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A Piezoelectric Drug Delivery System

Prof. Jin Nam and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a stimulus-responsive drug delivery system, based on electrospun piezoelectric nanofibrous membranes. The drug release characteristics of these nanofibers can be fine-tuned by modulating their piezoelectric properties via fiber size control, thus the sensitivity of the material to the magnitude and frequency of the applied pressures. In this regard, stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems are promising methods in overcoming the pharmacogenetics associated vulnerabilities in response to systemic drug administration, by controlling when, where, and how much drug is released to accommodate a more personalized therapy.  Fig 1: Model drug release from nanofibrous membranes composed of 70 nm average fiber diameter in vivo in response to mechanical stimulation. The membranes were conjugated with a fluorescence dye (Vivotag) and implanted under vastus lateralis near femur in rats. The release of the drug under non-invasive mechanical activation was determined by in vivo fluorescence imaging. ** indicates p < 0.01.  

Insulin Infusion Cannulas with Superior Performance

Researchers at UCI have developed the application of a biocompatible material to insulin infusion devices for Type 1 Diabetes to improve device strength, reduce scar tissue buildup, and increase the efficiency of insulin delivery.

Gut Microbiome Enhancement via Co-delivery of Antibodies and Activated Bacterial Strains

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a mechanism to deliver unique complexes of protective antibodies and probiotics to the gut.

Selective Antimicrobial Peptides From Human Milk For Treatment Of Severe Infections

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed human milk-derived peptides that have demonstrated broad-spectrum, antibacterial, activity against a variety of harmful pathogens - without these peptides harming most, non-pathogenic, bacterial, flora.

Novel Drug Delivery Platform

This invention is a novel method for synthetically designing protein carriers (enFoldin) for small molecules.  

Non-Antibiotic, Treatment for Recurrent UTIs in Canines

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a biologic treatment for mitigating pain and treating acute urinary tract infections (UTIs) in canines.

Bioengineered RNA Molecules for Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to use biologic RNA molecules for cancer research and therapy.

Bioengineered Let-7c Therapy for HCC Treatment

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a bioengineered, RNA-based treatment for advanced liver cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

Exosome-Mimicking Nanovesicles

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method of synthesizing stem cell-derived, exosome-mimicking, nanovesicles that have the therapeutic potential to rescue apoptotic neurons in culture.

Antimicrobial and Osteoinductive Hydrogel for Dental Applications

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering developed osteoinductive and antimicrobial hydrogel adhesives for dental applications.

A New Cell-free Protein Expression System with three-fold higher protein yield in batch and continuous mode than existing systems

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method for preparing a bacterial cell lysate that results in higher protein expression than existing cell-free systems. The new whole-cell lysate system comes with additional advantages, including the ability to synthesize protein from linear DNA, directly amenable to continuous or flow-based reaction, and compatibility with existing manufacturing workflow.

Adenylyl Cyclase Catalytic Domain Gene Transfer for Heart Failure

Heart failure (HF) is a disease of epidemic portions in the United States affecting over 6 million patients with heart failure in the US, with 400,000 new cases per year. It is the most common cause of non-elective admission to the hospital in subjects 65 yrs and older. The introduction of new drugs over the last 30 years that target pathways critical to progression of HF, along with implantable cardiac defibrillators and resynchronization devices have shown some successes, however, both the morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure remains at unacceptable levels, with as many as 30-40% of affected individuals dying within 5 years of diagnosis. Recently, preclinical and clinical trials have tested gene transfer to increase left ventricular (LV) function, especially in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

Use of Gene Therapy to Treat Joint Disease and Synovial Tumors

The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center characterizes Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) as a rare disease estimated to occur in ~ 5-6 people out of 100,000. This locally invasive tumor most often occurs in younger adults and causes severe damage to joints. The first line of treatment is surgery but at least 50% of patients require multiple surgeries over many years due to re-growth of the tumor.

Peptide Mediated Oligonucleotide Delivery to the CNS

Many diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) arise from the accumulation of proteins such as α-synuclein (aSyn) in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) or Aß in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The ability to regulate the expression at the gene transcription level would be beneficial for reducing the accumulation of these proteins or regulating expression levels of other genes in the CNS. aSyn also accumulates in other neurodegenerative diseases including dementia with Lewy Body (DLB), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Gaucher’s disease. This means that regulation of aSyn expression may be crucial to the therapeutic control of numerous neurodegenerative diseases.

Milk Fat Globules As A Universal Delivery System

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed methods that utilize molecules encapsulated in milk fat globules and plant oleosomes to deliver bioactive compounds for a variety of applications.

Biomimetic Conductive Hydrogels

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel electrically conductive scaffold system with a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based hydrogel for biomimetic research to treat spinal cord and other central nervous system (CNS) injuries.

Improvement To Retroviral Vectors Containing The Human Ubiquitin C Promoter

UCLA researchers in the Department of Molecular Biology have developed a lentiviral vector, “pCCLc-roUBC”, containing the cellular promoter from the human ubiquitin C gene (UBC), to improve transgene expression in retroviral vectors.

Crosslinkable Polymer Coating Prevents Bacterial Infection on Implant Surface

UCLA researchers in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery have developed a polymer implant coating that mitigates bacterial infections on the implant surface.

Gelatin Methacryloyl Based Microneedle

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed gelatin methacryloyl microneedles (GelMA MN) for minimally invasive, sustained transdermal drug delivery.

Brain-Specific Kinase Inhibition to Mitigate Systemic Toxicity

The goal of this invention is to overcome the challenges of previous approaches by selectively targeting treatments to the CNS without peripheral toxicity. Kinase inhibition is targeted to the central nervous system (CNS) by combining brain-permeable kinase inhibitors and a brain-impermeable blocking molecule.

Augmentations to Lentiviral Vectors to Increase Expression

UCLA researchers in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have developed a novel method to produce short lentiviral vectors with tissue-specific expression, with a primary focus on lentiviral vectors for treating sickle cell disease and other disorders of hemoglobin.

Optimized Lentiviral Vector for Stem Cell Gene Therapy of Hemoglobinopathies

UCLA researchers in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have developed a novel method to produce short lentiviral vectors with tissue-specific expression, with a primary focus on lentiviral vectors for treating sickle cell disease and other disorders of hemoglobin.

Generation Of Minimal Enhancer Elements Using Massively Parallel Reporter Assays

UCLA researchers in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have developed a novel method to produce short lentiviral vectors with tissue-specific expression, with a primary focus on lentiviral vectors for treating sickle cell disease and other disorders of hemoglobin.

Use Of Non-Ionic Copolypeptide Hydrogels For Cell Suspension And Cell And Molecule Delivery

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Bioengineering, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Neurobiology have developed novel copolypeptide hydrogel formulations for the delivery of cells and molecules to locations throughout the body, including the central nervous system.

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