Learn more about UC TechAlerts – Subscribe to categories and get notified of new UC technologies

Browse Category: Sensors & Instrumentation > Analytical

Categories

[Search within category]

Accelerating palladium nanowire hydrogen sensors using engineered nanofiltration layers

Researchers at UCI have developed a method for enhancing existing hydrogen gas sensors, leading to as much as a 20-fold improvement in sensor response and recovery times.

Simple Low Cost Micro Pre-Concentrator for Gathering Gas-Phase Samples

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a device for measuring preconcentration of gas samples, particularly involving detection using aerial systems.

Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based On Patterned Carbon Nanotube Ropes

This is a fabrication method for hydrogen gas sensors; these sensors have more rapid response times and are more sensitive than current detection techniques.

Portable Breath Sampler for Diagnostic Testing

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a portable, human exhaled breath sample collector for use in breath tests.

High-Throughput And Label-Free Single Nanoparticle Sizing Based On Time-Resolved On-Chip Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a rapid, low-cost, and label-free methodology for nanoparticle sizing.

Rapid, Portable And Cost-Effective Yeast Cell Viability And Concentration Analysis Using Lensfree On-Chip Microscopy And Machine Learning

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a new portable device to rapidly measure yeast cell viability and concentration using a lab-on-chip design.

Mechanical Process For Creating Particles Using Two Plates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Physics and Astronomy have developed a novel method to lithograph two polished solid surfaces by using a simple mechanical alignment jig with piezoelectric control and a method of pressing them together and solidifying a material.

Digital Droplet Microflowmetry Enabled By Interfacial Instability

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a non-thermal, digital microfluidic flowmeter with the ability to measure ultralow flow rates.

Robust Visual-Inertial Sensor Fusion For Navigation, Localization, Mapping, And 3D Reconstruction

UCLA researchers in the Computer Science Department have invented a novel model for a visual-inertial system (VINS) for navigation, localization, mapping, and 3D reconstruction applications.

Dsp-Sift: Domain-Size Pooling For Image Descriptors For Image Matching And Other Applications

UCLA researchers in the Computer Science Department have invented a novel modification to the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm that shows significant improvement for computer vision applications.

Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Sensors for Probing the Action of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a genetically encoded fluorescent sensor toolbox for the probing of G-protein coupled receptors.

Nanowire Building Block

Nanowires have applications as transistors or bioelectronic devices. Current methods to synthesize nanowires lack the ability to precisely control length, sequence, and terminal functionality. Using this invention as a building block, organic nanowires can be made with controlled length, sequence, and terminal functionality. The organic nanowires made with this invention also exhibit zero-resistance and do not degrade with increased length.

Soluble Fluorescent DNA Label

Assays or biosensors that utilize electrochemical or fluorescent techniques often employ DNA electrochemical probes. Current probes have drawbacks, as they have either electronic or fluorescent properties, are not readily water-soluble, and are poorly coupled within a DNA strand. This invention is a DNA electrochemical probe that has both electronic and fluorescent properties, is water-soluble, and can readily incorporate into a DNA strand.

Customized Rheometer Tools By Three Dimensional Printing

Professor Mason and colleagues from UCLA’s Departments of Physics and Chemistry have developed a fast and inexpensive method of fabricating customized tools for rheological analysis.

Enhanced Cell/Bead Encapsulation Via Acoustic Focusing

The invention consists of a multi-channel, droplet-generating microfluidic device with a strategically placed feature. The feature vibrates in order to counteract particle-trapping micro-vortices formed in the device. Counteracting these vortices allows for single particle encapsulation in the droplets formed by the device and makes this technology a good candidate for use in single cell diagnostics and drug delivery systems.

Micro-preconcentrators for Gas Sampling

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a miniature and low power concentration device for trace gas samples.

Micro-Glassblown 3-D Coriolis Vibratory MEMS Gyroscope

Micro-glassblowing batch fabrication process for 3-D MEMS gyroscope

Wearable Monitoring System Better Understands Autism Spectrum Disorder

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a wearable monitoring system to better understand the emotional dysregulation that an individual with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may encounter.

Continuous, enhanced detection of droplet contents in electrical impedance spectroscopy

The inventors at UCI have developed a method and system to make enhanced electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in a continuously flowing train of microfluidic droplets. The technique increases the sensitivity of the electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements, lowering detection limits and increasing the frequency of continuous measurements.

Highly Wrinkled Metal Thin Films Using Lift-Off Layers

Wearable electronics are becoming a popular way of integrating personal healthcare with continuous, remote health monitoring, yet current devices are bulky and exhibit poor electronic performance. Wrinkled metal thin films can be utilized for their thin, flexible profiles, which conform well to the skin. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel method using specialized materials that results in wrinkled metal thin films that have enhanced mechanical and electrical performance.

Energy Efficient Trigger Word Detection via Accelerometer Data

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an energy-efficient voice monitoring technique for smart devices, such as smartphones and wearables, based on accelerometer data.

An Optical System for Parallel Acquisition of Raman Spectra from a 2-Dimensional Laser Beam Array

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method for acquiring Raman spectra from a plurality of laser interrogation spots in a two-dimensional array. This method can be used for parallel analysis of individual cells or for fast chemical imaging of specimens.

MyShake: Earth Quake Early Warning System Based on Smartphones

Earthquakes are unpredictable disasters. Earthquake early warning (EEW) systems have the potential to mitigate this unpredictability by providing seconds to minutes of warning. This warning could enable people to move to safe zones, and machinery (such as mass transit trains) to be slowed or shutdown. The several EEW systems operating around the world use conventional seismic and geodetic network infrastructure – that only exist in a few nations. However, the proliferation of smartphones – which contain accelerometers that could potentially detect earthquakes – offers an opportunity to create EEW systems without the need to build expensive infrastructure. To take advantage of this smartphone opportunity, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a technology to allow earthquake alerts to be issued based on detecting earthquakes underway using the sensors in smartphones. Called MyShake, this EEW system has been shown to record magnitude 5 earthquakes at distances of 10 km or less. MyShake incorporates an on-phone detection capability to distinguish earthquakes from every-day shakes. The UC Berkeley technology also collects earthquake data at a central site where a network detection algorithm confirms that an earthquake is underway as well as estimates the location and magnitude in real-time. This information can then be used to issue an alert of forthcoming ground shaking. Additionally, the seismic waveforms recorded by MyShake could be used to deliver rapid microseism maps, study impacts on buildings, and possibly image shallow earth structure and earthquake rupture kinematics.

Adaptive optics with direct wavefront sensing for multi-photon microscope

Biological tissue are rarely transparent, presenting major challenges for deep tissue optical microscopy. With the advantages of high-resolution and viewing of live organisms, optical microscopy has become an important tool for biological research and continues to open new avenues in its capabilities. In recent years, image resolution and speed has been dramatically improved.  However the improvement of the resolution and penetration depth for optical microscopy is still in its infancy. As light passes through biological tissue, it can be absorbed, refracted and scattered, limiting the resolution and depth of optical imaging in biological tissues. Overcoming these challenges will benefit a wide range of applications from basic biological research to clinical investigations.

An Ultra-Sensitive Method for Detecting Molecules

To-date, plasmon detection methods have been utilized in the life sciences, electrochemistry, chemical vapor detection, and food safety. While passive surface plasmon resonators have lead to high-sensitivity detection in real time without further contaminating the environment with labels. Unfortunately, because these systems are passively excited, they are intrinsically limited by a loss of metal, which leads to decreased sensitivity. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a novel method to detect distinct molecules in air under normal conditions to achieve sub-parts per billion detection limits, the lowest limit reported. This device can be used detecting a wide array of molecules including explosives or bio molecular diagnostics utilizing the first instance of active plasmon sensor, free of metal losses and operating deep below the diffraction limit for visible light.  This novel detection method has been shown to have superior performance than monitoring the wavelength shift, which is widely used in passive surface plasmon sensors. 

  • Go to Page: