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Synchronized DiCAD Switching for FMCW Radar Resolution Enhancement

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a frequency-modulated continuous wave radar system that extends chirp bandwidth, leading to higher axial radar resolutions.

Photonic-Electronic, Real-Time, Signal Processing

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method for ultra-wideband and highly precise, photonic-electronic, signal processing. This technology is capable of high-speed, real-time signal correlation/processing by exploiting RF-photonics, ultra-stable optical frequency combs and high precision electronics.

Multi-Wavelength, Laser Array

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a multi-wavelength, laser array that generates more precise wavelengths than current technologies. The array also delivers narrow linewidths and can operate athermally.

Higher-Speed and More Energy-Efficient Signal Processing Platform for Neural Networks

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a nanophotonic-based platform for signal processing and optical computing in algorithm-based neural networks that is faster and more energy-efficient than current technologies.

Multi-Wavelength, Nanophotonic, Neural Computing System

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a multi-wavelength, Spiking, Nanophotonic, Neural Reservoir Computing (SNNRC) system with high-dimensional (HD) computing capability.

Noninvasive Method and Apparatus for Peripheral Assessment of Vascular Health

UCI researchers introduce a medical device which noninvasively and accurately monitors vascular health metrics such as endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and blood pressure.

Lambda-Reservoir Computing

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a Spectral Reservoir Computer that processes data using nonlinear optical interactions.

System For Fast Multi-Photon Imaging Using Spectrally Diffracted Excitation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a new system for fast multi-photon imaging using spectrally diffracted excitation.

Array Atomic Force Microscopy Enabling Simultaneous Multi-point and Multi-modal Nanoscale Analyses

Nanoscale multipoint structure-function analysis is essential for deciphering the complexity of multiscale physical and biological systems. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows nanoscale structure-function imaging in various operating environments and can be integrated seamlessly with disparate probe-based sensing and manipulation technologies. However, conventional AFMs only permit sequential single-point analysis. Widespread adoption of array AFMs for simultaneous multi-point study is still challenging due to the intrinsic limitations of existing technological approaches.

Ultrafast Optical Transmitters

The widespread adoption of visible light communication (VLC) systems based on light emitting diode (LED) transmitters requires the simultaneous increase in efficiency and speed of the optical source. Efficiency is measured by the external quantum efficiency while speed is quantified by the 3dB modulation bandwidth. Most research on the indium gallium nitride (InGaN) system has focused on improving the EQE because this metric, and its dependence on injection current density is an important factor for the growth of LEDs as illumination source for general lighting purposes. The modulation rate of LEDs is however poised to grow in importance due to the need to couple information processing with illumination. An LED with GHz modulation bandwidth, incorporated as light source in an optical transceiver, can enable a plethora of VLC applications: from chip-to-chip wireless communications in data centers to smart automotive lighting, from safe and RF interference-free wireless local area networks in hospitals and offices to underwater optical communications for the exploration, inspection and maintenance of offshore oil

Ultra-Sensitive Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether (PBDE) Detector

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a common brominated flame retardant, which are commonly found in consumer products. Because they are not chemically bound to polymers, PBDEs are blended in during formation and have the ability to migrate from products into the environment.  Studies suggest that PBDEs pose potential health risks such as hormone disruptors, adverse neurobehavioral toxins and reproductive or developmental effects.  For this reason it is important to have the capability to sense the presence of PBDEs even in low concentrations.

Light-Emitting Hyperbolic Metasurfaces

Hyperbolic metasurfaces (HMS) merge the exotic properties of hyperbolic metamaterials with the potential for lower losses and better device coupling offered by planar metasurfaces. Despite use of single-crystalline silver (Ag), HMS remain inherently lossy, limiting potential applications. Recent work has suggested that Ag could be combined with indium gallium arsenide phosphide (InGaAsP) multiple quantum wells (MQW) to enable transparent propagation of signals through waveguides and multilayers. Described here is the first experimental demonstration of a luminescent HMS (LuHMS) based on nanostructured (NS) Ag/InGaAsP MQW.  

High-Energy, Short Pulse, Tunable Laser Gain Media

The past decade has seen significant advances in the development of high-energy laser (HEL) technologies, with improvements in pumping technology, cavity design, cooling methods, and gain media quality. The search for gain media with superior optical, thermal, and mechanical properties remains intense because improvements in the material properties translate directly to increases in device performance. Advanced laser gain materials that provide access to wavelength tunability, short pulses, and so on have paved the way for the study of light-matter interactions, break-through medical applications, and imaging/spectroscopy.   Traditionally accepted design paradigms dictate that only optically isotropic (cubic) crystal structures with high equilibrium solubility of optically active ions are suitable for polycrystalline laser gain media. The restriction of symmetry is due to light scattering caused by randomly oriented anisotropic crystals, while the solubility problem arises from the need for sufficient active dopants in the media. These criteria limit material choices and exclude materials that have superior thermo-mechanical properties than the state-of-the-art laser materials. Alumina (Al2O3) is an ideal example; it has a higher fracture strength and thermal conductivity than today’s gain materials, which could lead to revolutionary laser performance. However, alumina has uniaxial optical proprieties and the solubility of rare earths (REs) is two-to-three orders of magnitude lower than dopant concentrations in typical RE-based gain media.  

High Thermal Conductivity Boron Arsenide For Thermal Management, Electronics, And Photonics Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel boron arsenide (BAs) material that has an ultra-high thermal conductivity of 1300 W/mK and low cost of synthesis and processing.

Grating-Based Quantum-Cascade Vertical External Cavity Lasers In The Terahertz And Mid-Infrared

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed grating-based quantum-cascade vertical external lasers that operate in the terahertz and mid-infrared range.

Distributed Feedback Laser with Transparent Conducting Oxide Grating

Improved laser diodes which use distributed feedback (DFB) or distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) gratings to enable single wavelength operation in Group III-N lasers operating at visible or ultraviolet wavelengths.

High Speed Indium Gallium Nitride Multi-Quantum Well (InGaN MQW) Photodetector

A way to increase the bandwidth of InGaN MQW photodetectors to make them compatible with high-speed VLC links.

Method Of Creating Scalable Broadband And Tunable Light Emitter At The Nanoscale Using Layered Black Phosphorus

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a novel method to create a room temperature stable broadband tunable light emitter at the nanoscale.

Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezer And Its Fabrication

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel self-locking optoelectronic tweezer (SLOT) for single cell manipulation in conductive buffer over large areas.

Multiple-absorbers offer increased solar conversion efficiencies for artificial photosynthesis

   Researchers at UCI have, for the first time, developed a method for modeling the efficiencies of artificial photosynthetic devices containing multiple light absorbers. As these devices more closely parallel naturally occurring photosynthesis, they offer higher performance than standard single-absorber devices.

Synthesis Of Heteroatom Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry have developed an approach for synthesizing nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with high yield.

Combination of a drug with low level light therapy (LLT) for treatment of wounds

This is a combination of a drug and light technology for the purpose of accelerating the healing of wounds on the skin, ulcers, and elsewhere in the body. Both methods have been shown to accelerate wound healing, and combining the two will potentially result in more rapid healing than either would alone.  

Multi-Tone Continuous Wave LIDAR

Object detection and ranging is a fundamental task for several applications such as autonomous vehicles, atmospheric observations, 3D imaging, topography and mapping. UCI researchers have developed a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system which makes use of frequency modulated continuous waves (FMCW) with several simultaneous radiofrequency tones for improved speed of measurement while maintaining robust spatial information. 

Stereo Image Acquisition By Lens Translation

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel single-objective lens stereo imaging setup for endoscopic applications.

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