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High Performance and Flexible Chemical And Bio Sensors Using Metal Oxide Semiconductors

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a simple method producing thin, sensitive In2O3-based conformal biosensors based on field-effect transistors using facile solution-based processing for future wearable human technologies as well as non-invasive glucose testing.

Evaporation-Based Method For Manufacturing And Recycling Of Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a new method to manufacture and recycle metal matrix nanocomposites.

Silver Nanowire-Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle As A Transparent Conductor For Optoelectronic Devices

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a novel composite material made of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs).

Interposers Made From Nanoporous Anodic Films

Many electronic devices rely on integrated circuits, whereby different electrical components are incorporated into a single chip and connected to one another through interposers. Researchers at UCI and Integra have developed a new interposer that allows for a high density of electrical connections, and whose fabrication is cheaper and easier than conventional methods.

Ultra Light Amphiphilic And Resilient Nanocellulose Aerogels And Foams

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an energy efficient method of producing ultra-light aerogels with excellent dry compressive strength and tunable hydrophobicity by ambient drying of nanocellulose wet gels.

Synthetic polymer nanoparticle hydrogels for drug screening

Synthetic polymer nanoparticle hydrogels and polymers can be designed to interact with and sequester targeted bio-macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, and carbohydrates. These relatively inexpensive and target specific polymers could potentially replace current antibody therapies and protein purification procedures.

Synthesis Technique to Achieve High-Anisotropy FeNi

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an innovative synthesis approach to achieve high anisotropy L1 FeNi by combining physical vapor deposition and a high speed rapid thermal annealing (RTA).

A Micro/Nanobubble Oxygenated Solutions for Wound Healing and Tissue Preservation

Soft-tissue injuries and organ transplantation are common in modern combat scenarios. Organs and tissues harvested for transplantation need to be preserved during transport, which can be very difficult. Micro and nanobubbles (MNBs) offer a new technology that could supply oxygenation to such tissues prior to transplantation, thus affording better recovery and survival of patients. Described here is a novel device capable of producing MNB solutions that can be used to preserve viability and function of such organs/tissue. Additionally, these solutions may be used with negative pressure wound therapy to heal soft-tissue wounds.

Enhancing Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials with Interfacial Films

Nanostructured materials are a category of materials comprised of nanometer-scale crystals which exhibit order of magnitude higher strength when compared to their traditional counterparts with larger crystal sizes. The application of nanostructured materials has been limited due to seemingly inherent low ductility and high-temperature instability. The inventors at UCI have developed a nanostructured material that simultaneously exhibits increased ductility, strength, and thermal stability by the incorporation of amorphous intergranular films.

Ultrafine Nanowires As Highly Efficient Electrocatalysts

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel process of synthesizing ultrafine jagged Pt nanowires with a record high utilization efficiency for fuel cell catalyst applications.

Novel Metal Chalcogenides For Pseudocapacitive Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel metal chalcogenides for pseudocapacitive applications. 

Enhanced Cycle Lifetime With Gel Electrolyte For Mn02 Nanowire Capacitors

The invention is novel way of preparing electrodes for nanowire-based batteries and capacitors with extremely long cycle lifetimes. The proposed assemblies last much longer than any comparable state of the art nanowire energy storage device, without loss of performance, and are comparable to liquid electrolyte-based technologies in terms of their figures of merit.

An Aza-Diels-Alder Approach To Polyquinolines

The invention is a simple and inexpensive synthetic approach to a diverse library of new polymeric materials with a host of useful and unique properties. Most notably, these materials can serve as precursors to rationally designed and bottom-up synthesized graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), including N-doped GNRs and GNRs with precisely defined and functionalized edges.

Gate-Induced Source Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor (Gistfet)

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel gate-induced source tunneling field-effect transistor (GISTFET).

Nanoporous Tin Powder For Energy Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a method of synthesizing micrometer tin particles with nanosporous architecture and have successfully demonstrated the use of these particles as a high energy density anode for Na-ion and Li-ion batteries. 

Injectable Magnetic Nanocomposite Implants For Tissue Repair

Background: In 2014, the orthopedic soft tissue repair market was $10.3B, and is expected to grow due to an increasing number of soft tissue injuries with very few alternatives to surgery. Current procedures are very invasive, and require drilling holes followed by bone marrow extraction to repair the damaged tissue. Not only is the procedure costly, but the patient is held in recovery for a very long period of time.  Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed 3D magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds that can be injected into the target site for improved tissue regeneration and healing. The material can fill any shape or size of the defective site in just 2 injections. The first injection targets subchondral bone followed by a second injection that promotes cartilage regeneration. This novel invention will allow the patient to save costs incurred on surgical procedures, and regain full functionality under a shorter recovery time.

Low-variability, Self-assembled Monolayer Doping Methods

Semiconductor materials are fundamental materials in all modern electronic devices. Continuous demand for faster and more energy-efficient electronics is pushing miniaturization and scaling to unprecedented levels. Controlled and uniform doping of semiconductor materials with atomic accuracy is critical to materials and device performance. In particular, junction depth and dopant concentration need to be tightly controlled to minimize contact resistance, as well as variability effects due to random dopant fluctuations in the channel. Conventional doping methods such as ion implantation is imprecise and can have large variability effect. Moreover, energetic introduction of dopant species will often cause crystal damage, leading to incompatibility with nanostructured-materials and further performance degradation. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have experimented with an alternative approach to a wafer-scale surface doping technique first developed at the UC Berkeley in 2007. The team has demonstrated a controlled approach for monolayer doping (MLD) in which gas phase dopant-containing molecules form low-variability, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on target semiconductor surfaces.

Enzyme-Responsive Nanoparticles For Targeted Accumulation And Prolonged Retention In Myocardial Infarction

Heart failure following a myocardial infarction (MI) continues to be one of the leading causes of death. Immediately after MI, there is an initial inflammatory response with cardiomyocyte death and degradation of the extracellular matrix. This results in negative left ventricular (LV) remodeling leading to wall thinning, LV dilation, and depressed cardiac function. Several experimental approaches have been examined to inhibit this negative remodeling process. One promising direction is the use of injectable biomaterials, which can be used as stand-alone scaffolds to encourage endogenous repair or for delivering therapeutics such as cells, growth factors, or small molecules. Early intervention of MI has the potential to slow or inhibit the progression of negative LV remodeling. To date, most therapeutic delivery strategies have involved intramyocardial biomaterial injections, although translation to acute MI patients is unlikely given the increased risk of ventricular rupture immediately post-MI. One promising, minimally invasive strategy is the systemic injection of nanoparticles. However, many of the investigated systems lack long-term retention within the MI. 

A New Methodology For 3D Nanoprinting

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered a novel protocol to enable 3D printing with nanometer precision in all three dimensions using polyelectrolyte (PE) inks and atomic force microscopy.

Universal Coating Compound

Polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) has many characteristics that make it the most popular candidate for producing organ-on-a-chip devices or mirco-physiological systems (MPS) devices. After crosslinking, PDMS has shown to be biologically compatible and amenable to many standard cell culture techniques due to it’s transparency, oxygen permeability, and low auto-fluorescence. However, due to PDMS’s hydrophobicity, molecules that are also hydrophobic partition into the PDMS to produce unpredictable concentrations in cell and media channels making it impossible to predict the actual dosing concentrations for drug investigations. This unpredictability is an obstacle for using organ-on-a-chip devices as screens for drug candidates in discovery stages.   Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a simple coating procedure that allows the formation of substrate independent (universal) coatings. The researchers identified a novel compound able to form stable coatings that outperformed existing dip-coating precursor molecules in their ability to prevent absorbance of small molecules into a variety of organic and inorganic polymers, such as PDMS. 

X-Ray-Triggered Release of Drugs from Nanoscale Drug Carriers

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have identified a means by which large quantities of inactive drugs (particularly chemotherapeutics) can be delivered by nanoscale drug carriers to a target location where they can be rendered active by X-rays.

Manufacturing of Tungsten Scandate Nano-Composite Powder via Sol-Gel Method for High Current Density and Long-Life Cathodes

The researchers at University of California, Davis have developed a new process for manufacturing tungsten scandate nano-composite powder that produces high current density and long-life cathodes for high-power terahertz vacuum electron devices. Scandate tungsten nano-composite cathodes enable advancement of microwave sources that bridge the "Terahertz gap."

Chemical Energy Storage Based on Nanoporous Aluminum

Researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA have developed a novel form of nanoporous aluminum hydride for storing hydrogen at room temperature and pressure.

Potential Driven Electrochemical Modification of Tissue

Researchers at UC Irvine have developed a minimally invasive technology that uses electrical potentials to perform a variety of to modify and reshape soft tissues such as cartilage

High Performance Thin Films from Solution Processible Two-Dimensional Nanoplates

UCLA researchers in the departments of Chemistry and Materials Science have recently developed a novel material for use in flexible, printed electronics.

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