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Find technologies available for licensing from UC Riverside.

Hydrogel for Improved Burn Wound Healing

Background: The US spends $25B alone on wound treatment of burns. The wound treatment market is projected to grow to $18.3B in just 4 years. Current treatments have been unsuccessful in fostering proper wound healing safe from infections. Not only do they have low efficacy, but they are very expensive to produce. The most commonly used wound dressing is a hydrogel. Hydrogels reduce pain and healing time, promotes cell proliferation and collagen deposition, and is the most appropriate for burn wounds.  Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed a novel formulation that can be embedded into a hydrogel to significantly improve wound healing. Through successful conjugation of a peptide and polymer, stability and longevity have been enhanced. Their formulation induced a 3-fold increase in density of newly formed microvessels, greatly improving tissue quality.

3D Printer Toxicity Treatment

Background: The 3-D printer industry is projected to grow to $16.2B by 2018. These instruments can be used as manufacturing tools, anywhere from printing consumer products, e.g. toys, to medical tools, e.g. implants, prosthetics, surgical tools. As 3-D printers are becoming more readily available to the average consumers, finding techniques to ensure safety is of vital importance.  Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed a method of treating 3D printed objects with ultraviolet light to reduce their toxicity. They used zebrafish to assess bioaccumulation of toxic chemicals. By UV curing STL- and FDM-printed parts, they were also able to improve chemical and biological compatibility, shown by increased survival rates of zebrafish. This method is more effective than existing techniques of treating parts with supercritical carbon dioxide which requires a specialized, expensive instrument. Although the materials used are known to be toxic per stated on material safety data sheets, techniques such as this could limit the toxicity and open up more application areas for these materials and 3D printed parts. 

Tango Mandarin

Background: California is one of the largest citrus producers in the world, and the demand for fresh citrus fruit that is seedless or low-seeded is on the rise. W. Murcott mandarin is the currently popular mandarin cultivar that has been known worldwide for its high quality and about 2-3 million trees have been widely planted throughout California over the past decade. Unfortunately, isolation of citrus orchards have been difficult and consequently, W. murcott mandarins have become very seedy due to cross pollination by other citrus varieties. Therefore, consumer demands for mandarins that can maintain a low seed count and high-quality is increasing.  Brief Description: ‘Tango’ is a mandarin selection developed by mutation breeding and is seedless or low-seeded in all situations of cross-pollination. It is a mid- to late-season irradiated selection of W. Murcott mandarin that has a rich, sweet and juicy flavor. With a deep orange color and easy-to-peel rind, ‘Tango’ is n attractive citrus that is popular and sought-out by the citrus industry. ‘Tango’ also exhibits excellent vertical tree growth habits, which allows it to produce a large and dense crown. For multiple generations, this mandarin selection has remained true-to-type for low seed content and its other traits.

Shasta, Tahoe, Yosemite Mandarins: TDE Hybrids

Background: California is one of the largest citrus producers in the world, and the demand for fresh citrus fruit that is seedless or low-seeded is on the rise. W. Murcott mandarin is the currently popular mandarin cultivar that has been known worldwide for its high quality and about 2-3 million trees have been widely planted throughout California over the past decade. Unfortunately, isolation of citrus orchards have been difficult and consequently, W. murcott mandarins have become very seedy due to cross pollination by other citrus varieties. Therefore, consumer demands for mandarins that can maintain a low seed count and high-quality is increasing.  Brief Description: UCR Researchers developed Shasta Gold (TDE2), Tahoe Gold (TDE3) and Yosemite Gold (TDE4) mandarin hybrids. All three produce low-seeded or seedless fruit with deep orange, easy to peel rinds, and rich sweet flavor. They exhibit excellent vertical tree growth habits, which allows it to produce a large and dense crown. Tahoe matures the earliest between November - January, while Shasta and Yosemite mature later between December - March and December - January, respectively.

Combined Optical Micromanipulation & Interferometric Topography

Background: Optical tweezers (OTs) is a commonly used light-based technology with a broad range of applications in studying mechanobiology. While OTs are capable of making force measurements at the pico-Newton level, they cannot be used to provide size and structural information on the object being investigated. The platform technology developed at UCR provides simultaneous measurements of force and physical dimensions. Currently, many leading manufacturers for nanoanalytic instruments are expanding their operations in North America and Asia to support the growth of its application in the scientific community.   Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed COMMIT, an all-optical platform, by combining optical tweezers and a novel microscopy method. COMMIT allows for simultaneous measurement of nano-sized objects and pN forces. Existing methods call for fluorescent labels and lack high resolution in imaging. This platform facilitates dynamic measurement of transient nanomechanical properties of cells in real-time.

Innovative Sensors for Detection of Counterfeited ICs

Background: In 2013, the US economy incurred $215B in damages from counterfeiting and piracy. Since then, it has been growing relentlessly, stifling innovation and revenues. A wide-range of counterfeited integrated circuits (ICs) exist but current detection systems can only distinguish one type. Therefore, an all-inclusive, yet cost-efficient, detection solution is needed to lower the detrimental impacts of counterfeiting and piracy.   Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed an innovative multifunctional on-chip sensor for comprehensive detection of counterfeited ICs. Their original on-chip invention could measure usage age via electromigration, but they have improved upon the accuracy of this readout by implementing antifuse memory block and combining two aging sensors: RO-based and EM-based. To enhance security even further, they applied corresponding post-fabrication methods of registering ICs with unique IDs so that activation can only occur once matched up to the ID embedded in the antifuse memory component.

Novel Mollusk-killing Biopesticide

Background: Slugs and snails are among the most important invasive agricultural and horticultural pests. They cause crop and yield loss, reduce crop quality, cause product shipment rejection, transmit plant and human pathogens, and increase management costs as new introductions become widespread and established. The most commonly used management options can be toxic to pets and other non target organisms, harmful to the environment; non-cost effective, and their effficacy is variable and influenced by environmental conditions such as moisture.   Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed a novel potential biopesticide that targets slugs and snails using the recently discovered, US strain of the nematode species Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita and two other species. The European strain of this nematode (Nemaslug ®) is being used to successfully manage slugs and snails in Europe. Recent surveys show that consumers in the US demand a more effective and safe pest management program for these invasive gastropods, even if it was more costly than existing options.

Functionally Selective Ligands for Study and Inhibition of Inflammation

Background: Due to the complexity of the complement system cascade, biological roles of many signaling receptors are unknown. Additionally, biased ligand binding to cell-bound receptors may lead to selective intracellular effector binding and ligand-specific pathway activation and function. Mechanistic knowledge forms the basis for assay development to explore pharmacology against complement-mediated inflammatory diseases.   Brief Description: A multidisciplinary team of researchers from UCR, Texas A&M, Sheffield, and Queensland have discovered the first functionally selective peptide ligands for a complement system receptor that is involved in inflammation. The peptides are functionally selective ligands of C5aR2 but not C5aR1 or C3aR, and they have been characterized in vitro and in vivo. These peptides are novel tools that can modulate the activity of the receptor in vitro and in vivo, and interrogate the function of the receptor and its implication in inflammatory diseases.

University of California, Riverside
Office of Technology Commercialization

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Riverside,CA 92521

otc@ucr.edu

http://research.ucr.edu/