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Ligands for Improved Angiogenesis and Endothelialization of Blood Contacting Devices

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered novel targeting ligands that can specifically bind and capture endothelial cells and endothelial progenitors for improved endothelialization and angiogenesis of medical devices and scaffolds.

Novel Solid Tumor Chemodrug LLS2

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a new library of small molecule LLS2 that can kill a variety of cancer cells

Novel Applicator Using FTA Paper to Collect Touch DNA

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a novel approach to an applicator designed to expedite and increase the efficiency of the DNA collection process at crime scenes.

Growth-Factor Nanocapsules With Tunable Release Capability For Bone Regeneration

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Orthopedic Surgery have developed a method to deliver therapeutic proteins directly to the tumor site using nanocapsules.

Protein Nanocapsules With Detachable Zwitterionic Coating For Protein Delivery

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have developed a method to deliver therapeutic proteins directly to the tumor site using nanocapsules.

Rapid And Selective Cycloaddition Reaction For Applications In Molecular Imaging

UCLA researchers in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have designed a new reaction with 18F-chemistry platform, allowing a highly selective, efficient and rapid approach to label biomolecules with a chemical reporter (i.e. radionuclide, fluorescent dye) for molecular imaging.

New Method to Increase the Rate of Protein Ligation Catalyzed by the S. Aureus Sortase A Enzyme

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a new method to increase the rate of ligation catalyzed by the S. aureus Sortase A enzyme

Paramagnetic Polymers for Improved Magnetic Resonance Imaging

A method using anions containing transition or rare-earth metals to provide paramagnetic functionality to polymers making them useful in magnet resonance imaging.

New label-free method for direct RNase activity detection in biological samples

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a new and simple, label-free method to detect milligram levels of RNase activity in undiluted biological samples that is selective, accurate and scalable

Graphene-Based Sensors For Mitochondrial Functions

One of the key identifiers of cancer is an interruption in normal cellular life cycles, including pre-programmed cell death. Researchers at UCI have recently developed a method to monitor this cell death via graphene-based sensors which provide increased accuracy and allow for a higher degree of cancer treatment personalization over traditional techniques.

SIMPLE AND RAPID METHOD FOR QUANTIFICATION OF HALOGINATED DISACCHARIDES, SUCH AS SUCRALOSE, IN AQUEOUS MEDIA

Sucralose has become widely used as an artificial sweetener due in large part that it has low caloric content and is 600 times sweeter than table sugar (sucrose). Due to its resistance to metabolic degradation, sucralose can also be used as a marker for noninvasively assessing gastrointestinal small intestine or colonic permeability. This urinary marker is traditionally analyzed by time consuming and expensive methods, such as high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry or evaporative light scatter as the detectors. We have developed an alternative methodology of using a chemical-fluorescent technique for rapid analysis of halogenated disaccharides, such as sucralose.

Production of Glycolipid PEFAs from Yeasts

Method of using basidiomycetous yeasts to convert carbohydrates to glycolipid biosurfactants 

Building blocks for 3D, modular microfluidics

Researchers at the University of CA, Irvine have developed modular microfluidic platforms consisting of microfluidic building blocks that can be connected in various configurations to construct complete microfluidic devices for different applications.

A Micro/Nanobubble Oxygenated Solutions for Wound Healing and Tissue Preservation

Soft-tissue injuries and organ transplantation are common in modern combat scenarios. Organs and tissues harvested for transplantation need to be preserved during transport, which can be very difficult. Micro and nanobubbles (MNBs) offer a new technology that could supply oxygenation to such tissues prior to transplantation, thus affording better recovery and survival of patients. Described here is a novel device capable of producing MNB solutions that can be used to preserve viability and function of such organs/tissue. Additionally, these solutions may be used with negative pressure wound therapy to heal soft-tissue wounds.

Dual-Labeled E-AB Platform for Continuous, Real-Time Monitoring of Small Molecules

A dual-reporter correction to enhance the performance of electrochemical aptamer-based sensors in whole blood.

Method For Imaging Neurotransmitters In Vitro and In Vivo Using Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

Neurotransmitters play a central role in complex neural networks by serving as chemical units of neuronal communication.  Quantitative optical methods for the detection of changes in neurotransmitter levels has the potential to profoundly increase our understanding of how the brain works. Therapeutic drugs that target neurotransmitter release are used ubiquitously to treat a vast array of brain and behavioral disorders.  For example, new methods in this sphere could provide a new platform by which to validate the function of drugs that alter modulatory neurotransmission, or to screen antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs.  However, currently in neuroscience, few optical methods exist that can detect neurotransmitters with high spatial and temporal resolution in vitro or in vivo.  Brain tissue also readily scatters visible wavelengths of light currently used to perform biological imaging, and neuronal tissue and has an abundance of biomolecules that are chemically or structurally similar and therefore hard to specifically distinguish.  Furthermore, neurotransmission relevant processes occur at challenging spatial  and temporal scales.    UC Berkeley investigators have developed polymer-functionalized carbon nanotubes for in vitro and in vivo quantification of extracellular modulatory neurotransmitter levels using optical detectors. The method uses the fluorescent optical properties of polymer-functionalized carbon nanotubes to selectively report changes in concentration of specific neurotransmitters. The scheme is novel in that the detection method applies to wide variety of specific neurotransmitters, it is an optical method and therefore gives greater spatial information, and enables the potential for imaging of one or more neurotransmitters. The optical method also produces less damage to the surrounding tissue than methods that implant electrodes or cells and allows high resolution localization with other methods of optical investigation. The invention takes advantage of favorable fluorescence properties of carbon nanotubes, such as carbon nanotube emission in the near infrared and infinite fluorescence lifetime.  The near infrared emission scatters less than shorter wavelengths, enabling greater signal recovery from deeper tissue, and allows greater compatibility with other techniques. The optical properties also enable long term potentially even chronic use. 

Microfluidic Pressure Regulator For Robust Hydrogel Loading Without Bursting

This invention is aimed at controlling the pressure in 3D cell cultures. It consists of a combination of microfluidic channels, which surround the extracellular matrix (ECM), tunable pressure-regulated valves, which activate when a threshold pressure is reached in the ECM, and a repository, to direct excess gel away from the cell culture if the threshold pressure is exceeded. It can prevent leakage of gel between adjacent cell cultures in high-throughput arrays and is compatible with various cell culture materials and injection equipment.

C3d-binding Biomarkers for Detection of Complement-mediated Inflammation

Background: The complement immune system is implicated in many acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and autoimmune diseases, including neurological (Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis), renal (lupus nephritis and glomerulonephritis), ocular (age-related macular degeneration), and systemic (lupus and rheumatoid arthritis). The complement protein C3d resides covalently attached in inflamed tissues, and it is an excellent biomarker target for complement-mediated inflammation, even at early disease stages prior to clinical manifestations.  Brief Description: UCR researchers have discovered several small chemical compounds with intrinsic fluorescence properties that bind to complement C3d. These compounds can serve as molecular biomarkers for the detection of complement activation using fluorescence imaging. The compounds can be developed to become noninvasive in vivo diagnostics of complement-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, for spatiotemporal monitoring of disease progression, and for delivering therapeutics to sites of inflammation.

Screening Platform for Anti-influenza Drugs

In addition to their protective functions as lubricants and physical and immunologic barriers, recent work has demonstrated that mucins also provide protection from influenza virus infection by presenting decoy ligands for the virus. In airway passages, target glycans on airway cells are covered with a thick layer of mucus containing dense array of glycosylated proteins (mucins). However, most screens are either overly simplified (and therefore not representative of the natural mucin barrier) or not translatable to a high-throughput platform. Hence, the development of a useful high throughput drug screening method has been hindered by the inability to streamline the process of replicating the complex environment that airborne invaders naturally confront.

Functionally Selective Ligands for Study and Inhibition of Inflammation

Background: Due to the complexity of the complement system cascade, biological roles of many signaling receptors are unknown. Additionally, biased ligand binding to cell-bound receptors may lead to selective intracellular effector binding and ligand-specific pathway activation and function. Mechanistic knowledge forms the basis for assay development to explore pharmacology against complement-mediated inflammatory diseases.   Brief Description: A multidisciplinary team of researchers from UCR, Texas A&M, Sheffield, and Queensland have discovered the first functionally selective peptide ligands for a complement system receptor that is involved in inflammation. The peptides are functionally selective ligands of C5aR2 but not C5aR1 or C3aR, and they have been characterized in vitro and in vivo. These peptides are novel tools that can modulate the activity of the receptor in vitro and in vivo, and interrogate the function of the receptor and its implication in inflammatory diseases.

Sensitive, Specific Ratiometric Fluorescence-based DNA Detection

Fluorescent silver nanoclusters for nucleic acid detection. 

Cell Membrane-cloaked Nanofibers Promote Cell Proliferation and Function

Cloaking of synthetic structures with natural cell membranes has emerged as an intriguing strategy for presenting natural cell surface antigens and functions in the context of synthetic compositions with designed functions. Early forays into the field focused primarily on the development of cell membrane-coated spherical nanoparticles. While a boon to material sciences, such spherical structures cannot address the full spectrum of potential applications and the application of cell membrane cloaking techniques to nanofibers enables drastically different characteristics and applications.

3D Printed Artificial Micro-Fish

With recent advances in nanoscience and nanomanufacturing technologies, the areas of biomimetic micro-robotics and nanomotors have seen rapid development in realizing functionalities mimicking natural organisms with self-propulsion. The capability to fabricate complex architectures and miniaturize the dimension is highly desired for designing and customizing more functionalized, integrated and intelligent micromachines for different applications. In light of these challenges, rapid 3D optical printing offers a promising alternative for efficiently manufacturing controllable microswimmers with complex 3D microscale structures composed of patterned heterogeneous materials as well as different functional components.

Synthesis of Lipobactins and Teixobactin Analogues – New Antimicrobial Compositions against Gram-Positive Bacteria

With the discovery of penicillin in the 1940’s, many scientists proclaimed the defeat of infectious diseases which had plagued mankind. However, the remarkable healing power of antibiotics unfortunately invited widespread and indiscriminate use of antibiotics. This misuse and overuse of antibiotics has led to the dramatic rise in antibiotic resistant bacterial strains and increased healthcare costs.

Novel cyanobacteriochromes responsive to light in the far-red to near-infrared region

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have identified new cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that detect and fluoresce in the far-red and near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

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