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A Novel Method to Generate Specific and Permanent Macromolecular Covalent Inhibitors

UCSF researchers have invented a novel method to generate covalent macromolecular inhibitors. This strategy allows a peptide inhibitor to bind to its target protein specifically and irreversibly through proximity-enabled bioreactivity.

Novel Compounds Targeting LRH-1for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Type II Diabetes, Triple Negative Breast Cancer & Pancreatic Cancer

This technology contains a method for modulating the activity of the nuclear receptor LRH-1 with identified small molecule compounds that may be developed to treat inflammatory bowel disease, Type II diabetes, triple negative breast cancer and pancreatic cancer.

Novel, Immunogenic Epitopes for use in an HIV Vaccine

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has evolved a number of mechanisms of evading the human immune system.  One way is through a high level of mutation, which makes it difficult to develop a vaccine that stimulates protective immunity against all of the different HIV variants.  Therefore, scientists are searching for a general surrogate maker that could be used to target any HIV-infected cell regardless of its mutational status. In this regard, scientists have recently focused their attention on so-called cryptic peptides of HIV.  Cryptic peptides are non-functional HIV proteins that are produced due to translational errors that occur in HIV-infected cells.  Because these cryptic peptides are commonly produced and then presented on the surface of the HIV-infected cells, it is thought they may be good surrogate markers and targets for any HIV-infected cell.

Novel Peptides for Development of HIV Vaccine and Therapy

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has evolved a number of mechanisms of evading the human immune system.  One way is through a high level of mutation, which makes it difficult to develop a vaccine that stimulates protective immunity against all of the different HIV variants.  Therefore, scientists are searching for a general surrogate marker that could be used to target any HIV-infected cell regardless of its mutational status. In this regard, scientists have recently turned their attention to the APOBEC machinery in HIV cells.  APOBEC proteins are human proteins that modify genetic material of viruses so that they are unable to produce proteins essential for viral survival.  Remarkably, HIV evades the APOBEC defense by making a protein called Vif that re-routes APOBEC proteins to proteosomes for destruction thereby reducing APOBEC's protective functions.  However, this activity also increases the presentation of APOBEC antigens or peptides on the cell's surface. APOBEC peptides may be good candidates for surrogate HIV markers simply because they are present on the surface of all HIV-infected cells.  In addition, in order for HIV-infected cells to stop displaying APOBEC peptides on their surface, the virus would need to evolve mutations in the region coding for the Vif protein that re-routes the APOBEC proteins.  This would make the virus vulnerable to the defenses mediated by the functional APOBEC proteins.  This phenomenon should result in dual pressure on the virus that should slow or prevent the evolution of viral resistance to these T-cell responses.

Novel Biomarkers for Autoimmune-mediated Lung Disease

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common manifestation of systemic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), lupus and scleroderma, which can lead to inflammation and scarring of the lung and, consequently, to hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension and death.  It is estimated that ILD occurs in approximately 15 percent of patients with RA.  Very little is known about how ILD disorders arise and what role loss of immune tolerance plays in ILD development.  Presently, there are no validated lung-specific autoantigens for diagnosis of autoimmune-mediated lung disease.  Current options for ILD treatment are limited to powerful immunosuppressive medications with significant side effects.  Identification of novel pulmonary biomarkers is sorely needed to develop better diagnostic methods and therapies for ILD.

Integrin Avb8 Neutralizing Antibody

Brief description not available

Endogenous Small Molecule Immune Response Modulator

UCSF investigators have identified a novel endogenous agent that activates the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor.

A MOUSE MODEL FOR AUTOIMMUNE LUPUS GLOMERULONEPHRITIS

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is an autoimmune disease which affects many organs and has a wide range of clinical manifestations. The disease is characterized by joint pain, rashes, and fevers, as well as inflammation of organs including the heart, lungs and kidneys. The cause of lupus has been difficult to identify, as almost every pathway of the immune system is abnormal in effected individuals. The production of auto-antibodies is thought to be largely responsible for the observed pathology; however, there is recent evidence that T lymphocytes promote and mediate the progression of the disease.

NOVEL ANTIGEN TARGETS IN AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES (LUPUS AND TYPE I DIABETES) USEFUL FOR VACCINE DEVELOPMENT AND TREATMENT

UCSF investigators have identified novel antigens against which immune responses are induced in patients with SLE and type I diabetes. Using a proteomic approach, in addition to detecting autoantibodies to known SLE- or diabetes-associated antigens, the UCSF investigators also identified novel self-antigens that are also associated with the respective disease state. These results could provide novel approaches to the diagnosis and assessment of each of these autoimmune diseases

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