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Deep Junction Low Gain Avalanche Detector

The development of Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGADs) that make controlled use of impact ionization has led to an advancement in the use of silicon diode detectors in particle detection, particularly in the arena of ultrafast (~10 ps) timing. For what are today considered to be “conventional” LGADs, the high fields needed to induce the impact ionization process lead to breakdown between the separated n-p junctions that are used to simultaneously deplete the sensors and establish the readout segmentation. As a result, working devices have included a Junction Termination Extension (JTE) that provide electrostatic isolation between neighboring implants, but at a cost of introducing a dead region between the sensor segments that is insensitive to the deposited charge from an incident particle. The width of this dead region is 50 µm or more, making conventional LGAD sensors inefficient for granularity scales much below 1mm. On the other hand, demands from the particle physics (4D tracking) and photon science (high frame-rate X-Ray imaging) communities call for granularity at the 50 µm scale. Thus, there is great interest in overcoming the current granularity limits of LGAD sensors. There are several ideas, under various levels of development, that have been proposed to circumvent the JTE limitAC-coupled (“AC-LGAD”) LGADs eliminate the need for the JTE by making use of a completely planar (non-segmented) junction structure, and then establish the granularity entirely through the electrode structure, which is AC-coupled to the planar device through a thin layer of insulator. Since charge is not collected directly by the electrodes, there is a point-spread function that relates the signal location to the pad (electrode) response that is a property of the effective AC network formed by the highly doped gain layer just below the insulating layer and the electrode structure. Prototype devices exhibit good response and timing characteristics.Inverse (“ILGAD”) LGADs also eliminate the need for the JTE by making use of a planar junction structure. In this case, the electrode structure is placed on the side of the device opposite the junction. Prototypes with appealing signal characteristics have yet to be produced. In addition, the manufacture of these devices requires processing on both sides of the sensor, which is significantly more difficult than the single-sided processes used for conventional and AC LGADs.Trench-isolated (“TI-LGAD”) LGADs attempt to replace the JTE with a physical trench etched around the edge of the detector segment, which is then filled with insulator. This approach is very new, and its proponents hope to be able to use it to reduce the dead area between segments to as little as 5 µm. First prototypes are just recently available and are under study. Much work remains to be done to show that this approach will produce a stable sensor, and to see how small the dead region can be made.

Systems and Methods for Scaling Electromagnetic Apertures, Single Mode Lasers, and Open Wave Systems

The inventors have developed a scalable laser aperture that emits light perpendicular to the surface. The aperture can, in principal, scale to arbitrarily large sizes, offering a universal architecture for systems in need of small, intermediate, or high power. The technology is based on photonic crystal apertures, nanostructured apertures that exhibit a quasi-linear dispersion at the center of the Brillouin zone together with a mode-dependent loss controlled by the cavity boundaries, modes, and crystal truncation. Open Dirac cavities protect the fundamental mode and couple higher order modes to lossy bands of the photonic structure. The technology was developed with an open-Dirac electromagnetic aperture, known as a Berkeley Surface Emitting Laser (BKSEL).  The inventors demonstrate a subtle cavity-mode-dependent scaling of losses. For cavities with a quadratic dispersion, detuned from the Dirac singularity, the complex frequencies converge towards each other based on cavity size. While the convergence of the real parts of cavity modes towards each other is delayed, going quickly to zero, the normalized complex free-spectral range converge towards a constant solely governed by the loss rate of Bloch bands. The inventors show that this unique scaling of the complex frequency of cavity modes in open-Dirac electromagnetic apertures guarantees single-mode operation of large cavities. The technology demonstrates scaled up single-mode lasing, and confirmed from far-field measurements. By eliminating limits on electromagnetic aperture size, the technology will enable groundbreaking applications for devices of all sizes, operating at any power level. BACKGROUND Single aperture cavities are bounded by higher order transverse modes, fundamentally limiting the power emitted by single-mode lasers, as well as the brightness of quantum light sources. Electromagnetic apertures support cavity modes that rapidly become arbitrarily close with the size of the aperture. The free-spectral range of existing electromagnetic apertures goes to zero when the size of the aperture increases. As a result, scale-invariant apertures or lasers has remained elusive until now.  Surface-emitting lasers have advantages in scalability over commercially widespread vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). When a photonic crystal is truncated to a finite cavity, the continuous bands break up into discrete cavity modes. These higher order modes compete with the fundamental lasing mode and the device becomes more susceptible to multimode lasing response as the cavity size increases. 

Magnetometer Based On Spin Wave Interferometer

Brief description not available

Low-Cost, Multi-Wavelength, Camera System that Incorporates Artificial Intelligence for Precision Positioning

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a system consisting of cameras and multi-wavelength lasers that is capable of precisely locating and inspecting items.

Medical/Surgical Instrument-Bending Device

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a device that allows needles to be reliably and easily bent to a range of specified and reproducible angles. The device also enables protection of the needle tip and the maintenance of needle sterility during bending.

(SD2021-377) Pressure-stabilized dual inlet gas mass spectrometry

Mass spectrometers for high precision gas isotope measurements (e.g., noble gases, carbon, nitrogen) are typically equipped with a dual inlet system in which one side contains the unknown sample gas and the second side contains a known standard. Repeated comparisons of the two gases allows precise determination of differences in the gas composition. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:8.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:107%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Scalable High Intensity Ultrashort Pulse Compressor And Cleaner

This invention is a high intensity ultrashort pulse compressor that filters out low intensity artifacts and is made with commercially available low-cost components. This integrated system also provides scalability and can therefore be used for a range of laser intensities.

Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Detection Of HFA, NO, And C02 From Exhaled Breath

UCI researchers introduced a medical device which simultaneously detects hydrofluoroalkane (HFA), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen monoxide (NO) in exhaled breath for monitoring and improving treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Embedded Power Amplifier

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an amplifier technology that boosts power output in order to improve data transmission speeds for high-frequency communications.

A Fully Integrated Stretchable Sensor Arrays for Wearable Sign Language Translation To Voice

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel machine learning assisted wearable sensor system for the direct translation of sign language into voice with high performance.

A Battery-Less Wirelessly Powered Frequency-Swept Spectroscopy Sensor

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a wirelessly powered frequency-swept spectroscopy sensor.

Unobtrusive Fetal Heartrate Monitoring In The Daily Life

A novel wearable, unobtrusive flexible patch designed to facilitate continuous monitoring of fetal heart rate (fHR) and ECG by pregnant women in a home setting.

Pulsed-Coherent Electronic Front End for Detection and Ranging

Researchers in the UCLA Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) device capable of high resolution, high acquisition measurements with minimized walk error and adjustable detection quality.

Real-time, Passive Non-Line-of-Sight Imaging with Thermal Camera by Exploiting Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a Non-line-of-sight (NLOS) Imaging System using low cost thermal cameras that enable 3D recovery of NLOS heat source for imaging around corners.

Flexible Microfluidic Sensors for Curved Surfaces

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed flexible tactile sensors for curved surfaces that are robust against fatigue and suitable for robotic applications.

Dual-Shell Fused Quartz Resonators and Method of Fabrication

UCI researchers developed a sturdy architecture and straightforward fabrication procedure for the core sensing element in microscale gyroscopes for timing and inertial navigation applications.

Method and Apparatus for Movement Therapy Gaming System

Rehabilitation therapy, while an important tool for the long term recovery of patients affected by brain injury or disease, is expensive and requires one-on-one attention from a certified healthcare professional. UCI researchers have developed a computer-based system that provides arm movement therapy for patients. The system allows patients to independently practice hand and arm movements, improving therapeutic outcomes, while reducing hospital visits and cost for both patients and healthcare providers.

Array Atomic Force Microscopy Enabling Simultaneous Multi-point and Multi-modal Nanoscale Analyses

Nanoscale multipoint structure-function analysis is essential for deciphering the complexity of multiscale physical and biological systems. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows nanoscale structure-function imaging in various operating environments and can be integrated seamlessly with disparate probe-based sensing and manipulation technologies. However, conventional AFMs only permit sequential single-point analysis. Widespread adoption of array AFMs for simultaneous multi-point study is still challenging due to the intrinsic limitations of existing technological approaches.

High-Speed Inspection or Railroad Track Using Passive Acoustics

The number one cause of train derailments globally are unidentified track defects which accumulate over time under the heavy loads and weathering to which rail is exposed. For the last 100 years rail inspection has sought to identify these structural defects before they can pose a serious threat to regular rail traffic. Unfortunately, rail inspection has required specialized low-speed testing cars which can only operate at less than 25% the normal speed of a train. These inspection cars must coordinate their work around planned outages of the rail line, impacting normal rail traffic. Due to this inconvenience, rail defects are typically repaired in real-time, as identified, vs. being prioritized as to potential seriousness and repaired in order of likelihood to cause a future accident.

Pressure Sensitive Fabrics

Piezoelectric sensors have long existed to monitor applied pressures between two objects. In large applications with malleable substrates or where low cost is key, individual piezoelectric sensors are not practical. A variety of applications exist where monitoring the pressure being applied to a soft surface would providing meaningful insights into the system or subject under observation. For instance, in a long-term care setting where patients need to be monitored for pressure ulcers, a bedding material that could sense the pressure points between a person’s body and the mattress could alert care givers that an adjustment in body position is warranted. Likewise, in a sports training application, a pressure sensitive boxing ring canvas could track a boxer’s footwork, or punching power and hand speed if applied to the inside of a punching bag.   Pressure sensitive soft toys could also benefit from feedback that might differ when a child scratches behind their stuffed animal’s ears vs. rubbing its belly.  To achieve discrete sensing in these applications, a low cost bulk sensing system is needed.

Microfluidic Device: Optics-Free, Non-Contact Measurements of Fluids, Bubbles, and Particles in Microchannels

Microfluidic devices have long been touted as a powerful analytical tool with which to characterize a wide range of analytes, including particles, and cells. Despite the apparent convenience of microfluidic technologies for applications in healthcare, such devices often rely on capital-intensive optics and other peripheral equipment that limit throughput, perhaps because the majority of microfluidic devices operate using optics-based principles, which typically require high-speed or sensitive cameras, sophisticated confocal microscopes, vibration isolation tables, and laser excitation systems.

Body Voltage Sensing Based Short Pulse Reading Circuit For STT-RAM

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering have invented a novel circuit design that performs high speed and reliable data reading operations for resistive device-based memory applications.

Infrared Detectors And Heat Recycling Cells Based On Metallo-Graphene Nanocomposites

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a high-responsivity photodetector that utilizes metallo-graphene nanocomposites for superior detection of infrared wavelengths.

A 3D Microfluidic Actuation and Sensing Wearable Technology for In-Situ Biofluid Processing and Analysis

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a novel wearable biosensor capable of measuring biomarkers in real time through biofluids like sweat.

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