Available Technologies

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Find technologies available for licensing from UC Santa Barbara.

Bio-electrochemical Sensor for Real-time, In Vivo Clinical Tests

A minimally invasive, bio-electrochemical sensor for in vivo clinical tests that selectively measures specific target molecules in blood and tissues in real-time for many hours.

Tunable White Light Based on Polarization-Sensitive LEDs

White LEDs that can change their color-rendering properties through use of a polarizing element.

High Light Extraction Efficiency III-Nitride LED

A III-nitride light emitting diode (LED) with increased light extraction from having at least one textured surface of a semipolar or nonpolar plane of a III-nitride layer of the LED.

High-Efficiency, Mirrorless Non-Polar and Semi-Polar Light Emitting Devices

An (Al, Ga, In)N light emitting device in which high light generation efficiency occurs by fabricating the device using non-polar or semi-polar GaN crystals.

Electrochemical Technique for Accelerated Nitride Crystal Growth

A novel technique for increasing the nitrogen flux during nitride crystal growth in either bulk or thin-film form.

Reactor with Carbon Fiber Materials for Improved III-Nitride Growth

A reactor for growing high-quality group III-nitride crystals using carbon-carbon fiber composites in low oxygen ambient environments.

Versatile, Modular and Affordable Microwave and Radiofrequency Magnetic Resonance Setup for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

A DNP setup operating at a magnetic field at or above 5 Tesla, powered by a solid state microwave source, transmitted using low loss quasi optics and utilizes an externally tunable, inductively coupled radio frequency probe integrated into part of the waveguide to provide efficient microwave transmission to the sample while maintaining good NMR performance and complete hardware modularity.

Engineering Human Proteases for Therapeutic Use

A methodology termed “protease evolution via cleavage of an intracellular substrate” (PrECISE) to enable engineering of human protease activity and specificity toward an arbitrary peptide target. 

University of California, Santa Barbara
Office of Technology & Industry Alliances

342 Lagoon Road,Santa Barbara,CA 93106-2055 |
Tel: 805-893-2073 | Fax: 805.893.5236 | shaw@tia.ucsb.edu