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High Pressure Heat Exchanger Produced by Additive Manufacturing

Researchers at the University of California, Davis and Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new design and fabrication method for high pressure heat exchangers (HX) using additive manufacturing (AM). This method would allow for the creation of primary heat exchanger (PHX) systems with minimal energy loss.

Design for Viable Integrated Wind Turbines

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering have demonstrated improved aerodynamic and mechanical performance of wind turbines with a parafoil design that reduces wind turbine rotor weight along with a “drag start” method for rotation of lift-driven wind turbines.

Synthesis Technique to Achieve High-Anisotropy FeNi

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an innovative synthesis approach to achieve high anisotropy L1 FeNi by combining physical vapor deposition and a high speed rapid thermal annealing (RTA).

A Low-Profile Flow Shear Sensing Unit

UCLA researchers have developed an accurate low-profile shear sensing unit that is viable for both gas and liquid flows.

Processing Spinel-Less Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

This invention, intended for use in the processing of turbine engine blades’ thermal barrier coatings, is a two-step procedure used to produce a thermally grown oxide that is completely devoid of lifetime-limiting spinel oxides. Both steps take place at the same temperature used in present day bond coat pre-oxidation, utilize everyday gases, and can be performed serially in the same furnace, in a matter of hours. In step one, pre-oxidation of a bond-coated blade yields a thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that contains a limited amount of spinel. In step two, all spinel is removed in situ. In an industrial-scale setup, the entire process would take place in less than 24 hours, including ramp times to and from the exposure temperature. Once blade specimens are cooled and removed from the furnace, they are then ready to be coated with the thermally protective yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer, using industry-standard techniques. Due to the nature of the process, no new spinel is expected to grow at the critical TGO–YSZ interface for as long as the part operates in service, which means that the blade will be completely spinel-less for its entire usable lifetime. By eliminating all spinel-related failure mechanisms, this may result in longer blade lifetimes and therefore significant cost reduction.

High-Strength Wind Turbine Blades and Wings

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a novel biplane blade configuration that optimizes aero-structural performance for wind turbine blades and other airfoil applications.

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