Available Technologies

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This page allows you to search for and view non-confidential descriptions of technologies available for licensing from all ten University of California (UC) campuses.

Novel 3D Stem Cell Culture Systems

Many disorders result in tissue degeneration, including Parkinson’s disease, heart attacks, and liver failure. One promising approach to treat these disorders is cell replacement therapy, which would implant new cells or tissues to replace those damaged by disease. Cell replacement therapy relies on stem cells, which are able to differentiate into a wide number of mature cell types. However, cell replacement therapies require large numbers of cells to clinically develop and commercialize, and the current stem cell culture methods are problematic in multiple ways, including low cell yields in 2D and poorly defined culture components. By culturing stem cells three-dimensionally, instead of two-dimensionally, far larger numbers of cells can be generated. Current three-dimensional culturing systems, however, often exert harmful shear stresses and pressures on the cells, have harsh cell recovery steps, do thus not generate large cell yields.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed new materials intended for use in fully chemically defined processes for large-scale growth and differentiation of stem cells. These materials prevent harsh cell recovery steps, and can be used in a defined, highly tunable, and three-dimensional cell culture system. 

Cryogenic 3D Printing

3D printing uses additive processes, which add layers on top of each other, to generate shapes. In order to do this, the material used undergoes a phase transformation, from a malleable state to a solid state. This process incorporates the new layer onto the previous layer. Most currently used 3D printing technologies use a phase transition temperature that is higher than the room temperature, which allows printing in air at room temperature. The 3D printing device heats the material to a malleable form, then deposits a layer that cools into a solid. This method does not, however, allow sufficient structural or temporal control for printing biological materials.   UC Berkeley researchers have developed methods and devices for cryogenic 3D printing that enables printing with biological materials. Complex structures can be generated when the object is immersed in a liquid coolant, and this immersion also ensures that already printed layers remain at a constant temperature.  

CRISPR/Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Delivery In Vivo Using Gold Nanoparticles

The Cas9/Crispr gene editing technology has the potential to revolutionize biology and medicine, due to its unique ability to generate site-specific DNA recombination and gene correction. However, the delivery of Cas9 still remains a problem, and this limits the scientific and medical applications of Cas9. Current methods for delivering Cas9 are primarily based on viral gene therapy, which is problematic due to toxicity from sustained expression and random genomic integration. Non-viral gene therapy has also been investigated for delivering Cas9, guide RNA and donor DNA into cells, however this is ineffective in numerous cell types, such as ES stem cells and primary cell lines, which represent the major applications for Cas9 gene editing.   Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a novel delivery vehicle, based on gold nanoparticles, termed CRISPR-Gold, which can be used to simultaneously deliver Cas9 protein, guide RNA and donor oligonucleotides into target cells and efficiently induce site directed DNA recombination. CRISPR-Gold is composed of nanometer sized gold nanoparticles conjugated with DNA, which have Cas9 protein, guide RNA, donor oligonucleotides and endosomal disruptive polymers complexed to them. Researchers have shown that CRISPR-Gold can deliver Cas9 protein, guide RNA and donor oligonucleotides into numerous cell types, including, stem cells, iPS cells and muscle progenitor cells, and induce gene editing and gene corrections with an efficiency that is significantly better than existing delivery vehicles. Additionally researchers have shown that CRISPR-Gold can perform gene editing in vivo and correct DNA  mutations in mice via homologous recombination.  

Highly Efficient, Heterogeneous, Hybrid-Integrated Optoelectronic Device Structure with Conductive and Low Loss Interface

Researchers at the University of California Davis have developed a fabrication technique that allows conductive wafer bonding between heterogeneous semiconductor materials with low optical losses and low electrical losses (low voltage and resistance).

Passive Mechanical Exoskeleton to Reduce Hand Fatigue for Astronauts

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an apparatus that passively allows an astronaut to keep their hand closed while gripping an object, thereby reducing hand fatigue during extravehicular activities.

New Borylated Heterocycles: Indoles, Isoxazoles, Lactones, and Benzofurans, and the Methods to Make Them (related to UC Case 2013-921)

Boron building blocks play a key role in modern organic chemistry, especially in drug design and materials synthesis. Methods to generate heterocycles and borylated compounds in the same synthetic step are largely unknown; the ability to do both increases efficiency and rapidly builds molecular complexity while providing access to previously unavailable building blocks.

Bio-electrochemical Sensor for Real-time, In Vivo Clinical Tests

A minimally invasive, bio-electrochemical sensor for in vivo clinical tests that selectively measures specific target molecules in blood and tissues in real-time for many hours.

Trauma-released Proteins and Breakdown Products for Diagnosing Injury Severity, Pharmacokinetic Monitoring and Outcome Prediction in Neurotrauma Patients

UCLA researchers have identified a novel panel of neurotrauma biomarkers to diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI), spinal cord injury (SCI) and concussions.

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