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Highly Tunable Magnetic Liquid Crystals

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Templated Synthesis Of Metal Nanorods

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Magnetically Responsive Photonic Nanochains

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Stable Photonic Structures

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Magneto-Optic Modulator

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Light-Driven Ultrafast Electric Gating

The inventors have discovered a new way to generate ultrafast back-gating, by leveraging the surface band bending inherent to many semiconductor materials. This new architecture consists of a standard bulk semiconductor material and a layered material on the surface. Optical pulses generate picosecond time-varying electric fields on the surface material. The inventors have successfully applied this method to a quantum well Rashba system, as this is considered today one of the most promising candidates for spin-based devices, such as the Datta Das spin-transistor. The technology can induce an ultrafast gate and drive time-dependent Rashba and quantum well dynamics never observed before, with switching faster than 10GHz. This approach minimizes lithography and will enable light-driven electronic and spintronics devices such as transistors, spin-transistors, and photo-controlled Rashba circuitry. This method can be applied with minimal effort to any two-dimensional material, for both exfoliated and molecular beam epitaxy grown samples. Electric field gating is one of the most fundamental tuning knobs for all modern solid-state technology, and is the foundation for many solid-state devices such as transistors. Current methods for in-situ back-gated devices are difficult to fabricate, introduce unwanted contaminants, and are unsuited for picosecond time-resolved electric field studies.  

Compressive High-Speed Optical Transceiver

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an optical transceiver that uses compressive sensing to reduce bandwidth requirements and improve signal resolution.

Adapting Existing Computer Networks to a Quantum-Based Internet Future

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an approach for integrating quantum computers into the existing internet backbone.

High-Frequency Imaging and Data Transmission Using a Re-configurable Array Source with Directive Beam Steering

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a reconfigurable radiator array that produces a high frequency directed beam via uninterrupted, scalable, electronic beam steering.

(SD2021-057) Electro-optical mechanically flexible microprobes for minimally invasive interfacing with intrinsic neural circuits

Microelectrodes are the gold standard for measuring the activity of individual neurons at high temporal resolution in any nervous system region and central to defining the role of neural circuits in controlling behavior.Microelectrode technologies such as the Utah or Michigan arrays, have allowed tracking of distributed neural activity with millisecond precision. However, their large footprint and rigidity lead to tissue damage and inflammation that hamper long-term recordings. State of the art Neuropixel and carbon fiber probes have improved on these previous devices by increasing electrode density and reducing probe dimensions and rigidity.Although these probes have advanced the field of recordings, next-generation devices should enable targeted stimulation in addition to colocalized electrical recordings. Optogenetic techniques enable high-speed modulation of cellular activity through targeted expression and activation of light-sensitive opsins. However, given the strong light scattering and high absorption properties of neural tissue optogenetic interfacing with deep neural circuits typically requires the implantation of large-diameter rigid fibers, which can make this approach more invasive than its electrical counterpart.Approaches to integrating optical and electrical modalities have ranged from adding fiber optics to existing Utah arrays to the Optetrode or other integrated electro-optical coaxial structures. These technologies have shown great promise for simultaneous electrical recordings and optical stimulation in vivo. However, the need to reduce the device footprint to minimize immune responses for long-term recordings is still present.

Dynamic Target Ranging With Multi-Tone Continuous Wave Lidar Using Phase Algorithm

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a novel algorithm that is designed to be integrated with current multi-tone continuous wave (MTCW) lidar technology in order to enhance the capability of lidar to acquire range(distance) of fast-moving targets as well as simultaneous velocimetry measurements.

Advanced Imaging By LASER-Trained Algorithms Used To Process Broad-Field Light Photography and Videography

Diagnosing retinal disease, which affects over 200 million people worldwide, requires expensive and complicated analysis of the structure and function of retinal tissue. Recently, UCI developed a training algorithm which, for the first time, is able to assess tissue health from images collected using more common and less expensive optics.

Carbon Nanotube based Variable Frequency Patch-Antenna

Researchers at UCI have developed a patch antenna constructed from carbon nanotubes, whose transmission frequency can be tuned entirely electronically. Additionally, the antenna can be made operable in the microwave to visible frequency regime by simply varying the device dimensions and composition.

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