Available Technologies

No technologies match these criteria.
Schedule UC TechAlerts to receive an email when technologies are published that match this search. Click on the Save Search link above

Find technologies available for licensing from UC Riverside.

Heterogeneous Ruthenium Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis

Professor Matthew Conley from the University of California, Riverside has developed heterogeneous ruthenium catalysts for olefin metathesis. These catalysts are also more active than state-of-the-art homogeneous catalysts in metathesis of terminal olefins.  They are combined with state-of-the-art anion capped materials that anchor positively charged Grubbs catalyst to the surface to form active heterogeneous olefin metathesis catalyst. This technology has the potential to produce heterogeneous catalysts that are less expensive, more efficient, and faster than the available homogenous ruthenium catalysts for olefin metathesis. Fig 1: Chemical structure of UCR’s heterogneous Grubb’s catalyst supported on functionalized silica for olefin metathesis.  

Highly Selective MMP-12 Antibodies

Researchers from the University of California, Riverside have developed potent monoclonal antibody inhibitors with high MMP-12 selectivity.  These antibodies have applications in pharmaceuticals and biomedical sciences. Specifically, these antibodies may be developed as  therapies for inflammatory and neurological diseases. Fig 1: Inhibitory function of the MMP-12 antibodies LG4, LH6, and LH11 towards cdMMP-12. 

New Device to Test for Pulmonary Function for 21st Century Care

Prof. Mona Eskandari, whose research is known for seminal strides in experimental characterization and computational modeling of lung structural mechanics using novel techniques developed in her lab, has discovered a new method for measuring pulmonary function. It works by analyzing the change in temporal pressure while a patient is holding their breath. The measurement device is simple, comfortable and error-free for the patient to self-administer. Algorithms are used to transform the detailed lung data collection into actionable metrics for early detection capabilities for medical intervention and prevention. The discovery could provide more accessible, detailed, timely, and actionable data on lung function compared to conventional and currently used methods. Fig 1: The medical device prototype being tested in the laboratory  Fig 2: Preliminary data exhibiting detectable differences between several healthy and diseased mice lungs when utilizing the proposed new pulmonary function method

Functionalized Sila-Adamantane

Brief description not available

Catalysts For Direct Conversion Of Ethylene To Propylene

Profs. Matthew P. Conley and Richard R. Schrock from the University of California, Riverside have developed a new catalyst that may be used to synthesize propylene from ethylene under mild conditions. The key steps involved in the direct conversion of ethylene to propylene are ring-contraction of a metallacyclopentane complex to a metallacyclobutane complex followed by rearrangement of the metallacyclobutane complex to propylene. This technology is advantageous because it consists of a single reaction overall that operates at mild temperatures, because the catalyst efficiency can be engineered to optimize turnover frequency and yield, and because propylene is the only product of the reaction.   Fig 1: The UCR catalytic cycle for ethylene to propylene  

High Yield Co-Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Intermediates to Methylated Furans

Prof. Charles Cai and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a method for high yield co-conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to produce high octane fuel additives dimethyl furan (DMF) and methyl furans (MF). This technology works by using Cu-Ni/TiO2, a unique catalytic material that enables high yield (~90%) conversion of 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) and furfural (FF) sourced from lignocellulosic biomass into methylated furans (MF) in either single or co-processing schemes. This invention is advantageous compared to existing technologies due to its high yield and efficiency, low cost, and stable conversion process.   Fig 1: UCR’s furfural conversion and product yields as function of reaction time over Cu-Ni/TiO2.  

Low-Cost Synthesis of High Performance Polyurethanes

Professor Charles Cai from the University of California, Riverside has developed a method to produce a high-performance, renewable polyurethane material made from biomass lignin for use as an adhesive, resin, coating, or plastic. In this method, diols were introduced to realize faster and complete dissolution of technical lignins in volatile organic solvents, which improve lignin miscibility with other components and its dispersion in the PU materials. This technology is advantageous because it improves the economic viability of lignocellulosic biorefinery, can replace petroleum-based polyols in commercial polyurethanes products to reduce carbon footprint, and, as a natural UV-block, lignin reduces the UV aging of PU materials.   Fig 1: The UCR method to produce polyurethane material from biomass lignin.