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Drift-Free and Calibration-Free Measurement of Analytes

A method of achieving the calibration- and drift-free operation of voltammetric electrochemical biosensors.

Circulatory Cells as Carriers for Photo-Activated Bioregulators

Circulatory cells as carriers for photo-activated small molecule bioregulator releasing compounds and systems.

A Process for Rapid, Continuous 3D Printing

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed a new method of continuous 3D printing that now allows complex, multiphase structures to be printed in a single process.

Processing In Non-Volatile Memory Architecture for Bulk Bitwise Operations

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed a processing In non-volatile memory architecture for bulk bitwise operations (referred to as Pinatubo).

Frequency-Based Filtering of Mechanical Actuation

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have created a device that delivers pressure or displacement to specific locations based on the frequency of the actuator used as input.

Simple Method For Dc Capillary Electrophoresis

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have developed a microchannel geometry that observes and measures the motion of charged particles that enable one to perform simple DC electrophoresis to measure the electrophoretic mobility of analytes and particles.

A Hybrid Silicon Laser-Quantum Well Intermixing Wafer Bonded Integration Platform

An approach for integrating InP-based photonic devices together with low loss silicon photonics and complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics.

Drift-Free, Self-Calibrated Interrogation Method For Electrochemical Sensors Based On Electron Transfer Kinetics

A new method using chronoamperometry in place of voltammetry to obtain data from electrochemical sensors, including electrochemical biosensors.