Available Technologies

No technologies match these criteria.
Schedule UC TechAlerts to receive an email when technologies are published that match this search. Click on the Save Search link above

Find technologies available for licensing from UC Riverside.

Learn more about UC TechAlerts - Save your searches and get notified of new UC technologies

Novel Genetic Switch for Inducing Gene Expression

Prof. Sean Cutler and colleagues at the University of California, Riverside have engineered a system and methods to induce gene expression in plants and organisms, including mammals, using the chemical compound mandipropamid. Using the PYR/PYL/HAB1 promoter system, the PYR1/HAB1 system is reprogrammed to be activiated with mandipropamid.  When the PYR1/HAB1 system dimerizes through chemical induced dimerization (CID) with mandipropamid, the system functions as a control switch for gene expression. This technology has been demonstrated to advantageously accelerate citrus breeding.  It may be applied to improve CAR T-cell therapy and agricultural crops. Fig 1: UCR’s PYR1/HAB1 system is programmed through chemical induced dimerization (CID) initiated by mandipropamid to function as a switch for agrochemical control of gene expression.  

Methods to Prevent and Treat Diffuse Large and Other B Cell Lymphomas

Professor Ameae Walker from the University of California, Riverside, Professor Srividya Swaminathan from the City of Hope Beckman Research Institute and their colleagues have developed a method for the prevention and treatment of B cell lymphomas. This technology works by systemically inhibiting expression of one form of the set of cell surface molecules that allow cells to respond to prolactin. This highly specific technology suppresses the deleterious downstream effects of prolactin that promote and sustain abnormal B cells. This invention is advantageous compared to existing technologies: all measures in mouse models and analysis of human cells suggest it is nontoxic and therefore will have significantly fewer, if any, side effects. It may also be used together with anti-psychotics that elevate prolactin. Finally, the technology includes a method for screening populations susceptible to development of DLBCL and other B lymphomas for early signs of disease. Antimaia Acts at Three Stages of B Lymphoma Development: 1) Antimaia, a splice modulating oligonucleotide (SMO) that decreases expression of the long form of the prolactin receptor, reduces the number of premalignant cells and the formation of abnormal antibody-producing cells. This also improves the symptomatology of autoimmune disease. 2) Antimaia prevents the conversion of premalignant to overt malignant B cells. 3) Antimaia kills B lymphoma cells. Antimaia works by reducing the number of long and intermediate form prolactin receptors (LF/IF PRLR) without effect on short receptors (SFPRLR). PRL, prolactin; Bcl2, B cell lymphoma 2; Myc, a proto-oncogene.

Magnetochromatic Spheres

Brief description not available

Carbon Nanotube Infrared Detector

Brief description not available

Chromium Complexes Of Graphene

Brief description not available

Magnetometer Based On Spin Wave Interferometer

Brief description not available

Highly Tunable Magnetic Liquid Crystals

Brief description not available

Templated Synthesis Of Metal Nanorods

Brief description not available

Magnetically Responsive Photonic Nanochains

Brief description not available

Stable Photonic Structures

Brief description not available

Synthetic Biology Methods and Systems to Synthesize Strigolactone

Prof. Yanran Li and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed a biosynthetic method for producing different strigolactones by designing different biosynthetic pathways in engineered microbial systems. The invention includes engineered E. coli - S. cerevisiae co-culture systems for the biosynthesis of both non-canonical and canonical SLs, including but not limited to carlactone (CL), carlactonic acid (CLA), 5-deoxystrigol(5DS), 4-Deoxyorobanchol (4DO) and orobanchol. This technology allows SLs to be biosynthetically produced in large scale for use in innovative  agrochemicals such as phyto-regulators,  fertilizers, biostimulants that enhance the nutrient uptake efficiency. Fig 1: Mimicking plant strigolactone pathway distribution in the engineered E. coli-S. cerevisiae coculture.

Aluminum Microchips for Biosensing and Pathogen Identification

Prof. Quan Cheng and colleagues from the University of California, Riverside have developed aluminum (Al) microchips for highly sensitive SPR detection of bioanalytical targets. This technology allows for determination of binding kinetics of drug targets and disease marker detection. In addition to applications for SPR, these Al microchips enable other surface-based techniques such as enhanced Raman spectroscopy and MALDI-MS for direct pathogen identification. Compared to traditional gold substrates, Al has a broad range of advantages. It is more plasmonically active, leading to high optical sensitivity, and it is chemically flexible for design of various analytical platforms. Al also has several manufacturing benefits that make it commercially appealing when compared to gold, such as higher abundance, lower cost, and simple integration into existing manufacturing processes such as CMOS. Fig 1: (Top) Fabrication of aluminum microchips. (Bottom) Aluminum demonstrates a high theoretical and practical plasmonic activity correlating to a higher detection sensitivity for biological targets.  

  • Go to Page: