wireless communication.  The system includes a hand-held automated device with an adaptive sample control module, an optical signal transduction module, and an interface to a smartphone making this a reliable and field-applicable system for point-of-care and on-demand diagnostics. 

Optical Cavity PCR

Outbreaks of infectious diseases especially require diagnostic tools that can be used at the point-of-care (POC). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive and allows accurate diagnoses, but developing simple and robust PCR methods that can be used at POC remains a challenge. In particular, slow thermal cycling capability and high power consumption continue to be barriers.  Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed optical cavity PCR to address these challenges. This technology allows ultrafast cycling with low power consumption, high amplification efficiency and a simple fabrication process, enabling its use as a POC device. 

Automated Semen Analysis Using Holographic Imaging

UCLA researchers in the department of electrical engineering have developed a compact and lightweight platform for conducting automated semen analysis using a lens-free on-chip microscope.

Hemolysis-Free Blood Plasma Separation Device

Blood plasma separation is often the first step in blood-based clinical diagnostic procedures. Although centrifugation is the traditional method for blood plasma separation, it is time consuming, labor intensive, and therefore not suitable for point-of-care testing. Centrifugation can also lead to hemolysis (the rupture of red blood cells) which further results in plasma contamination and hinders effective protein and nucleic acid analysis in diagnostic testing. Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a simple and robust on-chip blood plasma separation device that addresses the problems found with traditional centrifugation. The novel hemolyis-free microfluidic blood plasma separation device reduced clogging of red blood cells (the hemoglobin concentration in the separated plasma was reduced about 90% compared to conventional devices), yet provided comparable target molecule recovery.

Fractal RF Coils for Use in High Field MRI (>3T) Resulting in High Resolution Images

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have designed a fractal shaped RF coil for magnetic resonance (MR) image acquisition that effectively reduces interference commonly associated with coil loops (such as the birdcage coil) that are in close proximity. Limiting coil interference enables an increase in the flexibility of phased array design and reduces the need for additional system components to cancel out signal noise.

Rapid Assay Including But Not Limited To Lateral Flow Assay For The Detection Of Specific Hormones In Ill Neonatal Foals And Foals With Maladjustment

The present invention provides impending ‘stall side’ diagnostics and for Neonatal Maladjustment Syndrome (Dummy Foals) and anticipated methods for treatment

Portable PCR Thermal Cycler

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a standard diagnostic method used for a variety of applications, including medical diagnostics, food safety, and environmental monitoring. PCR is conventionally done in bench-top thermocyclers, which are heavy, can be complex to operate, and have high power consumption. Furthermore, PCR is time-intensive, requiring up to 40 thermal cycles consisting of multiple temperature steps.   Researchers at UC Berkeley have addressed these issues by developing a system to rapidly heat thin Au films, allowing fast thermal cycling. This system can be used as a simple and portable PCR thermal cycler for point-of-care diagnostics. 

Novel Imaging Technique Combines Optical and MR Imaging Systems To Obtain High Resolution Optical Images

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a novel high resolution imaging technique, referred to as Photo-Magnetic Imaging (PMI), that combines the abilities of optical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems. Images are created with PMI by heating tissue with a light (e.g. laser) and measuring the resulting temperature change with MR Thermometry. This change in temperature can then be related to a tissue’s absorption, scattering, and metabolic properties. PMI addresses the limitations of current optical imaging techniques by providing a repeatable, non-contact, high resolution optical image with increased quantitative accuracy. This technique can be used for a wide-range of applications including but not limited to imaging of small animals for research purposes. This technique may also be used in imaging the tissue and organs of a patient.

Live Imaging of Corneal Lymphatic Vessels

Lymphatic research is an explosive field of new discovery in recent years. Lymphatic dysfunction has been found in a wide array of disorders which include but are not limited to cancers and tumors, inflammation, infection, autoimmune diseases, dry eye, chemical burn, and tissue or organ transplant rejection, etc. The cornea provides an optimal site for lymphatic research due to its accessible location, transparent nature, and lymphatic-free but inducible features. Because there are no pre-existing vessels to consider in this unique tissue, it is exceptionally straightforward and accurate to assess lymphatic events (from formation to maturation and regression) in the cornea. Since lymphatic vessels are not easily visible as blood vessels, previous studies using the cornea have relied on traditional immunohistochemistry assays with dead tissues. Currently, there are no means of direct and harmless visualization of lymphatic vessels within live cornea. Investigators at University of California at Berkeley have addressed this challenge by developing the first live imaging of corneal lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic specific dye is injected into the subconjunctival space to visualize lymphatic vessels at various stages in the cornea under a fluorescence stereo, confocal, or two-photon microscope. Moreover, lymphatic vessels can be visualized in different colors to produce two, three, and four-dimensional images or live videos at a molecular level. The investigators have demonstrated a proof of principle in live mouse cornea. The technique allows time course tracking of dynamic lymphatic processes within the same tissue or subject over a short or long period of time, and can be ideally used to assess the progression of disease development and the effect of drug treatment. Live imaging of corneal lymphatic vessels allows visualization of lymphatic vessels in their natural morphology, state, and interactions with the local environment. This noninvasive method of live imaging of corneal lymphatic vessels is readily applicable to patient examination and the lymphatic dye of dextran is bio-degradable and harmless to human health.

Multiplex Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction (Multiple dPCR)

Researchers at UC Irvine developed a method to amplify up to 100 different target sequences in a single DNA sample with Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction (dPCR) using multiple probes labeled by using combinatorial encoding of fluorescent color and/or intercalating dyes per reaction.

New Light Emission Detection Method Enables High Resolution Optical Imaging of Biological Tissue.

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a novel method for capturing cellular resolution images of biological tissue at depths of up to several millimeters. Conventional fluorescence detection methods utilize microscope objectives for emission light collection, a less effective approach that is only capable of imaging up to one millimeter deep.To improve upon this standard, the UC researchers minimized light losses by optimizing the system's excitation and detection optics. This new novel method increases the ability to capture cellular resolution images of biological tissues at depths 3x that of previously used methods. The improved method is capable of imaging up to 3 millimeters deep, while previous methods were only capable of depths up to 1 millimeter.

Novel Monoclonal Antibodies against Neospora Caninum

UCLA researchers have developed a large number of highly specific monoclonal antibodies against the intracellular parasite Neospora caninum that can be used for diagnostic or research purposes.

Large-Volume Centrifugal Microfluidic Device for Blood Plasma Separation

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a CD microfluidic device that is capable of blood plasma separation of 2 mL of undiluted blood samples. A technician would pipette into the CD device the blood sample for separation. The device is then rotated at high frequencies in order to separate the plasma from the blood. As the frequency of rotation for the CD device is decreased, a siphon valve is primed due to the low frequency of rotation; and the plasma is separated into a collection chamber.

New Etiological Factor in Equine Myeloencephalitis

New Etiological Factor in Equine Myeloencephalitis

Carrier Tests for Point-Restriction Coat Color in the Domestic Cat

Carrier Tests for Point-Restriction and Albinism in the Domestic Cat

Tests for Polycystic Kidney Disease in Domestic Cats

DNA Mutation Tests for PKD in domestic cats.

Test for Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia (HERDA)

Assay for an Informative SNP used to Identify Carriers of the HERDA Disease Allele ****U.S. PATENT NO. 7,608,400 ISSUED OCTOBER 27, 2009****

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