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Type III CRISPR-Cas System for Robust RNA Knockdown and Imaging in Eukaryotes

Type III CRISPR-Cas systems recognize and degrade RNA molecules using an RNA-guided mechanism that occurs widely in microbes for adaptive immunity against viruses. The inventors have demonstrated that this multi-protein system can be leveraged for programmable RNA knockdown of both nuclear and cytoplasmic transcripts in mammalian cells. Using single-vector delivery of the S. thermophilus Csm complex, RNA knockdown was achieved with high efficiency (90-99%) and minimal off-targets, outperforming existing technologies of shRNA- and Cas13-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, unlike Cas13, Csm is devoid of trans-cleavage activity and thus does not induce non-specific transcriptome-wide degradation and cytotoxicity. Catalytically inactivated Csm can also be used for programmable RNA-binding, which the inventors exploit for live-cell RNA imaging. This work demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of multi-subunit CRISPR-Cas effector complexes as RNA-targeting tools in eukaryotes.

Robotic Leaf Detection And Extraction System

Brief description not available

High Yield Method to Scale and Purify Full Length SARS-CoV-2 Membrane (M) Protein

Prof. Thomas Kuhlman at the University of California, Riverside has developed a high yield method to scale and purify native, full-length SARS-CoV-2 Membrane (M) protein.  This method may be utilized to scale the production and purification of M protein for research purposes.

Compositions and Methods for Treating Viral Infections

Researchers at the University of California, Davis (“UC Davis”) have developed methods for screening and targeting regions of viral genomes to identify drugs that inhibit the replication of RNA viruses.

(SD2022-010) Method for transmembrane protein semisynthesis and reconstitution in lipid membranes

Cellular lipid membranes are embedded with transmembrane proteins crucial to cell function. Elucidating membrane proteins’ diverse structures and biophysical mechanisms is increasingly necessary due to their growing prevalence as a therapeutic target and sheer ubiquity in cells. Most biophysical characterization strategies of transmembrane proteins rely on the tedious overexpression and isolation of recombinant proteins and their reconstitution in model phospholipid bilayers.Unfortunately, membrane protein reconstitution depends on the use of denaturing and unnatural detergents that can interfere with protein structure and function. We have developed a detergent‐free method to reconstitute transmembrane proteins in model phospholipid vesicles and GUVs. Additionally, transmembrane proteins are difficult to express in cells due to the extreme insolubility of their transmembrane domain. By incorporating a synthetic transmembrane peptide into liposomes and simply expressing soluble portions of transmembrane proteins in cells, we can use this semisynthetic ligation strategy to more easily construct functional transmembrane proteins and reconstitute them into liposomes for biophysical and biochemical studies.Inteins can be found contiguously or non contiguously within some proteins. Non‐contiguous inteins are called “split inteins”. Inteins can be thought of as a type of protein intron which splices itself out of proteins. When non‐contiguous inteins find and bind to each other, they are then able to excise themselves resulting in the ligation of their respective exteins. Split intein pairs (C‐intein and N‐intein) can be attached to proteins of interest in synthetic and cellular systems to ligate protein sequences together.