Proteomic Chip for determining immune status and prognosis of HIV patients

Tech ID: 27266 / UC Case 2012-662-0

Brief Description

Researchers at UCI have developed a multi-clade HIV-1 proteomic chip that helps with diagnosis of clade specific infection of HIV-1. Proteomic chip can determine the immune status and prognosis of HIV infected individuals.

Full Description

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that attacks the immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). According to World Health Organization (WHO), more than 70 million people are infected with HIV and about 35 million have died due to HIV globally. Although there is currently no cure for AIDS, with early detection and the correct treatment, people can live normal and healthy lives with HIV. Testing for HIV has become the critical component of HIV/AIDS prevention strategies as an alarming number of people infected with HIV remain unaware of their condition.

The commonly used HIV tests to detect the infection include ELISA and Immunoblot techniques. Infected people produce certain HIV antibodies that are specific for the clade of HIV with which they are infected and such antibodies can be detected using these tests. However, antibodies produced against one clade of HIV will not detect the other clades of HIV thereby increasing the risk of false negative results. Also, the sensitivity and high rate of false positive results have been other concerns of these tests.

To overcome these problems, researchers at UCI have developed a proteomic chip with an array of HIV-1 proteins derived from 5 major clades (A1, A2, B,C and D) embedded on a glass slide. The multi-clade HIV-1 chip allows screening of patient blood samples simultaneously on over 130 proteins from multiple clades of HIV-1. Due to the diversity of antibody response, the multi-clade HIV-1 chip is an extremely important invention for screening and monitoring prognosis of the disease in infected patients.

Advantages

The chip allows simultaneous screening on many HIV proteins and protein fragments from multiple clades of H1V-l. Furthermore, this chip may be used to determine a patient’s immune status or prognosis based on their anti-HIV antibody production.

State Of Development

The chip allows simultaneous screening on many HIV proteins and protein fragments from multiple clades of H1V-l. Furthermore, this chip may be used to determine a patient’s immune status or prognosis based on their anti-HIV antibody production.

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