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Digital Droplet Infusion System for High-Precision, Low-Volume, Delivery of Drugs or Nutritional Supplements

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed the first, digital, droplet infusion system capable of high-precision delivery of very low-volume therapeutics or nutraceuticals.

Reducing Electrical Current Variations in Phase-Locked Loop Systems

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method of eliminating electrical current mismatches in the charge pumps of phase-locked loops (PLL) systems - thereby increasing their power efficiency and phase detection capabilities.

Antibiotic to Fight Gram Negative and Resistant Bacteria

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a gyramide antibiotic which is effective against Gram-negative and fluoroquinolones (FQs) resistant bacteria.

Novel CRISPR-Cas Enzyme Variants and Methods of Use

CRISPR-Cas systems include Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a guide RNA(s), which includes a segment that binds Cas proteins and a segment that binds to a target nucleic acid. For example, Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems comprise a single Cas protein bound to a guide RNA, where the Cas protein binds to and cleaves a targeted nucleic acid. The programmable nature of these systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology for use in modification of target nucleic acid.   UC Berkeley researchers have discovered novel CRISPR-Cas proteins related to other CRISPR-Cas systems that utilize a single guide RNA (sgRNA) or a combination of a tracrRNA + guide RNA to perform RNA-directed cleavage of nucleic acids that can be applicable for DNA editing and diagnostics. The enzyme can cleave the target DNA and may be used for diagnostics by utilizing its ability to cleave single-stranded DNA in trans.  

Device for Spinal Dural Repair

Dural tear is a frequent and costly complication of spinal surgery, which can cause cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, triggering additional, serious post-operative difficulties. Researchers at UC Irvine have developed a new method and device to mitigate dural tears in a rapid, safe, and water-tight manner

Anti-Human SULF2 monoclonal antibodies for research applications

Sulfatase 2 (SULF2) is an extracellular sulfatase that acts on heparan sulfate proteoglycans.  It is overexpressed and pro-oncogenic in many cancers. Its overexpression in the liver is linked to dyslipidemia and fatty liver disease. This invention describes a panel of monoclonal antibodies that are validated for immunocytochemical staining, biochemical analysis and functional studies of human SULF2.   

DNA-based, Read-Only Memory (ROM) for Data Storage Applications

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have collaborated with colleagues at the University of Washington and Emory University to develop a DNA-based, memory and data storage technology that integrates seamlessly with semiconductor-based technologies and conventional electronic devices.

Improving Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Ultra-Fast Arterial Spin Labeling

Prof. Jia Guo and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a method for improving perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) using Velocity Selective Arterial Spin Labeling (VSASL). This method uses VS labeling pulses that are capable to only label the blood that is moving within a narrow band of velocities and keep the blood moving at higher velocities unperturbed. This creates a small bolus of label that can be detected readily and quickly. This method provides MRI imaging that is far superior than conventional ASL MRI techniques with a doubled temporal resolution, improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency and quantification accuracy. Fig 1: Schematics showing how UCR’s narrow-band velocity selectivity enables ultra-fast perfusion imaging