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Exosome-Mimicking Nanovesicles

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method of synthesizing stem cell-derived, exosome-mimicking, nanovesicles that have the therapeutic potential to rescue apoptotic neurons in culture.

Design Random Heteropolymer To Transport Proton Selectively And Rapidly

Despite decades of effort, it remains challenging, if not impossible, to achieve similar transport performance similar to natural channels. Inspired by the known crystal structures of transmembrane channel proteins, protein sequence-structure-transport relationships have been applied to guide material design. However, producing both molecularly defined channel sizes and channel lumen surfaces that are chemically diverse and spatially heterogeneous have been out of reach. We show that a 4-monomer-based random heteropolymer (RHP) exhibits selective proton transport at a rate similar to those of natural proton channels. Statistical control over the monomer distribution in the RHP leads to well-modulated segmental heterogeneity in hydrophobicity, which facilitates the single RHP chains to insert into lipid bilayers. This in turn produces rapid and selective proton transport, despite the sequence variability among RHP chains. We have demonstrated the importance of:the adaptability enabled by the statistical similaritythe modularity afforded by monomer chemical diversity to achieve uniform behavior in heterogeneous systems. 

Preserving Protein Function Via Statistically Random Heteropolymers

Protein-based materials have the potential to change the current paradigm of materials science. However, it still remains a challenge to preserve protein hierarchical structure and function while making them readily processable. Protein structure is inherently fluid, and it is this property that contributes to their fragility outside of their native environment. Through the use of rationally designed statistically random heteropolymers, it is possible to stabilize proteins at each hierarchical level and process them in organic solvents, a common need for materials fabrication. The chemical and architectural complexities of statistically random heteropolymers provide a modular platform for tunable protein-polymer-solvent interactions. This provides opportunities not offered by small molecule surfactants or amphiphilic block copolymers. Through evaluation of horseradish peroxidase and green fluorescent protein structure, we show that statistically random heteropolymers can stabilize enzymes. Allowing for activity retention when stored in organic solvent, over 80% activity was observed after 24 hours. Furthermore, horseradish peroxidase and chymotrypsin proteins, when encapsulated in statistically random heteropolymers, are still accessible to their substrates while remaining inaccessible to the denaturing organic solvent. Statistically random heteropolymers have potential in creating stimuli-reponsive materials and nanoreactors composed of proteins and synthetic materials.

Smart Dialysis Catheter

UCLA researchers in the Department of Cardiology at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine have developed a smart dialysis catheter that can measure different patient vitals in real-time to prevent hospitalizations due to renal failure.

Reacting Molecules and Colloids Electrophoretically

Researchers in UCLA's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have harnessed gel electrophoresis in order to direct and program controlled collisional reactions between pulse-like bands of molecules and/or colloidal reagent species.

Biomimetic Conductive Hydrogels

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel electrically conductive scaffold system with a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel for biomimetic research to treat spinal cord and other central nervous system (CNS) injuries.

Systems and Methods for Monodisperse Drop Generation and Use

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed systems and methods to produce single particle, monodisperse droplets for use in digital assays, targeted drug delivery, and theranostics.

New Classes Of Cage And Polyhedron And New Classes Of Nanotube And Nanotube With Planar Faces

UCLA researchers have developed a novel algorithm that can be used to design unique self-assembled molecules and nanostructures.

Capture And Stimulated Release Of Circulating Tumor Cells On Polymer Grafted Silicon Nanostructures

UCLA researchers in the department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology have developed a novel capture system of circulating tumor cells for the early detection of metastatic cancer.

Single Circulating Tumor Cell Isolation Using Laser Microdissection And A Polymer Enrichment Assay

UCLA researchers in the department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology have developed a novel matrix polymer capture system of circulating tumor cells that preserves biomolecular integrity through laser microdissection for the early detection of metastatic cancer.

Generic Method for Controlled Assembly of Molecules

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, in collaboration with researchers at IBM, have developed a widely applicable method to assemble molecules regardless of their intrinsic self-assembly properties.

Process For Reducing Sizes Of Emulsion Droplets

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel method of reducing sizes of droplets in multiple emulsion systems.

Nanoparticles and Imaging Methods for MRI-Guided Stimuli-Responsive Theranostics

UCLA researchers from the Department of Medicine have developed novel nanoparticle and imaging methods for the MRI-guided targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

Preparation Of Functionalized Polypeptides, Peptides, And Proteins By Alkylation Of Thioether Groups

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering Department, have developed new methods for adding different functional groups on polypeptides.  The UCLA researchers have used this method to create a platform to create and modify nanoscale vesicles and hydrogels for use in nanoscale drug delivery particles, injectable drug depots, imaging and detection, industrial biomaterials, and wound management.

Hydrogel For Endogenous Neuronal Progenitor Cells (NPC) Recruitment

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have developed a novel hydrogel that aids in neuronal regeneration post stroke or disease.

Amphiphilic Derivatives Of Thioether Containing Block Copolypeptides

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a new method to generate amphiphilic block copolypeptides.

A 3D Microfluidic Actuation and Sensing Wearable Technology for In-Situ Biofluid Processing and Analysis

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering have developed a novel wearable biosensor capable of measuring biomarkers in real time through biofluids like sweat.

Facile Synthesis and Processing of Polymer Aerogels or Ambigels for Thermal Insulating Applications

Researchers at the UCLA Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering have developed novel processing methods for polymer aerogels for thermal insulation and low thermal conductivity applications.

Nanoparticulate Mineralized Collagen Glycosaminoglycan Scaffold With An Anti-Resorption Factor

Researchers in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and the Institute of Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign (UIUC) have developed novel methods to incorporate anti-resorption factor into nanoparticulate mineralized collagen glycosaminoglycan scaffold to maximize bone regeneration.

Nano Biosensing System

Metabolites can provide real-time information about the state of a person’s health. Devices that can detect metabolites are commercially available, but are unable to detect very low concentrations of metabolites. Researchers at UCI have developed surfaces that use nanosensors to detect much lower concentrations of such metabolites.

Methods And Devices for Continuous Analyte Sensing with Microporous Annealed Particle Gels

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed novel microporous annealed particle gels for long-term continuous monitoring of blood metabolites.

Guided Magnetic Nanospears For Targeted And High-Throughput Intracellular Delivery

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Department of Molecular & Medical Pharmacology have developed novel magnetic nanostructures that can be used to carry and/or deliver biomolecular cargo intracellularly to cells.

Label-Free Digital Bright Field Analysis of DNA Amplification

UCLA researchers in the department of Bioengineering have developed a novel method for quantitative analysis of DNA amplification products.

Quantitative Deformability Cytometry: Rapid, Calibrated Measurements Of Cell Mechanical Properties

UCLA researchers in the Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology have developed a novel microfluidic device that enables rapid measurement of cell mechanical properties.

Approach For Efficient Protein Incorporation Into Recombinant Vaults

UCLA researchers in the departments of Medicine, Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, and Bioengineering have developed a novel method for loading protein payloads into vault nanoparticle carriers.

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