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Find technologies available for licensing from UC Riverside.

Small RNAs From Fungal Pathogents Act As Effector Molecules To Suppress Host Immunity

Background: Plant-pathogen relationships have been studied meticulously for many years because fungi are notorious for causing detrimental yield losses. Many have taken a biotechnological approach to combatting fungal infections by genetically engineering fungal-resistant genes into plants.  Brief Description: UCR Researchers have discovered the underlying mechanism of action of Botrytis cinerea, a fungal pathogen that causes grey mold disease in various plants and crops. They’ve identified novel non-protein effectors, small RNAs, that silence specific genes in the host. These fungal sRNAs are transferred into the host cells to suppress its immunity and achieve full infection. With this insight, we can genetically engineer plants to successfully combat harmful pathogenic attacks by eliciting an immune response.

Environmentally Friendly Navigation Techniques

Background: Current navigation systems offer “shortest-distance” or “shortest-time” functions to help avoid traffic congestion but neither of them determine the most fuel efficient route. With rising gas prices and vehicle emissions, a more advanced navigation system with additional functions, such as an environmentally-friendly feature, is needed. This accomplishment can make a huge improvement on increasing fuel costs and air pollution. The in-vehicle navigation system is also expected to competitively penetrate the US market in the next couple years with annual sales quadrupling to $13M.  Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed an innovative vehicle navigation system (VNS) that will allow users to choose a route that is the most gas efficient and emanates less emissions. The energy- and emissions-minimization function is incorporated on top of distance- and time-minimizing functions that currently exists in the traditional VNS. This new intelligent transportation system utilizes a state-of-the-art modal emissions model (CMEM) that encompasses real-world vehicle activity patterns, and can calculate the fuel consumption and emission values of each vehicle trajectory.

A Transposon Vector From Aedes Aegypti For Use In Vertebrate And Invertebrate Gene Transfer

Background: Therapeutic delivery of genes is a rapidly evolving technique used to treat or prevent a disease at the root of the problem. Another widely used variation of this technique is to insert a transgene into animals and crops for production of desirable proteins. The global transgenic market is currently $24B with annual growth projections of 10%.  Brief Description: UCR Researchers have identified a novel transposon from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. This mobile DNA sequence can insert itself into various functional genes to either cause or reverse mutations. They have successfully developed a transposon vector system that can be used in both unicellular & multicellular organisms, which can offer notable insight to enhance current transgenic technologies as well as methods of gene therapy.

MicroRNA Fractionation

Background: The market landscape of the US global market for microRNA research tool, services, diagnostics and drug discovery is estimated to grow 13% annually and reach $1 billion in the next 4 years. The market continues to grow with many pharmaceutical and biotech companies becoming more and more involved in microRNA research to discover specific microRNA biomarkers for diagnostics and therapeutics. Current techniques are unable to identify which microRNA carriers are the most appropriate for disease diagnosis. In this regard, there are relationships between microRNA dysregulation and human disease in approximately 168 diseases, including cancers, heart disease, diabetes, alcoholism, and obesity.  Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed methods for rapid separation of different microRNA carriers in serum, using asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation or specially designed microchips. They have successfully identified microRNAs carriers as sensitive biomarkers, which will aid in the discovery of more effective therapeutic approaches. 

Drug-Like Compounds That Enhance Plant Immunity And Growth

Background: Due to the rapidly increasing demand of food production, agricultural biotechnology companies are aiming to improve crop productivity. Biotechnology tools that develop novel plant traits are projected to have a $1.3B global market with annual growth of 49.9% by 2019.  Brief Description: UCR Researchers have developed a drug-like compound, HTC, that is structurally distinct from other agrochemicals and will rapidly induce an immune response in plants to ward off pathogens. Only a small dose of this novel compound is needed for optimal protection as well as growth enhancement. By genetically engineering the plant to have a stronger inherent immune system, toxic chemicals like pesticides are no longer needed to protect the plant. Its implementation can render decreased usage of agrochemicals that are harmful to humans and the environment.

Development Of Biodegradable Bait Station For Liquid Ant Bait

Background: Current bait station designs and other pest control tools are not very ideal nor advanced – they leak, become excessively hydrated or dehydrated, and need frequent maintenance. The global pest control services market is expected to grow annually at 5.3% and the industry is always looking for unique ways to conquer them.  Brief Description: UCR Researchers have developed a novel, protected bait station that has controlled liquid bait release. The compact design contains a sugary, insecticide liquid bait that diffuses through an absorbent polymer or gel matrix. Only ants have access to the station and once an ant consumes the bait, the station biodegrades thus eliminating bait station cleanup.

Development Of Pheromone Assisted Techniques To Improve Efficacy Of Insecticide Sprays Targeting Urban Pest Ant Species

Background: Pheromones are chemical secretions that dictate behavior in many social insects such as ants, bees and termites. They use them for various pivotal roles in foraging, nest relocation, defense and reproduction. Implementation of pheromone trails that lead urban pests to their imminent doom is a very notable, strategic approach. Current pest management programs are in need of better synthetic pheromone formulations for a more effective and species-specific utilization.   Brief Description: UCR Researchers have developed a novel synthetic pheromone compound and management system that lures targeted ant species to an insecticide-treated area. This pheromone-assisted technique will maximize the efficacy of insecticide sprays by reducing insecticide contact in the environment while increasing exposure of ants for eradication.  

University of California, Riverside
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Riverside,CA 92521