Available Technologies

No technologies match these criteria.
Schedule UC TechAlerts to receive an email when technologies are published that match this search. Click on the Save Search link above

Find technologies available for licensing from all ten University of California (UC) campuses.

Magneto-Optic Nanocrystalline Oxides Fabrication

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside developed a fabrication technique that is capable of manufacturing highly transparent Magneto-optic oxides with reduced processing times. Their technique employs CAPAD (current activated, pressure assisted densification). Briefly, rare earth material in powder form is exposed to a specific current, which heats the sample (below melting temp). Pressure is then applied to the powder, compressing it into the desired shape. The processing temperature is optimized in order to achieve sufficient density without causing excessive phase changes that would destroy light transparency. This process produces materials quickly (<20 min), which, combined with high magneto-optical properties, promises less expensive, smaller, more portable magneto-optical devices. Fig. 1 Top image is a schematic cross-section of the CAPAD apparatus. The bottom image displays a Dy2O3 (dysprosium oxide) sample processed using this method. The sample is suspended from a magnet. Lasers of various wavelengths still transmit through the sample This indicates that the desired magnetic/optical properties of the material have been preserved. Fig. 2 Graph of measured average grain size and density of Dy2O3 samples versus processing temperature. The graph shows that an ideal processing temperature is 1100˚C, providing the highest packing density and smallest grain sizes.    

Human Resistin for the Treatment of Sepsis

Prof. Meera Nair and her colleagues at UCR have discovered that human resistin may be used as a therapy to treat sepsis.  Using a transgenic mouse model expressing human resistin, researchers showed that  mice expressing resistin had a 80-100% rate of survival from a sepsis-like infection when compared to wildtype mice with the same infection. The researchers also found that human resistin decreased the number of pro-inflammatory and Th1 cytokines.  Through immunoprecipitation assays, human resistin was found to bind to TLR-4 thus blocking the TLR-4 signaling in immune and inflammatory cells. Fig. 1 shows the survival curves for four different mouse models exposed to a sepsis like infection. The red line represents wild type C57BL/6 mice and none of these mice survived the infection. The black line is the background mouse model without the transgene incorporated into its genome. The Tg+ and Tg2+ are two different transgenic mouse models expressing human resistin. Fig. 2 shows that structural modeling predicts that resistin (green/blue) binds TLR4 (red) and blocks binding LPS co-receptor MD2 (grey)

On-Chip Calibration And Control Of Optical Phased Arrays

Optimized on-chip control architecture and optimized phase shifter tuning strategy that scales to extremely large channel counts with significantly reduced on-chip footprint.

Utilization Of Recombinant Glucosyltransferases For Value-Added Chemicals

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Glycoyltransferases are a large class of enzymes that act to catalyze the ligation of sugar onto an acceptor molecule – a process termed glycosylation. Within plants, a majority of these enzymes are involved in adding sugar groups to small molecules, forming “glycosides”. Such a modification can heavily impact the bioactivity, solubility, and physical properties of a molecule. Previous researchers have shown direct microbial bioconversion of aromatic/aliphatic flavor and fragrant molecules into their glucosides via glycosyltransferase activity via either feeding/bioconversion or direct production from glucose. However, very little emphasis has been placed on industrial yeast-­based production of specialist fragrances/flavorings or medicinal drugs.   Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a novel technology for producing plant pigment glucosides (such as highly decorated anthocyanins, coumarin glucosides, or betanins) in S. cerevisiae for industrial fermentation. Production of such colorimetric glycoside agents has value for various industries including solar-­cell, diagnostic reagent, and food-­dye manufacturers.  The technology can be used to improve the titers of commodity chemicals or the properties of various specialty or medicinal compounds. The technology also addresses one possible solution to combating the contamination of industrial fermenters through providing a method of enabling the utilization of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents without harming the production host and as one facet of improving microbial tolerance to lignocellulose hydrolysate phenolics.  

Modulation Of Lymphatic Valve And Vessel Formation To Treat Diseases, Such As Trasplant Rejection

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Lymphatic Valve formation is associated with lymphangiogenesis, a pathological event that occurs in many diseases after inflammatory, infections, immunogenic or traumatic insults. These valves play critical roles in directing lymph flow inside the lymphatic vessels. The Lymphatic pathway is a primary mediator of immune responses, including transplant rejection. The current regimen of pharmacotherapy with corticosteroids is of limited efficacy and is fraught with serious side effects.   Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have identified Itga-9 is critically involved in lymphatic valve formation after pathological insults, and itga-9 blockade can reduce the number of lymphatic valves formed inside the pathological lymphatic vessels. Moreover, Itga-9 interference can be used to modulate immune responses and transplant rejection. Additionally, ITga-9 can be used to improve the therapeutic effects of other anti-lymphangiogenic molecules, such as VEGFR-3. When used in combination, the formulation of both valves and lymphatic vessels are greatly suppressed and better therapeutic outcomes can be achieved for severe diseases, such as high-risk transplant rejection.  

Half-Virtual-Half-Physical Microactuator

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a half-virtual-half-physical microactuator that utilizes a combination of computational models and microelectromechanical systems for use in medical devices and mechanical systems.

Use of Augmented Reality for Enhanced & Efficient Communication Technologies

A communication interaction paradigm based on augmented reality that enables a remote collaborator to control his/her viewpoint onto a remote scene and communication information with visual references such as identifying objects, locations, directions, spatial instructions, etc.