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Sparse 3D Holographic Spatio-Temporal Focusing

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Several techniques are available to trigger neural activity in brain tissue on demand which are needed to study how the brain exchanges and processes information, which is useful in research and treatment applications.  The most promising solutions are all optical. Brain cells are modified with bio-compatible engineered proteins making ion-specific channels located at the neurons' cell membrane photosensitive. At this point, external triggering of action-potentials with light becomes possible.  What is needed are instruments and methods that provide specificity, improve spatial and temporal resolution, are non-invasive and bio-compatible, provide high speed and low delay, have large operating volumes.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed a new system and methods that meet the above qualities.  This new technology enables all-optical activation of individual neurons in live brain tissue and can narrowly concentrate light on individual neurons anywhere within a large 3D volume. The invention enables precise triggering of action-potentials with single neuron spatial resolution in the entire volume of interest, offering a significant improvement over existing technology.  The technology can be used as an add-on system in the optical path in a commercial microscope.  

Mechano-Nps (Node Pore Sensing)

The mechanical properties of cells derive from the structure and dynamics of their intracellular components, including the cytoskeleton, cell membrane, nucleus, and other organelles.  These, in turn, emerge from cell specific genetic, epigenetic, and biochemical programs, providing a link between cellular mechanics and the underlying molecular state.  Differences in mechanical properties reflect on cellular properties with clinical implications, including the metastatic potential, cell-cycle stage, and differentiation state of cells.  Yet, many mechanical aspects of various cells and sub-cell organelles remain unknown due to absence of appropriate analysis platforms. Atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and micropipette aspiration are the gold standards for performing mechanical measurements of cells, as they both provide controlled loading conditions and quantify such cellular properties as elastic modulus and cortical tension.  They are, however, burdened by slow throughput, capable of analyzing only just a few cells/hr.  Likewise, optical tweezers and microplate rheometry also suffer from low throughput.  Various microfluidic based platforms have been proposed for the high-throughput mechanical analysis of cells, including hydrodynamic stretching cytometry, suspended microchannel resonators (SMR), and real-time deformability cytometry (RT-DC).  Although each of these methods can analyze populations of cells in a relatively short time, they focus only on a single cellular property.  Consequently, these platforms, and the low-throughput traditional methods that under-sample, can neither identify cellular heterogeneity nor classify mechanical sub-phenotypes within a population. Investigators at UC Berkeley have developed a microfluidic platform, “mechano-node-pore sensing” (mechano-NPS), a rapid and multi-parametric cell screening platform, that simultaneously quantifies cell diameter, transit time through a contraction channel, transverse deformation under constant strain, and recovery time after deformation.  This platform efficiently reveals malignant-dependent mechanical phenotypes of cancer and normal epithelial cells, discriminates between sub-lineages of cells with accuracy comparable to flow cytometry, and determines the effects of chronological age and malignant progression on cell elasticity and recovery from deformation – based solely on a cell’s mechanical properties.

Voltage-Sensitive Dyes In Living Cells

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Comprehensively mapping and recording the electrical inputs and outputs of multiple neurons simultaneously with cellular spatial resolution and millisecond time resolution remains an outstanding challenge in the field of neurobiology. Traditionally, electrophysiology is used to directly measure membrane potential changes. While this technique yields sensitive results, it is invasive and only permits single-cell recording.  VoltageFluor dyes rely on photoinduced electron transfer to effectively report membrane potential changes in cells. This approach allows for fast, sensitive and non-invasive recording of neuronal activity in cultured mammalian neurons and in ex-vivo tissue slices. However, one major limitation of small-molecule dye imaging is the inability to target the dye to specific cells of interest.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed latent voltage sensitive dyes that require a fluorogenic activation step. This new class of VoltageFluor dyes are only weakly fluorescent until being activated in defined cell types via biological processes. In particular, the VoltageFluor dyes described herein comprise a bioreversible group that quenches the fluorescence of the VoltageFluor dye, that upon selective removal by the action of biological processes (e.g., enzymes) thereby activates the fluorescence of the VoltageFluor dye. The researchers found that the new dye facilitated the observation of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal neurons.  

Simple And Low-Cost Pseudo-Halbach Magnets For NMR

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy exploits the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei to determine the physical and chemical properties of the substances in which they are contained. It can provide detailed information about the structure, dynamics, reaction state, and chemical environment of molecules, where the magnetic field is used to polarize atomic nuclei prior to detection of their signals. In conventional NMR magnet design, the homogeneity of the field is a principal consideration and should be made as uniform as possible to obtain the most informative results and best data quality. Researchers from UC Berkeley have developed an assembly of magnetized prisms with an orientation pattern to generate the strongest available magnetic field.  The design is based on the priority of achieving the strongest available field over a given volume irrespective of the homogeneity.  The team has designed and made a compact 2 T magnet to fulfil these objectives.

RNA-directed Cleavage and Modification of DNA using CasY (CRISPR-CasY)

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The CRISPR-Cas system is now understood to confer bacteria and archaea with acquired immunity against phage and viruses. CRISPR-Cas systems consist of Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a CRISPR array, which includes direct repeats flanking short spacer sequences that guide Cas proteins to their targets.  Class 2 CRISPR-Cas are streamlined versions in which a single Cas protein bound to RNA is responsible for binding to and cleavage of a targeted sequence. The programmable nature of these minimal systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology that is revolutionizing the field of genome manipulation.  Current CRISPR Cas technologies are based on systems from cultured bacteria, leaving untapped the vast majority of organisms that have not been isolated.  There is a need in the art for additional Class 2 CRISPR/Cas systems (e.g., Cas protein plus guide RNA combinations).     UC Berkeley researchers discovered a new type of Cas protein, CasY.  CasY is short compared to previously identified CRISPR-Cas endonucleases, and thus use of this protein as an alternative provides the advantage that the nucleotide sequence encoding the protein is relatively short.  CasY utilizes a guide RNA to perform double stranded cleavage of DNA. The researchers introduced CRISPR-CasY into E. coli, finding that they could block genetic material introduced into the cell.  Further research results indicated that CRISPR-CasY operates in a manner analogous to CRISPR-Cas9, but utilizing an entirely distinct protein architecture containing different catalytic domains.   CasY is also expected to function under different conditions (e.g., temperature) given the environment of the organisms that CasY was expressed in.  Similar to CRISPR Cas9, CasY enzymes are expected to have a wide variety of applications in genome editing and nucleic acid manipulation.   

RNA-directed Cleavage and Modification of DNA using CasX (CRISPR-CasX)

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The CRISPR-Cas system is now understood to confer bacteria and archaea with acquired immunity against phage and viruses. CRISPR-Cas systems consist of Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a CRISPR array, which includes direct repeats flanking short spacer sequences that guide Cas proteins to their targets.  Class 2 CRISPR-Cas are streamlined versions in which a single Cas protein bound to RNA is responsible for binding to and cleavage of a targeted sequence. The programmable nature of these minimal systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology that is revolutionizing the field of genome manipulation.  Current CRISPR Cas technologies are based on systems from cultured bacteria, leaving untapped the vast majority of organisms that have not been isolated.  There is a need in the art for additional Class 2 CRISPR/Cas systems (e.g., Cas protein plus guide RNA combinations).   UC Berkeley researchers discovered a new type of Cas protein, CasX, from groundwater samples. CasX is short compared to previously identified CRISPR-Cas endonucleases, and thus use of this protein as an alternative provides the advantage that the nucleotide sequence encoding the protein is relatively short.  CasX utilizes a tracrRNA and a guide RNA to perform double stranded cleavage of DNA. The researchers introduced CRISPR-CasX into E. coli, finding that they could block genetic material introduced into the cell.  Further research results indicated that CRISPR-CasX operates in a manner analogous to CRISPR-Cas9, but utilizing an entirely distinct protein architecture containing different catalytic domains.   CasX is also expected to function under different conditions (e.g., temperature) given the environment of the organisms that CasX was expressed in.  Similar to CRISPR Cas9, CasX enzymes are expected to have a wide variety of applications in genome editing and nucleic acid manipulation. 

Coordinative Alignment Of Molecules In Chiral Metal Organic Frameworks

Single-crystal x-ray diffraction is a powerful technique for the definitive identification of chemical structures.  Although most molecules and molecular complexes can be crystallized, often enthalpic and entropic factors introduce orientational disorder that prevent determination of a high-resolution structure.  Several strategies based on the inclusion of guests in a host framework that helps maintain molecular orientation have been used to overcome this challenge.  However, most of these methods rely primarily on weak interactions to induce crystalline order of the included molecules. Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a strategy for crystallization of molecules within the pores of chiral metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) using coordinative bonding, which includes covalent and ionic bonds, and/or using chirality.  

MEMS-Based Mirror Array For Optical Beam Forming And Steering

Self-driving cars, drones, robots and other autonomous systems rely on various sensors for obstacle detection and avoidance to navigate safely through environments. One of the most common methods to sense obstacles is light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which uses light in the form of a pulsed (or amplitude/frequency modulated CW) laser to measure variable distances. These light pulses—combined with other data recorded by the airborne system— generate precise, three-dimensional information about the shape of the surrounding environment and its surface characteristics. While LiDAR is a well established and utilized system within many mobility companies, it’s large size and high cost-per-unit has prevented its implementation in many commercial applications. Solid state LiDARs with non-mechanical scanning elements have received increasing interests. In particular, the optical phased array (OPA) provides non-mechanical scanning in a compact form factor. More importantly, at reduced size OPAs enable sophisticated beamforming such as simultaneous scanning, pointing, and tracking of multiple objects, or even direct line-of-sight communications. Unfortunately, at large-scale OPAs have been found to have slow response times, making their application for commercial use impossible. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have designed an optical phased array with rapid response time. This novel technology utilizes arrays of micromirrors actuated by micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). This novel OPA operates with a larger field of view, with a wide range of laser wavelengths, and without the need for high voltage electronics. It is also far more compact and sophisticated than bulky and intrusive mechanical LIDAR technologies.

System And Methods To Test Autonomous And Automated Cars By Using Virtual Reality And Augmented Reality

Rigorous testing and validation is essential for the deployment of autonomous and semi-autonomous vehicle technologies. The main objective of this process is to evaluate the performance and safety of the system under various operating conditions. For semiautonomous systems that assist the driver, this process also aims to evaluate the response of the human operator to the active safety system and the resulting closed-loop behavior. Consequently, the testing process must satisfy the following requirements:1. The traffic environment (including but not limited to other vehicles, pedestrians and traffic elements such as stop signs, stoplights and crosswalks) must be easily reconfigurable.2. The human operator must be provided with realistic feedback about the motion of the vehicle being tested.Today, this process is done via hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulations and testing on proving grounds. In HIL simulations, the dynamics and motion of the controlled vehicle are simulated using a computer program, often in conjunction with a vehicle motion simulator. However, advanced simulators are expensive and unable to accurately capture the complexity of the physical vehicle system. Proving ground tests on an actual car at facilities such as MCity at the University of Michigan alleviate this issue. However, the traffic environments at such facilities are not flexible, and are difficult and expensive to modify. Moreover, emergency scenarios such as sudden braking at high speeds are dangerous to test.Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a novel and effective way of testing autonomous and semi-autonomous vehicles. The system consists of a real vehicle with a human driver, operating in a reconfigurable virtual environment. An immersive visualization of the virtual environment is created via Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR). This system takes information of the position of the vehicle and the head pose of the driver, propagates the virtual environment forward in time using dynamical models and updates the visualization in VR/AR interface in real-time. The actuation of the car can be modified by the driver or by the software on the vehicle.

Direct Optical Visualization Of Graphene On Transparent Substrates

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The ∼10% optical contrast of graphene on specialized substrates like oxide-capped silicon substrates, together with the high-throughput and noninvasive features of optical microscopy, have greatly facilitated the use and research of graphene research for the past decade.  However, substantially lower contrast is obtained on transparent substrates. Visualization of nanoscale defects in graphene, e.g., voids, cracks, wrinkles, and multilayers, formed during either growth or subsequent transfer and fabrication steps, represents yet another level of challenge for most device substrates.     UC Berkeley researchers have developed a facile, label-free optical microscopy method to directly visualize graphene on transparent inorganic and polymer substrates at 30−40% image contrast per graphene layer.  Their noninvasive approach overcomes typical challenges associated with transparent substrates, including insulating and rough surfaces, enables unambiguous identification of local graphene layer numbers and reveals nanoscale structures and defects with outstanding contrast and throughput. We thus demonstrate in situ monitoring of nanoscale defects in graphene, including the generation of nano-cracks under uniaxial strain, at up to 4× video rate.  

RF-Powered Micromechanical Clock Generator

Realizing the potential of massive sensor networks requires overcoming cost and power challenges. When sleep/wake strategies can adequately limit a network node's sensor and wireless power consumption, then the power limitation comes down to the real-time clock (RTC) that synchronizes sleep/wake cycles. With typical RTC battery consumption on the order of 1µW, a low-cost printed battery with perhaps 1J of energy would last about 11 days. However, if a clock could bleed only 10nW from this battery, then it would last 3 years. To attain such a clock, researchers at UC Berkeley developed a mechanical circuit that harnesses squegging to convert received RF energy (at -58dBm) into a local clock while consuming less than 17.5nW of local battery power. The Berkeley design dispenses with the conventional closed-loop positive feedback approach to realize an RCT (along with its associated power consumption) and removes the need for a sustaining amplifier altogether. 

Pseudo Light-Field Display

Creating correct focus cues (blur and accommodation) has become a critical issue in the development of the next generation of 3D displays, particularly head-mounted displays.  Withough correct focus cues, current 3D displays create undue visual discomfort and reduce visual performance.  Current attempts to solve the focus cues problem are limited in their practical use.  For example, volumetric displays are limited because the viewable scene is restricted to the size of the display volume.  Multi-plane displays require very accurate alignment between the display and the viewer’s eyes.  Light field displays often require demanding resolution requirements and computational workload.   Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a system and method to correct focus cues with a conventional display, a dynamic lens in front of each eye, and a method to measure the current focus or an estimate of the current focus of each eye.  Most of the system components are currently commercially available and the technology solves the speed and resolution problems in current light field displays. 

Shaped Piezoelectric Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Device

Piezoelectric Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (pMUTs) have attracted industry attention for their good acoustic matching, small geometry, low cost-by-batch fabrication, and compatibilities with CMOS and consumer electronics. While planar pMUTs have reasonable performance over bulk piezoelectric transducers, certain deficits remain in terms of coupling and acoustic pressure outputs, DC displacements, bandwidth, and power consumption. To address these deficiencies, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a next generation of shaped pMUTs which are no longer fully defined by resonance frequency and can accommodate larger pressure outputs and bandwidths. This new pMUT apparatus can significantly boost overall performance while dramatically reducing power as compared to flat diaphragm state-of-the-art pMUTs.

Optical Phase Retrieval Systems Using Color-Multiplexed Illumination

Light is a wave, having both an amplitude and phase. Our eyes and cameras, however, only see real values (i.e. intensity), so cannot measure phase directly. Phase is important, especially in biological imaging, where cells are typically transparent (i.e. invisible) but yet impose phase delays. When we can measure the phase delays, we get back important shape and density maps.   Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a new method for recovering both phase and amplitude of an arbitrary sample in an optical microscope from a single image, using patterned partially coherent illumination. The hardware requirements are compatible with most modern microscopes via a simple condenser insert, or by replacing the entire illumination pathway with a programmable LED array, providing flexibility, portability, and affordability, while eliminating many of the trade-offs required by other methods. This enables quantitative imaging of phase from a single image, using partially coherent illumination, and in a way that is flexible and amenable to a variety of existing microscopy systems. 

Software for Optimal Presentation Of Imagery On Multi-Plane Displays

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} UC Berkeley researchers developed a software for displaying three-dimensional imagery of general scenes with nearly correct focus cues on multi-plane displays.  These displays present an additive combination of images at a discrete set of optical distances, allowing the viewer to focus at different distances in the simulated scene. The software uses an optimization algorithm to compute the images to be displayed on the presentation planes so that the retinal images, when accommodating to different distances, match the corresponding retinal images of the input scene as closely as possible.  The researchers demonstrated the utility of the technique using imagery acquired from both synthetic and real-world scenes, and analyzed the system’s characteristics including bounds on achievable resolution and found this software improves the practicality and realism of 3D displays by enabling realistic focus cues to be reproduced.  

System and Methods to Track Single Molecules

Tracking single molecules inside cells reveals the dynamics of biological processes, including receptor trafficking, signaling and cargo transport. However, individual molecules often cannot be resolved inside cells due to their high density in the cellular environment, plus it is difficult to see spatial and temporal features, such as signal transduction events at the cell surface or on intracellular compartments, with single molecule resolution. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed the PhotoGate device and methods in order to control the number of fluorescent particles in a region of interest. By deploying PhotoGate and applying patterned photobleaching, they have demonstrated the tracking of single particles at surface densities two orders of magnitude higher than the single-molecule detection limit. Additional experimentation enabled the observation of ligand-induced dimerization of epidermal growth factor receptors on a live cell membrane, and also measurements of the binding and the dissociation rate of single adaptor protein from early endosomes in the crowded environment of the cytoplasm. The innovative approach enables tracking of single particles at high spatial and temporal resolution, and for mapping of molecular trajectories, as well as determining complex stoichiometry and dynamics, and drives the art towards video-rate imaging of live cells with molecular (1–5 nm) resolution.

Apparatus and Method for 2D-based Optoelectronic Imaging

The use of electric fields for signaling and manipulation is widespread, mediating systems spanning the action potentials of neuron and cardiac cells to battery technologies and lab-on-a-chip devices. Current FET- and dye-based techniques to detect electric field effects are systematically difficult to scale, costly, or perturbative. Researchers at the University of California Berkeley have developed an optical detection platform, based on the unique optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials that permits high-resolution imaging of electric fields, voltage, acidity, strain and bioelectric action potentials across a wide field-of-view.

Atom Probe Tomography Method and Algorithm

Most cluster analysis parameters in atom probe tomography (APT) are selected ad hoc. This can often lead to data misinterpretation and misleading results by instrument technicians and researchers. Moreover, arbitrary cluster parameters can have suboptimal consequences on data quality and integrity, leading to inefficiencies for downstream data users. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a framework and specific cluster analysis methods to efficiently extract knowledge from better APT data. By using parameter selection protocols with theoretical explanations, this technology allows for a more optimized and robust multivariate statistical analysis technique from the start, thus improving the quality of analysis and outcomes for both upstream and downstream data users.

Dry-Eye Formulation

The sensation of ocular discomfort commonly referred to as “dry eye” can be caused by various factors. The principal causative factors are (a) increased tear-evaporation rates attributable to meibomian gland dysfunction and insufficient/unbalanced tear-lipid films; (b) inadequate tear-aqueous production attributable to aging, medical procedures performed on the cornea (e.g., LASIK), or other general health conditions (e.g., autoimmune diseases); (c) environmental irritants (e.g., dust, smoke, wind, sun, or low humidity); and (d) eye strain attributable to extended viewing of computer monitors or other working environment-related factors. There are many different artificial-eye drops marketed and prescribed or recommended by medical practitioners to decrease dry-eye sensations. Unfortunately, all provide only short-term or no effects at all on tear-film stability and evaporation rates. Moreover, many artificial-tear formulations contain petrochemicals, (e.g., mineral oil) which have nothing in common with natural lipids comprising human tear-lipid films and might be potentially harmful to the eye.   Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed bicontinuous microemulsion formulations capable of delivering the components necessary to counteract compromised stability of tear-lipid layers and thus enhance the stability of entire tear films. These bicontinuous microemulsion components disperse spontaneously into a physical state that makes the microemulsion completely miscible with both human tear aqueous and human tear lipids. The components of these microemulsions are chemically identical or very close to natural tear lipids and tear aqueous and thus are completely biocompatible with human tear films. The lipids used in this formulation are biodegradable, and human tear enzymes will be able to metabolize these bicontinuous microemulsion lipids.  

Superresolution Microscopy And Ultrahigh-Throughput Spectroscopy

Current super-resolution microscopy (SRM) methods have excellent spatial resolution, but no spectral information. Issues such as heavy color crosstalk, compromised image quality, and difficulties in aligning 3D coordinates of different color channels mean that high-quality multicolor 3D SRM remains a challenge. Another current imaging technique, single-molecule spectroscopy, is also limited in use because current methods are low throughput, have low spatial resolution, and cannot be used effectively for densely labeled biological samples.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed a 3-D super-resolution microscopy and single molecule spectroscopy system that addresses the issues inherent to both of these imaging techniques. By synchronously measuring the fluorescence spectra and positions of millions of single molecules within minutes, both spectrally resolved SRM and ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy are made possible.

A New Method For Improving 3-D Depth Perception

The ability to see depth is a key visual function, as three-dimensional vision is used to guide body movements. Although many visual cues are used to infer spatial relationships, depth perception relies primarily on stereopsis, or the perception of depth based on differences in the images in the two eyes. More than 5% of the US population, however, is unable to see in three dimensions due to stereo-blindness and stereo-anomaly. Without depth perception, basic activities such as catching a ball or driving a car are not possible. Current therapeutic methods to address this issue include a set of eye-training exercises that aim to equalize the input from the eyes to the brain, which are collectively called orthoptics.   Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed an orthoptic method to train stereo depth perception. This method includes devices and systems for implementation, and it can be used in the home. 

Compressive Plenoptic Imaging

Better understanding the brain's architecture and the behavior of neural networks requires non-invasive probes capable of monitoring brain activity at the scale of individual neurons.  Functional neuro-imaging methods have the advantage of being minimally invasive and can potentially resolve individual action potentials.  An ideal imaging method would be capable of quantifying many neurons simultaneously, have high spatial and temporal resolution, be non-invasive, and be accurate even in deep layers of brain tissue. There are a variety of current techniques available, many of which use mechanical scanning to reduce the effects of optical scattering and therefore have low temporal resolution. UC Berkeley researchers have developed a device capable of quantitative functional neuro-imaging in the thick brain tissue of live animals. By combining a detection method with algorithmic data processing, this device achieves single neuron resolution and fast sampling rates with high spatial and temporal resolution.  

Image-guided Improvements for High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Systems

High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) involves minimally-invasive or non-invasive methods to direct acoustic energy into the body. HIFU is typically performed with real-time imaging (e.g. ultrasound or MRI) to enable the treatment targets and monitoring. One problem relates to weaknesses in therapy precision, which experts attribute to poor image acquisition and quality used for HIFU therapy guidance. Another problem factors the current MRI hardware apparatus which are generally not compatible with HIFU systems. To address these problems, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed new highly sensitive coil hardware to fill the current performance gap. The experimental team has demonstrated an ultra-thin (e.g., less than 0.1 mm) coil package which is compatible and nearly invisible to typical MR-guided HIFU systems.

Screen-printed Flexible MRI Receive Coils

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive non-ionizing radiation imaging modality, providing excellent image contrast of soft tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging is an inherently signal-to-noise-starved technique that limits the spatial resolution, diagnostic image quality and results in typically long acquisition times that are prone to motion artifacts. This limitation is exacerbated when receive coils have poor fit due to lack of flexibility or need for padding for patient comfort. To address these problems, researchers at UC Berkeley have taken a new approach that uses printing for fabricating receive coils. This approach enables highly flexible, extremely lightweight conforming devices which exhibit similar to higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional ones, in clinical scenarios when coils could be displaced more than 18 mm away from the body. Prototype arrays have been incorporated within infant blankets for in vivo studies. This work presents the first fully functional, printed coils for 1.5- and 3-T clinical scanners.

Low Capacitance/High Speed Bipolar Phototransistor

The performance of optoelectronic links is very strongly related to the sensitivity of the detector on the receiver end. Conventional receivers include a photodiode whose signal is sent to amplifiers until it is strong enough to be used in microelectronic circuits. The energy cost of amplification is very high and could be significantly reduced if the capacitance of the photodiode and first stage of amplification were smaller. In order to be useful for this application, a phototransistor must have several features: - Low capacitance - High speed - Large photon absorption volume Unfortunately, for conventional bipolar phototransistors, these requirements are contradictory. Indeed the photon absorption length in typical semiconductors is on the order of microns, while the speed requirement only allows transit regions for amplified carriers of a few tens of nanometers at best. This is over a 100x size mismatch. Increasing any other dimension (that is not the transit direction) results in prohibitively high capacitances. This invention offers a solution to these issues consisting of a new kind of semiconductor phototransistor device, which integrates a large PIN-photodiode with a bipolar junction transistor (or Heterojunction Bipolar transistor). 

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