Available Technologies

No technologies match these criteria.
Schedule UC TechAlerts to receive an email when technologies are published that match this search. Click on the Save Search link above

Find technologies available for licensing from UC Davis.

Haploid-Induction in CRISPR Susceptible Plants

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method to produce haploid progeny plants from transgenic and wild-type plants that only carry chromosomes from the wild-type gamete.

Flavonol Profile as a Sun Exposure Assessor for Grapes

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a solar radiation assessment method for grapes that uses a flavonol profile. This method can be done using either HPLC or through the computer processing of the absorption spectra of a purified flavonol extract via a purification kit.

Non-Living Edible Surrogates For Process Validation Food Processing Plants

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a surface sanitation validation system that utilizes a non-living edible surrogate to potentially help determine food processing efficacy.

Livestock Triggered Mechanical Valve

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a novel mechanical valve to disperse water for the purposes of cooling livestock. This simple and easy to fabricate valve is actuated by the animal, thus saving water.

Generic Method for Controlled Assembly of Molecules

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, in collaboration with researchers at IBM, have developed a widely applicable method to assemble molecules regardless of their intrinsic self-assembly properties.

Antibacterial Polypeptide with Broad-Spectrum Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Activity

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a polypeptide that kills pathogenic bacteria.

Generation of Non-Transgenic, Heritably Gene-Edited Plants

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a guided nuclease based expression system to introduce genetic modifications into plants without the need for tissue culture.

One Step Process of Forming Complex Coacervation During Spray Drying

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a formation of complex coacervate microparticles by spray drying.