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Modular Phantom for the Assessment of Imaging Performance And Dosage in Cone-Beam CT

Researchers at the University of California, Davis and Johns Hopkins University have created a 3D modular phantom for the assessment of imaging performance and dosimetry in cone-beam CT.

ABSTRACT: Variable Gaseous Fuels Engine

Brief description not available

Conductive and Elastic Nanocellulose Aerogels

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed conductive nanocellulose aerogels as building blocks for mechanical strain sensors and coaxial aerogel fibers for cryo- and thermo-protective insulation.

System and Method for Flexible Low-Energy Membrane-Based Liquid Purification

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have developed a platform and method for membrane-based water purification and desalination that combines operational flexibility with energy efficiency, allowing effective treatment and desalination of raw feed water over a wider range of solute concentrations and product recovery.

Quality interference from living digital twins in IoT-enabled manufacturing systems

Researchers at UCI have developed a non-intrusive method for building a virtual replica of manufacturing machine, which allows for accurate diagnostics of the state of the system. This provides manufacturers with real-time information on quality control and immediately identifies any malfunctions in the system.

Intercalated Graphene Layers for Charge Extraction and Enhanced Light Absorption

Quantum dots (QDs) have shown extraordinary optical properties based on their size-tunable band gap and low-processing cost that have allowed the realization of promising photodetectors and solar cells. However, the short diffusion length and mobility in QD films remains a main limitation and subject of intensive research as the key to improve the performance of QD based optoelectronic devices. A very innovative strategy to overcome the low mobility of QDs is to use them as sensitizer with high conductive systems such as graphene, 2D semiconductors and Si. The combination of graphene (Gr) and QD into a hybrid device splits the photoconversion/detection “tasks” between these two complementary nanomaterials: QDs absorb light and generate photocharges, while graphene takes care of charge collection for efficient transport.

Upconversion Plasmonic Mapping: A Direct Plasmonic Visualization And Spectrometer-Free Sensing Method

Researchers led by Xiangfeng Duan from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA have developed a cheap and efficient way to map surface plasmon polaritons in order to detect trace amounts of biomolecules.

Physical Multi-Layer Arm Phantom For Body Area Networks

Researchers at UCI have developed an oil-based in vitro phantom that accurately mimics the electrical properties of the human arm. Due to the increased accuracy it affords, this phantom can be used to test the efficiencies of wireless medical devices in body area networks.

Automatic Personal Daily Activity Tracking

Researchers at UCI have developed an entirely unobtrusive method for chronicling and analyzing an individual’s daily activities over time, which relies on tracking user activity via their smartphone. This technology has important applications in health and behavior monitoring, where it can be used to signal the early stages of various diseases and disorders.

Value-Based Information Flow Tracking in Software Packages

A collaboration between UCLA and Rutgers have developed a novel information flow tracking technique to detect potential data leaks in mobile devices.

Expandable Vascular Sheath

UCLA researchers in the Department of Radiology have developed a novel expandable vascular sheath that can be used for encasement and facilitated extraction of foreign objects that have a larger cross section than existing vascular sheaths.

Zero-power microfluidic osmotic pumps using ultra-thin PDMS membranes

Researchers at UCI have developed a zero-energy, inexpensive micropump that uses osmotic pressure alone to draw fluid through a microfluidic device.

Hydrostatic pressure-driven passive micropumps

Researchers at UCI have developed an inexpensive and entirely passive pump for microfluidic devices, which yields steady, controllable, and long-lived fluid flow through the device.

Near-Realistic Sports Motion Analysis and Activity Monitoring

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computer Science have developed a new technology to fight the growing obesity epidemic by encouraging exercise in video games.

Materials for Autonomous Tracking, Guiding, Modulating, and Harvesting of Energetic Emissions

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a novel photo-responsive polymer that can real-time detect, track, modulate, and harvest incident optical signals and a broad range of energetic emissions at high accuracy and fast response rate.

Adiabatic Dispersion-Managed Frequency Comb Generation

UCLA researchers have developed a novel methods and apparatus for the production of chip-scale dispersion-managed dissipative Kerr solitons in frequency combs, and their application in mode-locked and pulsed lasers.

Mobile Phone Based Fluorescence Multi-Well Plate Reader

UCLA researchers have developed a novel mobile phone-based fluorescence multi-well plate reader.

Cochlear Implant Enhanced by a Penetrating Auditory Nerve Electrode

State of the art cochlear implants improve hearing in deaf people, but show poor sensitivity to the fine timing of sounds. UCI researchers have developed a penetrating auditory nerve electrode which can directly stimulate the auditory nerve and increase the sensitivity of a cochlear implant.

Compact Voltage Sensor For Power-Lines

Power-lines for the distribution and transmission of high-voltage electricity are ubiquitous infrastructure of modern societies. Convenient means exists for measuring the currents in these power-lines. However measuring the voltages between conductors of power-lines is difficult and costly because it typically requires large and expensive equipment due to the high voltages (which can be tens or hundreds of thousands of volts). To address that situation, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a novel, practical and inexpensive way to measure the conduct-to-conductor voltages of power-lines using components in just one conductor of overhead distribution and transmission power-lines. In addition to voltage, this technology can be augmented to measure current, power, and power flow directions. This Berkeley technology can also applied to power-lines in office buildings, factories and power substations.

Single Fiber-Based Multimodal Biophotonic Imaging and Spectroscopy Platform

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a highly flexible and reconfigurable optical imaging and spectroscopy platform.

Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based On Patterned Carbon Nanotube Ropes

This is a fabrication method for hydrogen gas sensors; these sensors have more rapid response times and are more sensitive than current detection techniques.

Wireless Communication Using Magnetic Waves in the Human Body

Medical devices and wearable consumer products have fundamental anatomically-driven size constraints that necessitate small form factors. Since most patients and consumers desire long battery life, and battery volume is limited by anatomy, one of the only ways to increase lifetime is to reduce the power of the underlying circuits. The power consumption of wireless communication circuits is often large, and while power can be minimized by restricting the communication distance to just a few meters from sensor nodes to a personal base station as part of a body-area network (BAN), it can still dominate the overall energy budget of a wearable device. Current human body communication (HBC) systems communicate using capacitive electrodes that are placed on the body and generate electric fields that then have fringing currents that travel through conductive biological tissues (in one embodiment – galvanic coupling) or fringing fields that interact with the surrounding environment (in another embodiment – capacitive coupling). Both techniques have slightly better path loss than conventional far-field RF techniques, but suffer from electrode impedance variation, environmental variation, or both, making the design of ultra-low power HBC systems difficult. Establishing methods that improve path gain and thus reduced power consumption will aid the functionality of industry devices greatly. 

Novel Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Fungal Nanopillared Surface

Medical devices are susceptible to contamination by harmful microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, which form biofilms on device surfaces. These biofilms are often resistant to antibiotics and other current treatments, resulting in over 2 million people per year suffering from diseases related to these contaminating microbes. Death rates for many of these diseases are high, often exceeding 50%. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel anti-bacterial and anti-fungal biocomposite that incorporates a nanopillared surface structure that can be applied as a coating to medical devices.

A Hybrid Silicon Laser-Quantum Well Intermixing Wafer Bonded Integration Platform

An approach for integrating InP-based photonic devices together with low loss silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics.

Combined Individual Nanomaterial Enhancements for Total X-Ray Enhancement

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to combine individual nanomaterial enhancements to achieve greater X-ray enhancement.

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