Available Technologies

No technologies match these criteria.
Schedule UC TechAlerts to receive an email when technologies are published that match this search. Click on the Save Search link above

Find technologies available for licensing from all ten University of California (UC) campuses.

Photo-Rechargeable Antibacterial/Antiviral Materials

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to incorporate and enhance photo-induced biocidal functions on compounds, polymers, fibers, films, and textiles for daylight-driven rechargeable antibacterial and antivirus applications such as personal protective clothing, food packaging materials and medical devices.

dCas9 Epigenome Editing Toolkit

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a dCas9 toolkit for human epigenome editing.

Generation of Novel Genomic Tools for Use in the Normalization of Endogeneous RNA Expression Between Different Samples

Genome searching tools are a growing field within the medical and biological research communities. There are now a large number of companies offering services relating to understanding genetic information, and typical laboratory functional genomic assays produce a range of data, including sequencing of transcription factors and regulatory regions. Researchers routinely search over 1,417 functional genomic datasets that are publically available, and users have a range of tools to search the data, including many online. Genetic information requires further processing to become biologically meaningful and a pressing challenge is to effectively search functional genomic data and new tools and processes are needed for searching genomic information.

SPARK (Separation of Phases-based Activity Reporter of Kinase)” A Genetically-encoded Fluorescent Reporter Platform for Studying Cell Signaling in Living Cells

This novel class of genetically-encoded fluorescent reporters can be used as powerful tools to study protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in living cells. These bright, reversible reporters have a large dynamic range and fast kinetics, demonstrating significant advantages over traditional FRET-based fluorescent reporters.

Au(III) Complexes For [18F] Trifluoromethylation

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The biological properties of trifluoromethyl compounds (e.g, CF3) have led to their ubiquity in pharmaceuticals, yet their chemical properties have made their preparation a substantial challenge, necessitating innovative chemical solutions.  For example, strong, non-interacting C-F bonds lend metabolic stability while simultaneously limiting the ability of chemical transformations to forge the relevant linkages and install the CF3 unit.  When these same synthetic considerations are extended toward the synthesis of trifluoromethylated positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, the situation becomes more complex.   UC Berkeley researchers discovered an unusual alternative mechanism, in which borane abstracts fluoride from the CF3 group in a gold complex. The activated CF2 fragment can then bond to a wide variety of other carbon substituents added to the same gold center. Return of the fluoride liberates a trifluoromethylated compound from the metal. This mechanism would be useful for the introduction of radioactive fluoride substituents for potential tracers to be used for positron emission tomography applications.

Near-Realistic Sports Motion Analysis and Activity Monitoring

UCLA researchers in the Department of Computer Science have developed a new technology to fight the growing obesity epidemic by encouraging exercise in video games.

Methods and Compositions for Selective Testing of Mammalian Proteomics From Mixed Biological Environments

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Studies of heterochronic parabiosis (surgical joining of young and old animals) suggest both productive tissue repair and the key signal transduction pathways that control stem cell activation are restored to ‘youth’ in the old parabionts by young systemic factors.  It would be beneficial from academic and clinical stand-points to determine which proteins in tissues of parabiotically connected animals are derived from the circulation of young versus old partner. Such a database of systemic proteins that end up in specific tissues would suggest potentially rejuvenating (young blood) and inhibitory (old blood) molecules with direct effects in a given tissue. While biochemical fractionation of serum and plasma can provide some characterization of the molecular differences between young and old circulatory milieu, this technique is fraught with the risk of missing proteins that act in complexes with each other and other macromolecules. UC Berkeley researchers have discovered methods and compositions that overcome these problems by relying on tRNA synthase that specifically recognizes and incorporates Bio-Orthogonal Non-Canonical Amino acid Tagging (“BONCAT”) into proteins. To facilitate detection by proteomics, we have selected the BONCAT method over the cell type-specific labeling with amino acid precursors where proteomes are tagged with heavy isotope—labeled precursors; and over the incorporation of Met analogs azidohomoalanine and homopropargylglycine, which do not allow one to selectively profile young versus old proteomes in settings of parabiosis. The researchers have also developed a novel transgenic mouse strain which demonstrate the survival and vigor of these animals as well as the effective proteome labeling of cells in vitro and all examined tissues in vivo.

Nontoxic Alternatives to Phthalate Plasticizers

Phthalates are synthetic chemicals added to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to make flexible plastics. Due to health concerns, phthalates have been banned from children's products in the United States and Europe, but they are still used in a wide range of consumer products, including food wrap, medical devices, automotive parts, and building materials., chemicals that interfere with the body's hormone systems. Effects on wildlife of phthalates in the environment are also a concern. Phthalates are readily absorbed by the body through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. Phthalate exposure has been associated with reproductive and developmental abnormalities in animal studies. Epidemiological studies in humans also suggest that exposure to phthalates may have adverse health effects, including reproductive abnormalities that can lead to infertility. Phthalates are metabolized by the body into compounds that are considered endocrine disruptors. Because phthalates are not chemically bound to the PVC polymer, they tend to migrate out of plastic products and into the environment. The same is true of alternative plasticizers currently on the market. Dr. Rebecca Braslau’s laboratory has developed an approach to use compounds to replace phthalates that can be chemically attached to the PVC polymer chain: “internal plasticizers.”