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Transformable Smart Peptides as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed smart, supramolecular, materials that can assemble into nanoparticles. These particles can then be used to target tumor cells.

Vascular Anastomosis Device

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a surgical device to facilitate vascular anastomosis procedures with enhanced ease and speed.

Integrin Binding to P-Selectin as a Treatment for Cancer and Inflammation

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a potential drug target for cancer and inflammation by studying the binding of integrins to P-selectin.

Modulating MD-2-Integrin Interaction for Sepsis Treatment

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a potential therapeutic treatment for sepsis by modulating the interaction between integrins and Myeloid Differentiation factor 2 (MD-2).

Tumor-Suppressing Growth Factor Decoy

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed dominant-negative FGF2 antagonists that suppress angiogenesis and tumor growth.

Modular Piezoelectric Sensor Array with Beamforming Channels for Ultrasound Imaging

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a large area sensor array for ultrasound imaging systems that utilizes high-bandwidth piezoelectric sensors and modular design elements.

Devices and Methods for Monitoring Respiration of a Tracheostomy Patient

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a small device that attaches directly to the hub of a tracheostomy tube and enables the monitoring of respiratory function in tracheostomy patients during sleep studies.

Biosensor - Comprised of “Turn-on” Probes - with the Ability to Detect DNA Sequences in Living Cells

Researchers have developed a split-enzyme system that can detect genetic information in living cells by using luciferase linked to programmable DNA-binding domains.