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Producing Antioxidants, Sugars and Protein-Rich Components from Agricultural Byproducts

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a process for extracting high-value components from nut and fruit waste products.

Motion-Corrected, Optical Imaging of Biological Tissue

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a system that displays a real-time image - generated from optical signals - of biological tissue.

XYZeq – Spatially-Resolved Single Cell Sequencing

Researchers at UCSF have developed XYZeq, a method for coupling a cell’s spatial location with single-cell sequencing. Single-cell genomic techniques have emerged as powerful approaches to further our understanding of disease states and cellular heterogeneity. Single-cell imaging methods gain spatial information, but lack throughput and detailed transcriptomic information. Current single-cell sequencing approaches require dissociation of cells during preparation, as a result cannot record a cell’s physical location. UCSF researchers eliminate this step using XYZeq, a new scRNA-seq process that incorporates the benefits of single-cell imaging techniques with single-cell sequencing, without an imaging step. XYZeq simultaneously discerns the location and gene expression of a single cell residing within a complex tissue microenvironment. The technology has been validated in a laboratory setting.

Single Catheter System Combining Intravascular Ultrasound and Fiber-Based Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a catheter device that combines intravascular ultrasound with fluorescence lifetime imaging to better detect significant vascular conditions.

T cell Receptor cDNAs to Treat Gliomas

Brief description not available

Targeted Identification Of Rna Bases That Hydrogen Bond With Protein

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Natural Killer Cells with Enhanced Activity (SD 2021-141)

NK cells possess a native ability to kill tumors and virally infected cells without prior antigen priming. Furthermore, NK cells can be administered to patients across HLA allotypes, unlike T cells which require HLA matching to avoid graft-versus-host disease. Many trials utilizing adoptive transfer of allogeneic NK cells demonstrated complete remissions in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who are refractory to standard chemotherapy. Another recent clinical study demonstrated effective treatment of lymphoid malignancies using allogeneic CAR-expressing NK cells, with minimal side effects. Thus, NK cells possess a number of advantages over T cells that enables them to be used as safe, effective, “off-the-shelf” adoptive cell therapy product to treat diverse malignancies. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a key pathway that mediates natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity against antibody-opsonized target cells. This process helps mediate the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor antibodies. On NK cells, ADCC occurs via engagement of antibody-coated target cells with activating receptor leading to proinflammatory cytokine upregulation, degranulation, and target cell death. Upon cellular activation, the     is cleaved from the NK cell surface. Cleavage of the ectodomain prevents further antibody binding and signaling, which dampens NK cell activity. Blocking activation-induced cleavage has been previously demonstrated to augment ADCC activity and provides a novel strategy to improve efficacy of therapeutic antibodies in combination with adoptive transfer of engineered NK cells.