CMV Vectors with an Inactivated Viral IL-10 Gene and Coding for a Foreign Antigen

Tech ID: 29731 / UC Case 2017-747-0

Abstract

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have developed CMV vectors with an inactivated viral IL-10 gene and additionally code for a foreign protein.

Full Description

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus that can infect almost anyone. In the United States, nearly one in three children are already infected with CMV by age five, and over half of adults have been infected with CMV by age 40. Once a person has contracted CMV, they will carry it indefinitely, meaning it can reactivate later on in life. In healthy people, the infection causes a mild flu-like illness that lasts a few days or weeks. In susceptible people, however, such as those with suppressed immunity or unborn babies, CMV can be a dangerous infection. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent CMV or its reactivation.

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have developed CMV vectors with an inactivated viral IL-10 gene and additionally code for a foreign (non-CMV) protein. Many forms of CMV encode a viral form of IL-10 protein, which is generally thought to be immunosuppressive and contribute to viral persistence. By inactivating IL-10, an immune response of greater intensity is produced. In the absence of viral Il-10, the foreign protein may stimulate immune responses of superior quality or magnitude, which are more suitable for controlling disease pathogenesis.

Applications

  • Prevents contraction of viral CMV

Features/Benefits

  • Provokes a strong immune response
  • Can be varied to correspond to CMV of various species

Patent Status

Patent Pending

Contact

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Inventors

  • Barry, Peter A.
  • Chang, Wen-Lan
  • Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis
  • Miller, Corey
  • Sparger, Ellen E.

Other Information

Keywords

CMV Vector, IL-10 Inactivation, Coding for Foreign Protein, Prevented Pathogenesis

Categorized As