Endoscopic, Laparoscopic, Robotic And Minimally Invasive Force Sensor And Monitoring System

Tech ID: 28708 / UC Case 2017-587-0

Brief Description

Minimally invasive ureteroscopy is a common procedure in adults, with over 10,000 procedures conducted annually in California alone. The ureteral access sheath (“UAS”), a highly effective device used to facilitate minimally invasive ureteroscopy, can injure the patient when excessive force is used during its placement. Inventors at UCI have developed a minimally invasive force sensor and monitoring system that measures force during UAS placement and can preclude injury by alerting the physician when the threshold for injury is being approached. It thus can be used for medical personnel safety training, quality control and standardization of minimally invasive ureteroscopy, as well as being applied to the passage of other catheters into natural orifices or channels./

Full Description

Urinary stone disease carries a lifetime risk of 12% in males and 6% in females, with a recurrence rate of 50% within 10 years. Evidence suggests that the global prevalence of urinary stone disease is increasing. Moreover, a recent estimate shows that the annual cost burden of urinary stone disease in the United States, alone, exceeds $5 billion dollars. Thus, there is an urgent need to reduce the clinical and economic burden of urinary stone disease.

Minimally invasive surgery, in particular ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy, has become the gold standard for treating urinary stone disease globally. One of the most effective devices for facilitating minimally invasive ureteroscopy is the ureteral access sheath. Yet, physician fear of injury due to excessive force during ureteral access sheath deployment prevents its ubiquitous adoption in the healthcare industry. Currently, there is no way to measure the force being applied to the ureteral access sheath during deployment. As a result, significant ureteral injuries have occurred necessitating long-term indwelling ureteral stent placement or, on rare occasion, corrective surgery.

Inventors at UCI have developed a minimally invasive force sensor and monitoring system that continuously measures force during deployment of the ureteral access sheath to aid in increasing the safety and effectiveness of ureteroscopy procedures. The device has an ergonomic hand-held component containing the force sensor that physically couples to the ureteral access sheath as it is being deployed. The hand-held component transmits continuous force measurements wirelessly to an Android based tablet that displays the force measurements in real time using both visual and audio indicators to alert the physician when threshold injury levels of force are being reached. The force sensor and monitoring system also comprises a proprietary software and embedded firmware. In addition to making ureteral access sheath deployment procedures safer for patients, the force sensor and monitoring system can be used during the deployment of virtually any minimally invasive surgical device, including an ureteral access sheath, catheter, guidewire, or trocar. The force sensor and monitoring system can also be used for safety training of medical personnel, quality control and standardization of minimally invasive surgical procedures.

Suggested uses

-Assists with minimally invasive ureteroscopy, or any similar procedure using devices such as a ureteral access sheath, catheter, guidewire, or trocar.

-Medical personnel safety training, quality control and standardization of minimally invasive ureteroscopy or any like procedure.

Advantages

Assists in making ureteral access sheath deployment procedures safer

Hand held component of the device is specially designed to facilitate use in an operating room for convenience and ease of use

First of its kind to measure force and provide continuous measurements during deployment of any manual catheter or sheath

The Android based tablet component displays force measurements to the physician continuously in real time

Patent Status

Country Type Number Dated Case
United States Of America Published Application 2018-031146 11/01/2018 2017-587
 

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